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NEWS
June 1, 2000
Sue Doyle COSTA MESA -- Orange County Water District officials have closed a Costa Mesa well after detecting a potential carcinogen in local water supplies. N-nitrosodimethylamine, or NDMA, is commonly found in pesticides, rocket fuel, cosmetics and even some foods, such as milk and processed meats. The levels found in the local water system do not pose a threat to public health, said William R. Mills, Jr., general manager of the water district. "The city will continue to get their water supply from other places.
NEWS
October 31, 2007
Is the City Council correct to request a delay until MWD responds to concerns raised by citizens about fluoridating? water? ? City Council is correct to request a delay until MWD responds to concerns raised by citizens. Councilwoman Nancy Gardner and I will be meeting with MWD officials next week to discuss the city’s request. On a personal note, due to regular topical application of fluoride, as a kid I frequently proclaimed the famous Crest slogan — look ma!
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The Orange County Water District is suing industrial companies throughout the county for allegedly polluting the water supply, including one company in Costa Mesa and several in Santa Ana. By contaminating the groundwater basin with volatile organic chemicals and perchlorate, the companies are “posing a serious and substantial threat to the public health and environment,” the lawsuit reads. The district seeks to fine the companies the money it would cost to investigate claims of contamination and clean up wherever necessary.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
Noaki Schwartz COSTA MESA -- CalFed, a consortium of state and federal government agencies, unveiled Thursday a proposal to solve water-supply and other environmental problems facing the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and San Francisco Bay. "In Southern California, we take our water for granted," said Orange County Supervisor Todd Spitzer, who served on the Southern California Water Committee. "It's a precious resource." He added that 75% of north Orange County's water comes from Northern California.
NEWS
By Jose Solorio | September 7, 2011
The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta provides a third of Southern California's water supply to more than 25 million people, and it is in crisis. The largest estuary on the Pacific coast and the heart of California's water system, the delta has suffered a plummeting slide for almost a decade. Litigation over delta ecosystem conditions led to federal court decisions to reduce water exports, and a serious, three-year drought made conditions for both the ecosystem and water supply even worse.
NEWS
By Jean Raun | August 31, 2011
An essential element of a viable democracy is that its citizens be accurately informed, and that, once informed, they actively participate in the process of decision making. I fully believe that when the people of this nation have the information they need, they will make good choices. Many are concerned that the process of hydraulic fracturing to obtain natural gas from deep within the earth's surface may be a threat to the purity and availability of our water supply. The question is, should the present method to obtain natural gas be allowed to continue until good information is available to permit the public to make a good choice?
NEWS
By MIKE WHITEHEAD | May 12, 2006
Ahoy. I think June gloom is here a month early, giving us cloudy and damp mornings with the sun trying to peek through in the afternoons. This weekend will remain mostly the same ? look for overcast mornings and afternoon sunshine if the winds kick up. Boating will be good with flat seas, as swells at Point Conception are under 7 feet. Did you know that May 7 through 13 is National Drinking Water Week? Neither did I until an e-mail from a loyal reader hit my inbox. "National Drinking Water Week is a chance for water utilities and the consuming public to pause and consider the immeasurable value that a safe, reliable water supply plays in our daily lives," said Jack Hoffbuhr, executive director for the American Water Works Assn.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | September 11, 2005
As far as crises go, the Newport Beach water shortage of 1956 and 1957 won't top anyone's list. Still, for residents living in the area and for former City Manager Robert Shelton, it did take a coordinated effort to avert a major problem. Shelton -- who worked for the city from 1956 to 1961 and later served on the City Council -- said that back then Newport Beach's population was about 17,000 during the winter, and double that during summer months.
NEWS
June 11, 2008
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger recently declared a statewide drought but stopped short of calling it a water emergency. State officials, though, say it could be a first step toward large-scale rationing if the shortage does not improve. The governor suggests borrowing $11.9 billion for new projects such as reservoirs, river restoration and water-quality improvement. He wants to put a plan like it on the November ballot. Is that a good strategy to deal with the shortage? If not, what are your suggestions?
NEWS
September 28, 2001
Lolita Harper COSTA MESA -- The new general manager for the Mesa Consolidated Water District will take the reins at a time when water supply and safety are a top concern for many residents. The board of directors for the Mesa Consolidated Water District appointed Diana Leach to replace retiring general manager Karl Kemp. The change will take effect Oct. 5. With the recent terrorist attacks, many Americans -- as well as Costa Mesa residents -- are starting to reexamine many things they may have taken for granted before Sept.
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NEWS
By Paul Shoenberger and This post has been corrected, as noted below. | February 24, 2014
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NEWS
By Jill Cowan | November 9, 2013
As they await what could be a final green light for a controversial desalination plant in neighboring Huntington Beach, Newport Beach and Costa Mesa water providers have found themselves navigating something of a Catch-22. On one hand, local water purveyors said they support the development of reliable, local water sources, as competing interests statewide jockey for an ever-dwindling water supply. After all, some argue that that turning sea water into potable water could one day serve as a part of a long-range solution for a looming California water crisis.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
Construction on a water main will close a small portion of San Miguel Drive in Newport Beach for more than a week, the city announced Friday. The eastbound side of San Miguel Drive is expected to be shut down between MacArthur Boulevard and San Joaquin Hills Road from Monday to Nov. 8. The stretch of just more than a quarter mile has to be closed so a contractor can install "a critical new water main" under the road, according to the city....
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | January 27, 2012
NEWPORT BEACH - At the base of Spyglass Hill, past the mortuary, sits a 20-acre reservoir filled with enough water to supply the city of Newport Beach for seven days. Atop the basin, which was dug in 1958, rests a large, rubbery black cover. It gives the appearance of an enormous water bed that's dusty with debris left by gathering birds and carried in by sea breezes. The cover for Big Canyon Reservoir, whose capacity is nearly 200 million gallons, was meant to last 20 years when it was installed in 2004 to protect the water supply from algae, flies and other contaminants.
NEWS
By Jose Solorio | September 7, 2011
The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta provides a third of Southern California's water supply to more than 25 million people, and it is in crisis. The largest estuary on the Pacific coast and the heart of California's water system, the delta has suffered a plummeting slide for almost a decade. Litigation over delta ecosystem conditions led to federal court decisions to reduce water exports, and a serious, three-year drought made conditions for both the ecosystem and water supply even worse.
NEWS
By Jean Raun | August 31, 2011
An essential element of a viable democracy is that its citizens be accurately informed, and that, once informed, they actively participate in the process of decision making. I fully believe that when the people of this nation have the information they need, they will make good choices. Many are concerned that the process of hydraulic fracturing to obtain natural gas from deep within the earth's surface may be a threat to the purity and availability of our water supply. The question is, should the present method to obtain natural gas be allowed to continue until good information is available to permit the public to make a good choice?
NEWS
By Ron Vanderhoff | July 23, 2010
  I've probably never met a gardener who didn't also enjoy the delightful sounds and sights of warblers, wrens, bluebirds and thrushes in their garden. A healthy, diverse garden will always encourage a few feathered friends, but the abundance of birds will be far greater with just a little planning. In local gardens, it is fresh water that is the most overlooked ingredient in a bird-friendly garden. In our arid, summer-dry climate, it is fresh water that may do more to attract birds to a summer garden than anything else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph Serna | April 22, 2010
It was in his own backyard, but he knew nothing about it. When filmmaker Rich Reid spoke with his engineering buddy and Surfrider Foundation member Paul Jenkin, together they realized that the Ventura River was the lifeblood of their county and their neighbors, and few understand its importance. So the two set out make a film about the river and its watershed, and how important it is to residents. “Watershed Revolution” will appear this weekend at the Newport Beach Film Festival.
NEWS
By Tom Harman | October 6, 2009
In the classic movie “Chinatown,” Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway and a cast of other greats gave us a glimpse into the ugly California water wars of the 1930s. Water shortages and disagreements over who should control this valuable resource are as much a part of California’s history as the gold rush of 1849. Unlike other natural disasters, such as floods or earthquakes, a drought takes many years to build, and the impact worsens as the drought drags on year after year.
NEWS
January 15, 2009
Regarding a recent editorial about the Costa Mesa Senior Center (“Perhaps a new liaison is needed,” Dec. 14), the Costa Mesa Senior Center is without a doubt the most warm and welcoming of the five senior centers in Orange County I have visited. I have worked as a volunteer there for 11 years, taking lessons in cooking, computer, dancing, 55 alive, played Scrabble and bridge, all these by time donated by volunteers. I am presently enjoying a play-reading class. Our director, Aviva Goelman, came in with 44 classes offered, and has doubled that, putting an emphasis on fundraising as we are only one-third supported by the city.
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