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NEWS
October 26, 2001
Paul Clinton UPPER NEWPORT BAY -- The Irvine Ranch Water District laid the groundwork for a large-scale cleanup project earlier this week, setting aside $1.36 million to study and plan a series of natural, wetland filters. The district's board unanimously agreed at its Monday meeting to hire Bon Terra, a Costa Mesa consulting firm, as part of the planning stages before the installation of wetlands along the San Diego Creek Watershed. Bon Terra will analyze the project's potential effect on the creek's watershed.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Paul Clinton The Irvine Ranch Water District has extended a deadline for public comments about the 8-inch thick tome that analyzes environmental effects of a sweeping, wetlands filtering project. In extending the deadline to May 30, the agency is bowing to water regulators who say they need more time. The Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board requested the extension, said Norris Brandt, the project's manager. "They are short on staff time," Brandt said about the reason for the extension.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
June Casagrande Environmentalist Jan Vandersloot calls it mitigation, but Mayor Steve Bromberg calls it a quid pro quo at seniors' expense. A group of environmentalists led by Vandersloot have temporarily put the brakes on a senior affordable housing project at Lower Bayview Landing by asking the Coastal Commission to rule on whether portions of the site qualify as wetlands. In the meantime, Vandersloot and others have presented an environmental wish list for the adjacent Upper Bayview Landing park to city officials.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
June Casagrande A senior affordable housing project could cost up to $1 million more in workers' wages if last-minute environmental studies push the matter past a deadline to get on a Coastal Commission agenda in June. City staff have been scrambling to move the project forward to beat the state's impending prevailing-wage laws that will spell about $1 million in added costs if work doesn't start by December. But to get all the necessary approvals, permits and funding to start work by December, staff members say the matter must make it onto the next Coastal Commission agenda.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
Wednesday's Community Commentary by Stephanie Barger ("Wetlands not what is holding up senior housing") argues that "wetlands" on the Bayview Landing site are not the basis of the environmental attack on the city's senior housing project planned along with a park for that 11-acre site. She relates a story about the city Parks Commission, which I chair. The article suggests that we approved a plan for the park with all native plantings. We did not. We have not even held public hearings.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
Deirdre Newman Water quality in Orange County could improve substantially if President Bush signs a bill passed by the House of Representatives Monday. The bill, written by Congressman Gary Miller, who represents seven cities in the county, would provide up to $20 million to the Orange County Water District's expansion of its natural wetlands treatment of the Santa Ana River. This treatment enhances water quality by purifying the water naturally.
NEWS
June 2, 2001
Paul Clinton UPPER NEWPORT BAY -- The Irvine Ranch Water District's plan to install a filtering network of man-made wetlands in San Diego Creek has moved another step closer to reality. The district will wait to implement the program until a bill proposed by Assemblyman John Campbell (R-Irvine) becomes law. Campbell's Assembly Bill 810, which would give the district the power to acquire land along the watershed to install the wetlands, sailed through the Assembly and is waiting to be heard in a Senate committee.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | January 19, 2012
In their first critique of the Banning Ranch development plans, California Coastal Commission staff members found that the proposed project would be unlikely to meet state standards. Banning Ranch would likely destroy sensitive habitat, develop on wetlands and otherwise trip up state law governing coastal development, according to a review of the draft environmental impact report (EIR) submitted to Newport Beach city planners. One of the last large undeveloped parcels in the region, Banning Ranch has been the subject of much debate.
NEWS
January 23, 2002
Paul Clinton UPPER NEWPORT BAY -- A state agency is set to award a $330,000 grant to UC Irvine for the study of a new freshwater wetland that would add a mix of birds and other animals and act as a filter for urban runoff heading into the Back Bay. The California Coastal Conservancy on Thursday is expected to award the money to the university to assemble a report analyzing the conversion of dry land into the wetlands,...
NEWS
By Michael Miller | January 30, 2007
NEWPORT BEACH — Candace Leuthold's students aren't just learning about the environment this year. They're also doing their part to save it. Every month, the Early College High School biology teacher leads her ninth-graders to a restoration site on the Back Bay, just blocks away from the campus. The classes spent the first few months of the year listening to lectures, but last week, they broke out their gloves and shovels and set to work preserving the wetlands. Leuthold's students planted more than 200 shrubs in the soil on a tiny stretch of land near Irvine Avenue and Santiago Drive.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | January 18, 2014
Costa Mesa didn't envision a helicopter guzzling more than 8,000 gallons of water from the carefully engineered lakes it christened last year as part of 37 arces of man-made wetlands in Fairview Park, Public Services Director Ernesto Munoz said. But on Thursday, an Orange County Fire Authority helicopter did just that, swooping down to refill its tank almost two dozen times to help douse a three-acre brush fire in nearby Talbert Regional Park. "It was definitely a convenient thing to have a bunch of lakes," Munoz said.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 20, 2013
On a windswept bluff with rippling ponds behind them, local officials Wednesday afternoon celebrated the latest phase of a multiyear revitalization effort for Fairview Park. The Wetlands & Riparian Habitat takes up 37 acres of the 208-acre Costa Mesa park. The new habitat, replete with walking trails, plants and wildlife, is highlighted by a series of ponds and streams that collectively and naturally filter million of gallons of urban runoff. Funders of the $5.2-million project include the Orange County Transportation Authority and Miocean, an Irvine-based nonprofit that attempts to curb the effects of urban runoff polluting Orange County's coastline.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | July 17, 2012
While beachgoers lounging on the shore can typically see pelicans plunge into the water for fish, it was Newport Beach's Animal Control officers who did the hunting for about 40 hungry birds last weekend. Animal Control brought 200 pounds of fish to the Wetlands & Wildlife Care Center, which was close to running out of food after being inundated with young, injured and starving pelicans this season, said Wildlife Director Debbie McGuire. Storms in Mexico and warmer water can drive fish favored by the birds into deeper, cooler waters, where only more skilled hunters can scoop them up, she said.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | January 19, 2012
In their first critique of the Banning Ranch development plans, California Coastal Commission staff members found that the proposed project would be unlikely to meet state standards. Banning Ranch would likely destroy sensitive habitat, develop on wetlands and otherwise trip up state law governing coastal development, according to a review of the draft environmental impact report (EIR) submitted to Newport Beach city planners. One of the last large undeveloped parcels in the region, Banning Ranch has been the subject of much debate.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
Clarence Irwin Haydock, Ph.D., California ecologist, passed away peacefully the evening of July 30, 2011 in Fountain Valley, CA having been born April 15, 1938 in Bakersfield, CA.  As a boy, growing up in northern CA he sculled a duck boat on San Francisco Bay in the winter and was a gondolier and glass bottom boat guide in the Pacific Grove Marine Gardens for the summer.  He earned his Bachelors Degree in Biology from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Masters...
FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | May 12, 2010
Jan Vandersloot, a founding member of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, will be honored posthumously for his dedication to preserving the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. The late Newport Beach resident on Sunday will be recognized as an outstanding wetlands community leader by the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C. The award is part of the National Wetlands Awards Program that honors six individuals who have contributed to the preservation of the country’s wetlands through education, restoration or activism.
FEATURES
By Mike ReicherOCLNN.com | April 29, 2010
Conservationists, environmentalists and architects want to put surfers in line — literally. A glimpse of a perfect “A-frame” wave at Lower Trestles can send surfers power-walking to the beach, in some cases straight across sensitive wetlands. “They’re very singular-minded; they want shortest distance between two points,” said Steve Long, the former chief lifeguard at Trestles and father of famed big-wave surfer Greg Long said. A proposed path to Lower Trestles is designed to keep them off the sensitive habitat.
FEATURES
By Michael Miller | February 18, 2010
The L-shaped bundle was giving Kelly Beavers trouble as she maneuvered it carefully toward a plastic crate in the lab at the Wetlands & Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach. A pair of webbed feet began kicking under the white sheet that she cradled in her arms. A long beak, which Beavers gripped tightly with one hand, thrashed about as well. Looking around the crates, which had been manufactured for dogs but were housing pelicans Tuesday afternoon, she opted for one that was small enough to hold a single, hot-tempered bird.
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