Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsWatershed
IN THE NEWS

Watershed

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 1, 1999
Noaki Schwartz NEWPORT BEACH -- County representatives and members of the Army Corps of Engineers are organizing a study on the environmental health of Upper Newport Bay and the San Diego Creek. "We want a healthy watershed in Newport Bay," said county representative Kathie Matsuyama. The two-year study will address the protection of the surrounding habitats, flood protection, improvement of water quality and the reduction of erosion. Matsuyama explained that since the end of World War II, commercial residential development has replaced open space.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
Noaki Schwartz IRVINE -- The public meeting on the environmental health of Upper Newport Bay and San Diego Creek held on Tuesday was said to be interesting -- by those who were actually able to find the Irvine Ranch Water District and slip a question into the agenda. "It's a very difficult place to find. I would say my issues are that the meeting wasn't long enough to cover the issue," said Bob Caustin, president of Defend the Bay, adding that the two-hour time frame was unrealistic for the roughly 60 members of the public who wanted to speak.
NEWS
June 4, 2001
The Irvine Ranch Water District has decided to help fund a watershed study of San Diego Creek and Back Bay. The district's board unanimously approved an $80,000 payment for the study at a meeting last week. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is overseeing the $2.4-million project. The district is one of a handful of local agencies that will chip in 50% of the project's cost. Other parties include Costa Mesa, Newport Beach, Irvine, Santa Ana, Tustin, Lake Forest, the county of Orange and the Irvine Co. Each will pay $80,000, said Larry Paul, the county's manager of watershed and environmental programs.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
50, Newport Beach ... 48th District congressman since 1988 ... Has helped the city lay hands on about $4.4 million in federal funds for four local projects: Newport Bay Rehabilitation Project, the San Diego Creek Watershed Natural Treatment System, the Big Canyon Reservoir Cover and Back Bay dredging ... Advocates Orange County causes in Washington, D.C. ... A noted expert on foreign policy matters, in particular China...
FEATURES
By Josh Aden | March 7, 2008
Newport Beach’s chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is organizing RockWater, a relay-style run across Orange County to raise awareness about a local watershed March 29. Robyn Jepsen of the Newport’s Surfrider chapter said the goal is to bring attention to the Santa Ana River, which carries runoff pollution from inland sources to the ocean. While the significance of the oft-dry 28-mile Santa Ana River channel may seem small, it was once one of the largest rivers in Southern California.
NEWS
April 14, 2000
Alex Coolman On the wall of his office on Shellmaker Island, John Scholl, a wildlife interpreter for the state Department of Fish and Game, has a diagram of the watershed for Upper Newport Bay. It's a big picture: the watershed, which is the area of land whose runoff feeds water into the bay, extends not only out to the immediate area around the estuary, but far inland to communities like Lake Forest, Tustin, Santa...
NEWS
October 9, 1999
The message was loud and clear. And nobody accepted it. Pepe Serna's litany before 200 Latino youths -- that only a handful of them would go to college, most of the girls would become teen mothers and only one of them was really worth anything -- met with defiance, just as it should have. And the third Latino Youth Conference this week will help them prove Serna wrong. Between the career advice and the motivational speakers, the conference offered the students a chance to stretch their horizons and imagine what they can become.
NEWS
By Roger Mallett | September 23, 2010
Saturday is the annual Coastal Cleanup Day, a statewide event coordinated by the California Coastal Commission. Upper Newport Bay hosts one of the largest volunteer cleanup efforts in California. Typically about 1,200 or more people venture out into sensitive areas of the saltmarsh around the bay, which are normally off limits, to collect trash. Last year more than 17,000 pounds of trash and more than 2,000 pounds of recyclables were collected. Many think that the trash results from littering by visitors to the bay, which is not the case.
SPORTS
By John Burton | January 14, 2010
We’re having a great winter surfing season, yet another mega-swell hit Hawaii Monday and I’m on the road up north, hoping to see some epic surf at Rincon and other spots in the area as the waves reach us. I’ll save that report for later because on behalf of the Newport Beach Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, I want to get the word out right away about an event coming up March 20 that sounds like a blast. It’s the “RockWater Annual Relay Race,” a 28.9-mile course along the Santa Ana River watershed that starts near the Riverside-Orange County line and ends on the beach at the river mouth.
NEWS
By Jack Eidt | December 5, 2009
In South Orange County’s native coastal sage and oak woodland environment, the rivers and streams serve as the fount of life for a thriving biodiversity hot spot. These same valleys and gently rolling hills have also proven superb human habitat. After 45 years of growth and development, the streams have often been reduced to toxic drainage ditches that foul our world-class beaches and waves and have turned Aliso Beach and Doheny State Beach into notorious dangers to human and aquatic health, affecting tourism, fisheries and quality of life for our outdoor-loving sun-seekers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2011
Clarence Irwin Haydock, Ph.D., California ecologist, passed away peacefully the evening of July 30, 2011 in Fountain Valley, CA having been born April 15, 1938 in Bakersfield, CA.  As a boy, growing up in northern CA he sculled a duck boat on San Francisco Bay in the winter and was a gondolier and glass bottom boat guide in the Pacific Grove Marine Gardens for the summer.  He earned his Bachelors Degree in Biology from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Masters...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Roger Mallett | September 23, 2010
Saturday is the annual Coastal Cleanup Day, a statewide event coordinated by the California Coastal Commission. Upper Newport Bay hosts one of the largest volunteer cleanup efforts in California. Typically about 1,200 or more people venture out into sensitive areas of the saltmarsh around the bay, which are normally off limits, to collect trash. Last year more than 17,000 pounds of trash and more than 2,000 pounds of recyclables were collected. Many think that the trash results from littering by visitors to the bay, which is not the case.
FEATURES
By Barry Faulkner | March 12, 2010
Connor Gaal dives to his right, extending fully prone to block a shot aimed just inside the goal post. The goalkeeper shuffles to his left to step in front of a would-be goal directed downward off the head of an attacker perched at point-blank range. The sophomore springs from a crowd of players to either snatch or punch away a bending pass intended for an offensive player in the 18-yard box. Yet all the while, it is Gaal who is being saved. The acrobatic, aggressive iconoclast has been a big part of Corona del Mar High’s run to a CIF Southern Section Division IV boys’ soccer title, and a berth in today’s CIF Southern California Regional Division II final against Santa Barbara at Warren High in Downey at 1 p.m. But Gaal’s emergence on this team, in a new position, to what Coach George Larsen considers an elite level of play, in a return to his local public school, is as redemptive as it is remarkable.
SPORTS
By John Burton | January 14, 2010
We’re having a great winter surfing season, yet another mega-swell hit Hawaii Monday and I’m on the road up north, hoping to see some epic surf at Rincon and other spots in the area as the waves reach us. I’ll save that report for later because on behalf of the Newport Beach Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, I want to get the word out right away about an event coming up March 20 that sounds like a blast. It’s the “RockWater Annual Relay Race,” a 28.9-mile course along the Santa Ana River watershed that starts near the Riverside-Orange County line and ends on the beach at the river mouth.
NEWS
By Jack Eidt | December 5, 2009
In South Orange County’s native coastal sage and oak woodland environment, the rivers and streams serve as the fount of life for a thriving biodiversity hot spot. These same valleys and gently rolling hills have also proven superb human habitat. After 45 years of growth and development, the streams have often been reduced to toxic drainage ditches that foul our world-class beaches and waves and have turned Aliso Beach and Doheny State Beach into notorious dangers to human and aquatic health, affecting tourism, fisheries and quality of life for our outdoor-loving sun-seekers.
FEATURES
By Josh Aden | March 7, 2008
Newport Beach’s chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is organizing RockWater, a relay-style run across Orange County to raise awareness about a local watershed March 29. Robyn Jepsen of the Newport’s Surfrider chapter said the goal is to bring attention to the Santa Ana River, which carries runoff pollution from inland sources to the ocean. While the significance of the oft-dry 28-mile Santa Ana River channel may seem small, it was once one of the largest rivers in Southern California.
NEWS
February 21, 2008
The Surfrider Foundation’s Newport Beach Chapter will hold its first RockWater Run March 28 to raise awareness of pollution in the Santa Ana Watershed. The organization hopes to make it an annual event. At midnight, runners will depart from the mountains of Big Bear, descending 100 miles alongside the snowmelt as it travels through the Santa Ana River and into the ocean. The run is divided into four 25-mile legs, each run by a different team of runners who will alternate mileage to cover the distance.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
50, Newport Beach ... 48th District congressman since 1988 ... Has helped the city lay hands on about $4.4 million in federal funds for four local projects: Newport Bay Rehabilitation Project, the San Diego Creek Watershed Natural Treatment System, the Big Canyon Reservoir Cover and Back Bay dredging ... Advocates Orange County causes in Washington, D.C. ... A noted expert on foreign policy matters, in particular China...
NEWS
June 4, 2001
The Irvine Ranch Water District has decided to help fund a watershed study of San Diego Creek and Back Bay. The district's board unanimously approved an $80,000 payment for the study at a meeting last week. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is overseeing the $2.4-million project. The district is one of a handful of local agencies that will chip in 50% of the project's cost. Other parties include Costa Mesa, Newport Beach, Irvine, Santa Ana, Tustin, Lake Forest, the county of Orange and the Irvine Co. Each will pay $80,000, said Larry Paul, the county's manager of watershed and environmental programs.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
Paul Clinton CORONA DEL MAR -- Jeff Powers walked into the Orange County CoastKeeper office in Newport Beach with a check in his pocket and a cleaned-up Buck Gulley on his mind. Powers, who owns a Costa Mesa landscaping company, had been sent by an anonymous donor to hand CoastKeeper a $50,000 check to spur an effort to reduce the flow of silt, water and other runoff down the Corona del Mar watershed. Daily, nearly 200,000 gallons flow from the northern tip of Buck Gulley, near Signal Peak, down more than five miles to Little Corona Beach, Powers said.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|