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LOCAL
February 27, 2008
UCI researchers have discovered new information about bird flu that could help them learn more about how the virus moves, a study shows. Despite the virus’ spread in China, it has been blocked from sneaking into Vietnam and Thailand, researchers said, which may give them clues on how the virus is spread. This is the first-ever statistical analysis of influenza A (H5N1), which may help scientists determine means to prevent its spread or even ways to attack the virus. There have been limited numbers of reported cases of the virus jumping from birds to humans, but concerns remain due to a 60% mortality rate among those who are afflicted, according to researchers.
LOCAL
By Alan Blank | June 15, 2009
FOR THE RECORD: Saturday?s article, ?Victoria student has virus,? incorrectly referred to Victoria Elementary School as Victoria High School.. . Victoria High School confirmed Friday that one of its students has the H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu. Three other students have confirmed flu cases that are being investigated, said district spokeswoman Laura Boss. The school does not plan to close or cancel any events right now on account of the cases, but the school has been sending out notifications to parents to be on the lookout for flu-like symptoms.
NEWS
August 24, 2004
SUE CLARK I heard about the West Nile virus-related bird deaths over in the Dover/Mariners area a couple of weeks ago. I added it to my seemingly inexhaustible list of things to worry about. A few days later, I went for my weekly rheumatoid arthritis shot, and I asked my doctor if I should be worried about the West Nile virus. I have a mellow but brilliant rheumatologist who generally chides me for worrying too much. "You're a worrier," she once said, adding, "but you're not a complainer."
NEWS
March 24, 2005
Even as more rain poured down this week, a subtle threat to the community's health continued to grow in the stagnant pools collecting in our back yards, our potholes and our parks -- mosquitoes infected with West Nile virus. We don't mean to sound any panic alarm. There is no need to run to the hills -- or the desert, for that matter. But in an area not used to 30 inches of rain, it's wise to be aware that our wet winter brings with it unfamiliar problems.
NEWS
January 8, 2008
UCI scientists have found a potential replacement for the nation?s stockpile of smallpox vaccine, which has been known to cause serious complications in some people, university officials said Monday. UCI researchers Philip Felgner and Huw Davies have modified a virus to produce the same vaccinating effects as the country?s current smallpox vaccination, Dryvax. The findings are part of a national effort to develop a Dryvax replacement because of its adverse effects on people with compromised immune systems.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | August 27, 2009
Local agencies are gearing up for an outbreak of H1N1 influenza that could affect as many as one in four Californians this fall, according to the California Department of Public Health. Officials at the nonprofit Share Our Selves, which runs a free community clinic in Costa Mesa, are preparing to be on the frontline of the potential flu epidemic. “As a free clinic who sees people who don’t have access to health care, we expect a lot of people with swine flu will come to clinics like ours,” said Patrick Chen, associate medical director at Share Our Selves.
NEWS
June 10, 2000
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- An unusually large number of elementary school students during the spring season have come down with fifth disease, a common childhood illness, school officials said. In some Newport-Mesa schools, two to three times the normal number of cases have been reported, said Michelle Spitaleri, the school nurse for Kaiser Primary, Victoria and Newport elementary schools. Fifth disease is a mild viral infection commonly known as "slapped cheek syndrome" due to a bright red rash that forms on the cheeks.
NEWS
February 15, 2007
A bill in the Assembly health committee, written by Assemblywomen Sally Lieber and Bonnie Garcia and carried by Assemblyman Edward Hernandez, would require girls entering seventh grade to be vaccinated against human papilloma virus, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause cervical cancer and genital warts. Is this an issue of improving public health through prevention, or is it inappropriate government meddling in parents' decisions? If this bill becomes law, my 10-year-old daughter would have to be vaccinated next year against a virus that can only be transmitted through sexual contact.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
UC Irvine chemists have found a way to detect prostate cancer that's as inexpensive and easy as a pregnancy test, the university announced this week. By identifying markers for the disease in urine, the method can detect prostate cancer's presence much earlier, more accurately and more cheaply than current tests, according to a press release from UCI. "Our goal is a device the size of a home pregnancy test priced around $10. You would buy it at the drugstore or the grocery store and test yourself," said Reginald Penner, UCI chancellor's professor of chemistry and the study's corresponding author.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susanne Perez | December 20, 2007
About 10 minutes into watching “Juno,” I fell in love with this movie for its fresh, smart-aleck humor and its characters. Newcomer Diablo Cody has written an amazing script infused with quirky charm and dialogue that is edgy yet funny and wise. Kudos to director Jason Reitman too: There is not a single wrong note in any of the performances. Ellen Page is a delight as Juno MacGuff, an unconventional high schooler who finds herself pregnant by her pal Paulie Bleeker (Michael Cera)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2013
UC Irvine chemists have found a way to detect prostate cancer that's as inexpensive and easy as a pregnancy test, the university announced this week. By identifying markers for the disease in urine, the method can detect prostate cancer's presence much earlier, more accurately and more cheaply than current tests, according to a press release from UCI. "Our goal is a device the size of a home pregnancy test priced around $10. You would buy it at the drugstore or the grocery store and test yourself," said Reginald Penner, UCI chancellor's professor of chemistry and the study's corresponding author.
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NEWS
By Jill Cowan | December 1, 2012
Three Huntington Beach residents, a Newport Beach man and an Irvine woman were among 45 people who were reported to have tested positive for West Nile Virus in Orange County this year as of Nov. 20. None of those cases were fatal. Of the 107 total avian cases countywide, four birds were found in Huntington, two in Costa Mesa, one in Newport, one in Laguna Beach and one in Irvine. No horses have tested positive this year. The tallies were released in an Orange County Health Care Agency report last week.
NEWS
By Amy Senk, Corona del Mar Today | July 4, 2012
A recent inspection showed no mosquitoes in Lower Buck Gully, a city official said this week. "Vector Control was out last week," Robert Stein, an assistant Newport Beach engineer, said in an email. "No sightings of mosquitoes. " Some residents along Lower Buck Gully expressed concern about potential mosquito problems because an erosion project that was completed earlier this year resulted in standing water that by spring had turned green with algae. At the time, inspectors said there was no sign of mosquito larvae but promised to continue to monitor the area.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | November 19, 2011
An annual AIDS conference in Irvine is aiming to create change by targeting the most vulnerable — the county's youth, an event organizer said this week. The sixth annual Youth Conference on AIDS, a free event, is hosted by the Africa Project Youth Board, the city of Irvine High School Youth Action Team and UCI AIDS Fundamentalists. "In our communities, we are not as aware of HIV as they are in Africa where it is openly talked about," said Debra Bianchi, executive director of the Africa Project.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | October 13, 2009
As the H1N1 influenza virus, or swine flu, begins to affect area schools, administrators and teachers are trying to get the word out on how to stop the flu from spreading. Twenty UC Irvine students have contracted swine flu since Sept. 1. As of Tuesday, two schools in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District — College Park Elementary in Costa Mesa and Lincoln Elementary in Corona del Mar — have seen more than 10% of their students call in absent since late last week.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | August 27, 2009
Local agencies are gearing up for an outbreak of H1N1 influenza that could affect as many as one in four Californians this fall, according to the California Department of Public Health. Officials at the nonprofit Share Our Selves, which runs a free community clinic in Costa Mesa, are preparing to be on the frontline of the potential flu epidemic. “As a free clinic who sees people who don’t have access to health care, we expect a lot of people with swine flu will come to clinics like ours,” said Patrick Chen, associate medical director at Share Our Selves.
LOCAL
By Alan Blank | June 15, 2009
FOR THE RECORD: Saturday?s article, ?Victoria student has virus,? incorrectly referred to Victoria Elementary School as Victoria High School.. . Victoria High School confirmed Friday that one of its students has the H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu. Three other students have confirmed flu cases that are being investigated, said district spokeswoman Laura Boss. The school does not plan to close or cancel any events right now on account of the cases, but the school has been sending out notifications to parents to be on the lookout for flu-like symptoms.
FEATURES
By JOSEPH N. BELL | May 6, 2009
If you were old enough — and I was, and then some — to be watching television or reading newspapers in the winter of 1976, then you probably remember the swine flu media field day that Walter Cronkhite called “sensationalizing the coincidental.” You might even have been one of every four Americans who were inoculated for that disease before the treatment was abruptly halted. Well, we’re flirting with that emotional neighborhood again, and whatever we do by way of protection should be at least evaluated in the light of what happened 29 years ago, which, in turn, was conditioned by what happened in 1918.
NEWS
November 13, 2008
Viruses cause plenty of diseases, from the common cold to Ebola, but according to a UCI chemist, they can also help fight it. Chemistry and molecular biology associate professor Gregory Weiss will give a talk Tuesday on “Putting Viruses to Work,” discussing his work with viruses to improve health. Weiss’ research has included wiring specially engineered viruses into electronic circuits as detectors for prostate and lung cancer. He also uses viruses to learn general rules of biological processes.
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