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NEWS
By Amy Senk, Corona del Mar Today | July 20, 2012
Baby egrets and herons were spotted Friday morning in Lower Buck Gully - a sight some say hasn't occurred in years and could be attributed to a recent restoration and erosion project, Corona del Mar Today reported . “I haven't see egrets or herons before in Buck Gully, and I've been tromping around there for over five years,” said Robert Stein, an assistant Newport Beach engineer, in an email. Stein oversaw the Lower Buck Gully erosion project, which began in September 2011 and was completed early this year.
NEWS
By Brad Avery, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 23, 2011
ABOARD THE ALASKA EAGLE, anchored at South Georgia Island — We've spent the last week exploring the southern half of this extraordinary sub-Antarctic island. Our days have consisted of sailing to a new anchorage in the mornings and going ashore in the afternoons to visit the abundant wildlife and do some incredible hiking. We have found that sailing 15 or 20 miles to the next cove involves 40 to 50 knots of wind. After three weeks aboard, the Alaska Eagle's crew is now taking heavy-weather sailing in stride.
FEATURES
By RON VANDERHOFF | November 28, 2008
Try to imagine a garden where the only thing alive is plants. I can’t. I could hardly call it a garden without some birds, insects, lizards and other small creatures. Planting trees, flowers, shrubs and vines is easy. But with a little more planning and the right plants, even a suburban Orange County garden can be a magnet for vanishing wildlife. It is very satisfying watching birds in your garden snack on berries, or seeing a lizard basking on a warm stone or butterflies dancing among your plants.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | July 9, 2007
Steven Gonzales left for home Sunday afternoon with the battle scars and scrapes of a seasoned wildlife expert. For the last three hours, the La Palma resident spent time from his day off pulling weeds and planting native vegetation in the Newport Beach Upper Back Bay. He worked hard but was never alone in his endeavors as his co-workers from the Banana Republic all did their part to clear the mess and help new life grow. Once every quarter the men and women who keep the shirts folded and the shelves stocked at the store in South Coast Plaza choose a charitable event to participate in as a team.
NEWS
By Roger Mallett | November 17, 2010
Did you know that birdwatchers travel here from all over the United States to catch a glimpse of the light-footed clapper rail? This timid marsh bird is one of Newport Bay's celebrity species, but it is quite camera shy. In contrast, the bobcat is at home on the stage, and will calmly, and in the middle of the day, walk across the patio of a neighboring home with its cubs in tow. In all, nearly 200 species of bird, nearly 80 species of fish, and...
FEATURES
July 21, 2006
How can I control mosquitoes in my bird bath without harming the birds and other wildlife? Rebecca Costa Mesa You should use a product called a mosquito dunk. This is a completely biological product with a fancy name of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and is harmless to birds, fish, frogs, pets, people and other wildlife. The dunks float in the water and look like a giant Life Saver, but can be broken into smaller pieces for a fountain or birdbath. The dunks kill mosquitoes for 30 days or longer when placed in standing water outdoors.
NEWS
January 29, 2003
My relationship with the Back Bay goes back to 1962 when my family first moved here, building a house just one street away from the bay's tidelands. Since then, I have spent untold hours kayaking in her brackish waters, biking her perimeter and hiking every bluff, slope and drainage in an effort to understand this landscape and the animals and plants that depend on it. During these past 40 years of informal exploration and observation I have had many wonderful experiences on the west bay side of Upper Newport Bay, watching burrowing owls catch grasshoppers in the open fields, trapdoor spiders pulling prey into their secretive silk-lined holes, gray fox pups nervously leaving the safety of their den for the first time.
NEWS
January 6, 2004
Consider yourself a loyal reader? Think you know all the news that was fit to print? Test your knowledge with this weekly quiz -- a new feature for the Tuesday forum pages -- and impress your friends and family with your vast knowledge of local affairs. 1. Which private university, geared to working professionals, is moving its Fountain Valley location to a new, 67,000-square-foot space on Bristol Street? A. Vanguard University B. the University of Phoenix C. USC Masters Program satellite D. Pepperdine University 2. Chimayo Grill at Fashion Island will close its doors to make way for what new eatery?
NEWS
January 4, 2004
Regarding the article, "Resident wants coyotes out," on Friday: It is interesting that one fearful, selfish, self-important resident -- with a minority dissenting opinion -- should receive such disproportionate representation in the Daily Pilot. Most people -- especially those with any reasonable conception of humankind's interactions with our ecosystem -- are tolerant of, or even pleasantly excited by, the presence of wildlife in their midst. They are willing to forego some of their anthropocentric entitlements to allow the spatial co-existence of wildlife and humans.
NEWS
November 24, 2001
Jennifer K Mahal The moment I looked at the e-mailed photo of Newport Beach artist Michael Crook's work, I thought of my mother. Not that my mom looks like an elephant, mind you. But she collects them, and Crook's painted wood sculpture of two elephants tenderly entwining their trunks, foreheads pressed gently together, made me think of how my mom and I sometimes press our heads together when we hug. Wildlife is...
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 20, 2014
For Lt. Kent Smirl, keeping coyotes at bay in Costa Mesa comes down to three simple things: food, water and shelter. If a coyote sees those in your neighborhood, he'll be inclined to stick around. "You have to start thinking like a coyote," Smirl said. "You have to think why he's there. " The California Department of Fish and Wildlife officer was the guest speaker Wednesday evening at a coyote-awareness workshop at Costa Mesa City Hall hosted by the Police Department. About 40 people attended to hear how to make urban areas unappealing to the wild animals.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 31, 2014
Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger announced Friday that he plans to meet with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents and tell them what he knows about decomposed granite trails that damaged sensitive habitat when they mysteriously appeared in Fairview Park. "I have asked the city attorney's office to contact U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to arrange for me to talk to its agents about what I know about this incident," Mensinger said in a statement released Friday. This summer, two trails within the 208-acre park were topped with decomposed granite without city permission.
NEWS
By Julie Cart | January 6, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's inspector general will investigate a federal agency whose mission is to exterminate birds, coyotes, mountain lions and other animals that threaten the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers. The investigation of U.S. Wildlife Services is to determine, among other things, "whether wildlife damage management activities were justified and effective. " Biologists have questioned the agency's effectiveness, arguing that indiscriminately killing more than 3 million birds and other wild animals every year is often counterproductive.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 27, 2013
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has directed the city of Costa Mesa to remove two man-made trails threatening a tiny endangered species that breeds in the seasonal ponds at Fairview Park. Both trails, located along the 208-acre park's southeastern edge next to Parsons Field and Estancia High School, were topped in the summer with decomposed granite, which the federal agency fears will harm the San Diego fairy shrimp this winter. The work was done without the city's permission, possibly by volunteers unaware of the area's biological significance.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint and This post has been corrected, as noted below. | September 9, 2013
Costa Mesa's chief executive Friday acknowledged an inadvertent encroachment on a sensitive habitat within Fairview Park and said the city is taking steps to protect the area. Beginning Monday, temporary roping will be placed around Vernal Pool 6 and a park ambassador will redirect users and children who frequent the area en route to school or sports practice, said city CEO Tom Hatch. A portion of that small vernal pool - a kind of temporary wetland that hosts the endangered San Diego fairy shrimp, among other species - was recently damaged by a trail topped by decomposed granite, Hatch said.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | September 4, 2013
An ecologically sensitive vernal pool at Fairview Park was "modified" by some decomposed granite placed over a portion of it, according to a city-commissioned environmental study. LSA Associates' six-page report, dated Tuesday, gave recommendations for repairing the damage to Vernal Pool 6, a small portion of which was affected by the decomposed granite (DG) placed onto two paths that converge in Fairview Park's southeastern edge and go over a small segment of the pool. The pool, which is between 0.02 and 0.04 acres, is one of several temporary wetlands within Fairview Park.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | June 26, 2013
Though the signs announcing new fees for users of the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve were premature, enforcement of that fee is still coming, a California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman said Wednesday. The signs caused something of a kerfuffle as residents and city officials bristled at the notion of paying to use the Back Bay, which is bounded by city streets and accessible from several points along its length, making fee enforcement difficult. "The signs went up inadvertently," Fish and Wildlife spokesman Andrew Hughan said.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | June 25, 2013
The Newport Beach City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to send a letter to the state objecting to attempts to collect money from area residents who jog or hike along the Back Bay. The letter says the council acknowledges that it's rough going financially for state agencies right now, but collecting such a fee probably isn't the best way to start filling the holes. Mayor Keith Curry put it a little more bluntly before the vote. "Apparently if you step off our street, you owe [the state]
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | June 21, 2013
New California Department of Fish and Wildlife signs telling users of the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve that they may be subject to a fee have left Newport Beach residents and officials scratching their heads. At Tuesday night's meeting, the City Council is set to discuss the matter and authorize the city to send the department a letter asking that the reserve be free. The signs indicate that users must have a Lands Pass - which costs $4.32 for a day at the reserve or $22.68 for the year and is required for people who want to hike, bike, bird watch or do anything but hunt in any of seven Fish and Wildlife-managed areas, including the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve, the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area in Butte County and the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area in Solano County.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 20, 2013
On a windswept bluff with rippling ponds behind them, local officials Wednesday afternoon celebrated the latest phase of a multiyear revitalization effort for Fairview Park. The Wetlands & Riparian Habitat takes up 37 acres of the 208-acre Costa Mesa park. The new habitat, replete with walking trails, plants and wildlife, is highlighted by a series of ponds and streams that collectively and naturally filter million of gallons of urban runoff. Funders of the $5.2-million project include the Orange County Transportation Authority and Miocean, an Irvine-based nonprofit that attempts to curb the effects of urban runoff polluting Orange County's coastline.
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