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Water Quality

NEWS
January 15, 2008
Sign ups are now available for the inaugural RockWater run from Big Bear Lake to Newport Beach. A brainchild of the Surfrider Foundation Newport Beach Chapter, the race kicks off at midnight following the spring equinox on March 21 and follows the entire distance of the Santa Ana Watershed along its course from the mountains to the sands of Orange County. The 100-mile relay lets runners choose a distance that is comfortable for them and allows substitutions at any point along the course, organizers said.
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NEWS
August 8, 2002
June Casagrande How do you get individuals to pay attention to water-quality rules? Take a lesson from Madison Avenue. The city will soon be asking themselves just how pithy they want to get while trying to persuade people not to flick their cigarette butts in the street or to let soapy water from washing a car run down the sidewalk and into the storm drain. "It's not exactly the 'Got Milk?' approach, but that's the general idea," said Assistant City Manager Dave Kiff, who will present some rough ideas for a public information campaign at Thursday's meeting of the city's water-quality committee.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 3, 2006
Newport Beach officials are taking issue with a new report from an environmental group that criticizes beach water quality at several local spots. The Natural Resources Defense Council on Thursday announced record high levels of beach closings and warnings in 2005 because of water-quality problems nationwide. While closures and warnings in California were up 25% last year compared with 2004, Orange County test spots showed a 33% decrease in problem levels of bacteria. Because of the data, the council named three Newport spots to the list of “beach bums,” where water quality violated federal standards at least half of the times it was tested: Crystal Cove State Park, Newport Bay and Buck Gully.
NEWS
May 9, 2005
Andrew Edwards Runoff from Big Canyon Creek flowed into Newport Bay as two children tried some science firsthand Saturday by holding testing devices under the musty-smelling water. Amanda DeNichilo, 7, and Ethan Williams-Dalgart, 6, used a pair of cylindrical devices to test the water for phosphates and salinity. They protected their hands with plastic gloves in case the flow carried anything truly nasty. The children started a battery of tests to look for chemicals and bacteria in Big Canyon Creek.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | March 30, 2007
A local water-quality advocacy group, Orange County Coastkeeper, is suggesting two Newport Beach waterways be added to a list of those that are considered polluted and in need of cleanup. After a two-year study, Coastkeeper recommended in February that water officials put Morning Canyon and the Delhi Channel, as well as two channels in Huntington Beach and several others in Orange County, on a list of polluted waterways. The study looked for excessive amounts of nutrients that cause algae blooms and bacteria that could be a threat to people using the waterways.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | October 29, 2010
COSTA MESA — On Tuesday, after voters have waded through the options for state, county and city offices, low down on the ballot they'll cast their choice for two division seats on the Mesa Consolidated Water District Board of Directors. The race includes incumbents Shawn Dewane, board president and Division 5 representative, and James Fisler, board vice president and Division 2 representative. Also running are tax professional Peter Meuter, former Costa Mesa Sanitary District Director Dan Worthington, and former Estancia High School teacher Art Perry.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
Several local streams and the Upper Newport Bay didn't meet water quality standards during a recent day of testing around the county, according to data from water quality watchdog Orange County Coastkeeper. The group recently issued results from a May 5 event, when volunteers and water quality experts collected samples from 31 spots along the Orange County Coast and its feeder streams, including several in Costa Mesa, Newport Beach and Huntington Beach. The Upper Newport Bay also had problematic levels of dissolved oxygen and one kind of bacteria.
NEWS
By Nancy Gardner | February 17, 2008
Excuse me? In the Daily Pilot’s article (“Report not necessary, city says,” Jan. 24) about Defend the Bay suing to invalidate a recent Development Agreement between the City of Newport Beach and the Irvine Company, Bob Caustin lets it be known that he hopes “to achieve making water quality a priority for the City Council ” Wow. I have great respect for Caustin and Defend the Bay, but to claim water quality isn’t a...
NEWS
December 12, 2002
Ask any Newporter what the biggest threat facing the city is, and you'll probably get several answers. Many will say John Wayne Airport expansion, many others will say traffic, and many, many more will say the water quality of the local beaches and bays that are such an integral part of Newport's charm and lifeblood. To that end, we are heartened to hear of reports that show the water quality in and around the Dunes resort on the Upper Newport Bay has improved over the last few years.
NEWS
July 15, 2003
June Casagrande A reprieve from high bacteria levels in the waters around Newport Island has proved to be brief. City water quality officials think they have found the reason why bacteria levels in these West Newport channels have shot up after a year of marked decreases. The problem may lie in the sponge-like devices that are part of the storm drain filters, Asst. City Manager Dave Kiff said. Antibacterial filter devices should be in the filters, he said.
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