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By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | March 18, 2011
CORONA DEL MAR — In a sea of teenagers, veterans from the Army, Air Force, Marines and Navy stood out every few feet along long tables that filled up the Corona Del Mar High School gym. The veterans wore suits and ties or regular clothes, and a few were in full uniform. They represented World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Iraq wars. One of them said he served in a "we-weren't-there" conflict in Latin America. One man served under Gen. George Patton in the Battle of the Bulge, another was a Pearl Harbor survivor and another, Walter Ehlers, was a Medal of Honor recipient.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | March 23, 2012
Dan Huston, a Laguna Beach resident, community advocate and World War II veteran, has died. He was 90. As an active member of the Freedom Committee of Orange County, a group of veterans from World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars, Huston was a frequent and lively speaker at Laguna and Newport-Mesa Unified schools and community events. He died at Mission Hospital in Laguna Beach on March 15, eight days shy of his 91st birthday and hours before he was scheduled to share his war experiences with students at Corona del Mar high school.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | July 22, 2013
Some things are still hard for David Lester to talk about, as they would be for anyone who's seen his friends die and rivers turn red with blood. Eventually the 94-year-old Costa Mesa resident did open up, in the form of a 400-page manuscript, "A Combat Engineer," detailing his life and World War II experiences in Europe. He has since condensed it into a smaller book that has a strategically placed "Made in America" sticker on the cover. Since last month, Lester has had something new to add to his memoirs: the National Order of the Legion of Honor from the French government.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 16, 2012
George Ciampa remembers crossing the English Channel to the shores of Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944, then waiting to disembark his ship. "There was 4,000 ships out there," he said. "You could see ships getting hit, bodies and debris in the water, and you're waiting for your turn to get off. You're hearing the shells zooming overhead. " When the 18-year-old finally got onto a small landing craft to take him to the beach, the scene was frantic. He had a rifle, but his job was to pick up the dead.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | March 20, 2014
Sophomores at Corona del Mar High School tossed aside their textbooks Thursday and welcomed a new way of learning about history: through the eyes of a veteran. More than 80 military men and women, some dressed in full uniform adorned with medals and other accolades, and countless teenagers filed into the gym for the annual Living History Program luncheon. The lunch is the culmination of the program, which has sophomore world history and European history students work together in small groups to interview a veteran about his or her experiences in the military.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
More than 100 veterans and their family members ate breakfast at a Veterans Day celebration at Mariners Christian School, an official said. This year was Mariners' 10th annual celebration for those who served, and vets heard the national anthem, reciting the pledge of allegiance and saw the presentation of colors performed Friday, according to John Reger, who handles media relations for the school. Speaker "Iron Mike" Mervosh, a decorated veteran of World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars addressed those in the audience about his experiences, Reger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Foxhall and This post has been corrected, as noted below. | October 9, 2013
One Newport Beach family knows quite well the drive to strike it rich that was common during the California Gold Rush. Sarajane Bartholomae, 67, and her four daughters - Kamme Hodge, 45, Korre Hartling, 43, Krista Hartling, 42, and Tori Hartling, 37 - traded five weeks of Southern California sunshine for five weeks of harsh Alaskan cold last fall to reopen the family's gold mines. Their adventure is the focus of "Alaska Gold Diggers," a six-episode series on Animal Planet premiering at 8 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | August 6, 2013
Eighteen months ago my wife bought me a Kindle e-reader for my birthday. I recently finished my 100th book on it. To be honest, when I received the Kindle I wasn't certain I'd get through the opening passages of my first book. I'm now hooked, and reading more than ever. I like my Kindle so much that I may never read another hardbound book again. It's with utmost enthusiasm that I list — and briefly describe — my Kindle 100 Top 10: 10.) "Dream Team: Michael, Magic, Larry, Charles, and the Greatest Team of All Time," by Jack McCallum.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | December 23, 2013
I don't suppose one can expect Stars and Stripes forever. I refer not to Old Glory, America's cherished red, white and blue national symbol, but Stars and Stripes, the ubiquitous and venerated daily newspaper published for eons by the U.S. military. According to recent reports, it may be on the chopping block. If that's the case, it's a calamity of significant proportions. Once, long ago, I proudly wrote for that august newspaper. Soldiers, sailors, Marines and Air Force personnel stationed around the globe have depended on that publication for decades for their daily ration of news and opinion.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
Betty Lee Hall February 2, 1924 - April 2, 2013 Betty Lee Hall passed away peacefully in her sleep after a stroke disabled her eight years earlier. She was born in Los Angeles to Lois and Douglas Lee. Her father, a prominent architect, built several buildings on Wilshire Blvd. Betty attended Los Angeles High School and USC. She left college early to marry Capt. Robert R. Hall in the Army Air Corp during World War II. Sadly he was killed early in the war. After the death of her husband, she joined Western Air Lines as a Stewardess and flew for several years.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | March 20, 2014
Sophomores at Corona del Mar High School tossed aside their textbooks Thursday and welcomed a new way of learning about history: through the eyes of a veteran. More than 80 military men and women, some dressed in full uniform adorned with medals and other accolades, and countless teenagers filed into the gym for the annual Living History Program luncheon. The lunch is the culmination of the program, which has sophomore world history and European history students work together in small groups to interview a veteran about his or her experiences in the military.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 24, 2014
A private Super Bowl party in Newport Beach promises a rousing good time, even if those attending don't care much about football. Corona del Mar residents Gary and Julie Crisp, owners of Costa Mesa-based C2, a printing services business, are having their sixth all-day Super Bowl party Feb. 2 for 300 guests: 150 veterans and 150 active-duty Marines from Camp Pendleton. It will benefit the Dana Point 5th Marine Regiment Support Group. Organizers are calling the invitation-only party at the American Legion's Newport Harbor Post 291 "the biggest, liveliest party these military service people have ever experienced.
NEWS
By David C. Henley | January 22, 2014
The doughy LSTs, or landing ship tanks in military parlance, were the U.S. Navy's amphibious landing workhorses of World War II, the Korean conflict and the Vietnam War. Flat-bottomed and keel-less, the 328-foot LSTs, their guns blazing, crawled onto enemy-held beaches through sand, mud and coral reefs, opened their two massive "clamshell" bow doors and sent ashore deadly loads of tanks, jeeps, heavily armed troops, weapons and ammunition....
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | January 6, 2014
This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the "war to end all wars," World War I. Alas, mankind's record since 1914 hasn't been stellar. Did Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian Serb, have any idea that his assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo would be the tripwire for the Great War — a war that would kill 16 million people? Was Princip's conscience stricken as he lay dying of tuberculosis near the end of that horrific conflict? I sometimes wonder what must go through the minds of despots as they prepare to shuffle off this mortal coil.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | December 23, 2013
I don't suppose one can expect Stars and Stripes forever. I refer not to Old Glory, America's cherished red, white and blue national symbol, but Stars and Stripes, the ubiquitous and venerated daily newspaper published for eons by the U.S. military. According to recent reports, it may be on the chopping block. If that's the case, it's a calamity of significant proportions. Once, long ago, I proudly wrote for that august newspaper. Soldiers, sailors, Marines and Air Force personnel stationed around the globe have depended on that publication for decades for their daily ration of news and opinion.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | November 29, 2013
My older son and I have a Christmas tradition that I love. We give each other books. He puts a lot of thought into his choices, usually opting for nonfiction because of our shared love of history. Thanks to him, I've read biographies of presidents and other world leaders, and learned more about the American Revolution, World War II, and the Cold War. He's also occasionally indulged my weakness for classic whodunnits. My younger son, a college freshman, writes for a blog run by a campus club.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | November 12, 2013
It's been 68 years since Eddie Felix worked in the boiler room of the USS Cowpens during World War II, but he recalls events as if they happened yesterday. The keynote speaker Monday at Mariners Christian School's 11th annual Veterans Day commemoration shared his naval experiences with a gathering of more than 700 students, veterans and their families. Felix, now in his late 80s, left his family for Navy boot camp two days after he graduated from high school. To calm his parents, he devised a secret code to let them know where he was stationed.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 12, 2013
They came in droves Monday to the Orange County Fairgrounds, many proudly wearing white stickers that read, "I'm a veteran. " The free Veterans Day event, part of a union-led effort called Veterans + Labor: Partners in Service, brought together Southern California veterans young and old, active-duty service members, veterans' support groups and families to celebrate the holiday. Officials called it the largest Veterans Day event in recent memory. An estimated 3,000 people came to hear the live music, speak to veterans, visit the information booths, learn about American military history and enjoy free hot dogs.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 9, 2013
World War II veteran Thomas G. Riker has a morning routine, a short ceremony of patriotic clockwork. He walks the front yard of his Flower Street home in Eastside Costa Mesa and hoists the American flag. Then the 95-year-old salutes and quietly recites the beginning of the Boy Scout oath: "On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country. " Later in the afternoon, he takes the flag down in proper form and folding. He's been honoring Old Glory this way for about 40 years, almost every day unless there's inclement weather.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Foxhall and This post has been corrected, as noted below. | October 9, 2013
One Newport Beach family knows quite well the drive to strike it rich that was common during the California Gold Rush. Sarajane Bartholomae, 67, and her four daughters - Kamme Hodge, 45, Korre Hartling, 43, Krista Hartling, 42, and Tori Hartling, 37 - traded five weeks of Southern California sunshine for five weeks of harsh Alaskan cold last fall to reopen the family's gold mines. Their adventure is the focus of "Alaska Gold Diggers," a six-episode series on Animal Planet premiering at 8 p.m. Thursday.
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