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NEWS
May 28, 2012
Costa Mesa animal control officers pulled eight cats from the backyard of a Westside home that caught fire Saturday. The home at 1985 Arnold Avenue had extensive clutter inside, fire officials said. Firefighters quickly extinguished the blaze, which apparently started in a bathroom wall heater, officials said in a news release. Two people were inside the home and one was taken to a nearby hospital. Animal control officers brought the cats were taken to an animal shelter. - Mike Reicher Twitter: @mreicher
NEWS
June 25, 2012
A Costa Mesa man suffered serious injuries after being stabbed, police said Monday. The 25-year-old was walking with a friend near the intersection of Placentia Avenue and Wilson Street about 12:20 a.m. Sunday, when they were confronted by two other men who asked them where they were from, according to the Costa Mesa Police Department. One of the suspects allegedly threw a brick or stone, which hit the victim in the side of the head. A fistfight ensued, police said. One of the men pulled out a knife and stabbed or slashed at the victim's chest and stomach before fleeing, police said.
NEWS
October 22, 2002
Kathleen Eric Re: Geoff West's Oct. 11 commentary, "Focus on the Westside must be for all who live there." In West's commentary on the Westside he notes that all one hears these days is "Westside, Westside, Westside. Until recently that was just so much ambient noise to me." I'm pleased that West has decided to take note of the ambient noise of the Westside. Perhaps he is hearing more of a "Westside, Westside, Westside" buzz these days because the decibel level is rising.
NEWS
Jim Righeimer and Jim Righeimer | March 14, 2014
For many years, Costa Mesa's Westside hasn't fully tapped its great potential, despite being just one mile from the beach, the capital of the world's action sports industry and the subject of an innovative revitalization plan drawn up about a decade ago by residents, business owners and city staff. But now, thanks to a growing economy, quality developers and top-of-their-field city planners, the Westside has begun a renaissance marked by swapping out rundown rental and industrial properties for modern condominiums, work-live units and more detached homes.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
Looks like the pre-election positioning is in full swing. Despite Mr. James Bridges' comments ("Commentary: Westside projects cater to the Yuppie types," March 26) on the housing improvements on the Westside, the eclectic nature of the Westside has never been more apparent or more supported by our leaders. While I am not sure if Mr. Bridges considers the crime, destruction of our children's access to the parks, our inability to allow our families to walk down the streets without concern for their safety "eclectic," I do not. As a Westside resident of 20 years, I think the "Yuppie" nature of the improvements bodes well for our future.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | February 26, 2013
About 50 residents filled Harbor Christian Fellowship church Monday night to share their concerns about speeding traffic, rehabilitation homes, gang and drug activity, and other Westside issues during a town hall meeting sponsored by Councilwoman Wendy Leece. "Our City Council wants to work with the residents and the Police Department and know your concerns," said Leece, her words translated from English to Spanish by Pastor Christian Parra. Officer Julian Trevino said the area near the church — the Police Department's 10th district — saw 382 calls for service in January that ran the gamut from traffic tickets and patrol checks to fires and assaults.
NEWS
November 20, 2000
Jennifer Kho WESTSIDE -- A Latino Community Network meeting last week about family issues quickly evolved into a discussion about the city's Westside. "The city spends more money on other parts of the city because those parts are more adamant," said Phil Morello, a Westside resident. "People with a lot of money -- the Segerstrom family, Mesa Verde and the Eastside -- are influencing the Westside. They don't want things to happen here that have happened in other parts of the city.
NEWS
August 4, 2002
It is difficult to imagine how anyone could oppose a plan to get doctors, nurses and basic healthcare where they are needed. But that is just what is happening on the Westside of Costa Mesa. A plan is in the works that calls for a 4,800-square-foot health center at Rea Elementary. By its third year, the center -- a joint venture by the Newport-Mesa Unified School District and the Children's Hospital of Orange County -- is expected to handle 9,000 doctor's visits annually, and CHOC would lease the building from the district for $12 a year.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | April 5, 2006
COSTA MESA ? The City Council on Tuesday approved three plans that could transform the city's Westside from an industrial area to a metropolitan hub of shops, restaurants and homes. The plans will allow new commercial and residential zoning on 618 acres of a 1,788-acre area. The council unanimously approved the plans. "All I would ask is that people give it a chance ? keep bringing your opinions forward [about] how we can improve it," Councilman Gary Monahan said. "We asked for innovation.
NEWS
May 4, 2005
Alicia Robinson Even though the City Council has approved a conceptual plan for the future of the Westside, that plan hasn't quelled debate about how quickly the changes should be wrought. Tuesday, the council overturned a planning commission decision that would have allowed a construction-contracting business to move into a property that's been home to Faulkner's Mower Shop for 25 years. Property owner Michael Faulkner wants to sell the parcel, and the prospective buyer, Norman Dias, needed a permit to put a small, construction-contracting business on the site.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014
Looks like the pre-election positioning is in full swing. Despite Mr. James Bridges' comments ("Commentary: Westside projects cater to the Yuppie types," March 26) on the housing improvements on the Westside, the eclectic nature of the Westside has never been more apparent or more supported by our leaders. While I am not sure if Mr. Bridges considers the crime, destruction of our children's access to the parks, our inability to allow our families to walk down the streets without concern for their safety "eclectic," I do not. As a Westside resident of 20 years, I think the "Yuppie" nature of the improvements bodes well for our future.
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NEWS
By James H. Bridges | March 26, 2014
Costa Mesa decision-makers have new plans for the Westside. Until recently, City Hall has quaintly compared our city with television's fictitious small town of Mayberry and proudly described us as an eclectic community. The Westside began with some military housing, rural goat ranches, light industry and small-town infrastructure. A seemingly well-blended demographic mix of rental-owner residential with modest small businesses evolved. As with many neighborhoods, over time inadequate upkeep and modernization allowed much of the Westside to fall victim to neglect.
NEWS
Jim Righeimer and Jim Righeimer | March 14, 2014
For many years, Costa Mesa's Westside hasn't fully tapped its great potential, despite being just one mile from the beach, the capital of the world's action sports industry and the subject of an innovative revitalization plan drawn up about a decade ago by residents, business owners and city staff. But now, thanks to a growing economy, quality developers and top-of-their-field city planners, the Westside has begun a renaissance marked by swapping out rundown rental and industrial properties for modern condominiums, work-live units and more detached homes.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 18, 2014
Michelle Simpson was never one to get involved in politics. Then she learned that a bureaucratic plan could cost her the Costa Mesa home she bought in 2009. At issue was the proposed 19th Street Bridge. Had the project come to fruition and connected the city's Westside to Huntington Beach over the Santa Ana River, as the county's transportation plan suggested, she and others might have lost their houses to a widened West 19th Street and eminent domain. After decades of debate, the bridge plan died in late 2012 . For Simpson and her like-minded neighbors, it was a victorious end for their grass-roots campaign to, at least figuratively, collapse the connector.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 29, 2014
Costa Mesa's citywide effort to update its general plan continued Tuesday with a joint study session of the City Council and Planning Commission. A majority of officials agreed that efforts to revitalize the portion of Harbor Boulevard south of Wilson Street should be a priority. Parcels along the thoroughfare are vacant, or appear blighted, in comparison with the rest of the city, they contended, and incentives should be created to encourage development there. The study session also focused on examining land uses in other areas, including the business district near John Wayne Airport, the area northwest of the 405 Freeway and the Westside.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint and This post has been corrected, as noted below. | October 24, 2013
For the past few years, a nearly half-acre plot at Center Street and Placentia Avenue - surrounded by a gate that's been targeted by graffiti - has been empty. In the coming weeks, however, new life is planned for the Westside Costa Mesa parcel south of 19th Street with five single-family homes planned there by Newport Beach-based home builder RSI Development. Center Place, as the project is being called, is among the latest developments RSI has planned for the Newport-Mesa area, which, along with the rest of Orange County, is experiencing a robust and recovering housing market after the Great Recession.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | October 8, 2013
Among the amenities at Vivante on the Coast are an indoor saltwater pool, salon, various lounges and, for the four-legged furry creatures, a dog park called Central Bark. The first residents - about 75 - of the upscale senior living facility in Costa Mesa's Westside are scheduled to move in Tuesday. The 7-acre campus at 1640 Monrovia Ave. has 185 units, 40 of which are designed to be "memory care" homes for people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. The community is open to residents 62 years and older, most of whom are likely to move there from nearby communities, officials said.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | July 13, 2013
An "urban industrial" housing project in Costa Mesa's Westside is being marketed with Millennial buyers in mind. Sea House - a 33-home tract at 1036 W. 18th St. - will feature three-story homes starting in the low $600,000s. The development will feature contemporary elements, such as rooftop decks with ocean views, USB charging stations and first-floor offices that appeal to younger buyers, representatives from Irvine-based developer MBK Homes said during a press tour Friday.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | April 17, 2013
Population density, parking and the intricacies of owners versus renters were all topics raised during a City Council discussion Tuesday night regarding a proposed condominium project in Costa Mesa. The 22 live-work units along Industrial Way would be combined with a similar but larger condo complex on the site of Anchor Trailer Port, a mobile home park on Newport Boulevard slated for closure and conversion later this year. Newport Beach-based IntraCorp is the developer of both Westside projects, which would have about 60 similar units combined over about 3 total acres.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | February 28, 2013
Miguel Perez began noticing positive changes to his Shalimar Drive neighborhood about a month ago. "The houses before were dirtier," he said. A fresh coat of paint now covers many multi-family apartment complexes in the struggling neighborhood. That's in part because the city of Costa Mesa began targeting the Westside last summer with its Residential Neighborhood Enhancement Program. The collaboration between the Planning Commission and City Council was started in January 2011 to address a reduction in code enforcement employees, said Principal Planner and Zoning Administrator Willa Bouwens-Killeen.
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