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Urban Runoff

NEWS
By Jill Cowan | December 27, 2012
Orange County environmental health officials warned local swimmers this week to avoid contact with ocean water, especially in spots close to storm drains, creeks and rivers. A rain advisory is in effect for the entire Orange County coast, including Newport Beach, Laguna Beach and Huntington Beach, after runoff from this week's storm caused elevated bacteria levels. The advisory, which is intended to reach recreational ocean, bay and harbor users, went into effect after more than two-tenths of an inch of rain fell, Orange County Health Care Agency Water Quality Supervisor Mike Fennessy said.
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NEWS
April 9, 2004
MIKE WHITEHEAD Ahoy. Now, I normally do not poke fun at the headlines in this newspaper, but I cannot help myself this week with some tempting stories involving Newport Harbor and water quality. The reporter did a good job writing these stories; I am just poking fun at the headlines. Oh, the irony. Breaking news was the closure of the beaches along Mariner's Mile from the Harbor Marina that is located by the Newport Boulevard Bridge at Coast Highway to Riverside Drive.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Paul Clinton For thousands of years, the murky Santa Ana River provided a dependable water supply for Native American civilizations. Now, with its urbanized concrete channel, the river has become a sore spot with water regulators, neighboring homeowners and city leaders. The river, long a focal point because of its polluted runoff, flood-control limitations and lack of usable open space, is back in the spotlight. As regional water quality regulators renew their efforts to clean up the river, Newport Beach and Huntington Beach leaders say they've already begun a battery of measures to combat the flow of polluted runoff into the ocean.
NEWS
April 29, 2000
Alex Coolman It's a yellow monster, a quarter-million-dollar vehicle equipped with a cylindrical waste tank that can hold 10 cubic yards of muck and debris. It carries 1,500 gallons of water in the shiny metal water reservoirs that are mounted like missiles on its sides. It's Newport Beach's newest Vactor truck, a behemoth of a machine that will be introduced to the public today during Clean Harbor Day celebrations at the Newport Harbor Nautical Museum.
NEWS
July 7, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- A seawater testing program that had been criticized for providing ambiguous data has been modified to address that problem, city officials say, and could begin in less than two weeks. The program is a state-funded, $175,000 effort designed to pinpoint the sources of pollution that flow into the ocean with urban runoff. It had initially focused on trying to match strains of E. coli bacteria collected from local waters against samples of such bacteria from humans, animals and other sources in order to figure out where the contamination came from.
NEWS
May 18, 2002
Deirdre Newman UCI CAMPUS -- Will Orange County ever embrace light rail? Can it treat urban runoff without a problem? Will there ever be friendly skies again? These are some of the tough questions a group of the university's engineering professors, along with local colleagues, are tackling as they undertake a new assessment of the county's infrastructure. A meeting Friday at UC Irvine officially kicked off the study. Over the next few months, eight committees will grade areas --including roads, airports and waste treatment systems -- before issuing a report card in October.
NEWS
April 9, 2001
Mathis Winkler NEWPORT BEACH -- Way back when, in the late 1940s and early 1950s, when Nancy Gardner went surfing at Little Corona Beach, things were different. No steps led down from Ocean Boulevard and rocks didn't secure the bluffs at the other end. City officials didn't install a concrete dam until the 1960s, and the sandy beach led deeper into the ocean. Most importantly, there wasn't a steady stream of fresh water into the waves. The beach "is a poster child of what population growth has done to the coastal area," Gardner said on a recent morning, standing on the bluffs overlooking the beach.
NEWS
April 4, 2004
ENVIRONMENT Costa Mesa studying the effect of its urban runoff A firm hired by the city of Costa Mesa began a study last week of the city's 109 storm drain outlets to see how much urban runoff is getting into storm sewers. The study also will provide information to the Regional Water Quality Control Board, which suspects a few specific Costa Mesa drains as possible sources of bacteria that has been detected in the mouth of the Santa Ana River and could have caused beach closures at Huntington Beach.
NEWS
November 27, 2001
2.5% raises on tap for key city staff The City Council will consider a 2.5% raise for key and management positions, excluding the city attorney, city manager and city clerk. Noting that, in the past, the city has had trouble recruiting for some positions, the city manager has recommended the council enact this across-the-board cost of living increase. What to expect If council approves the action, raises will take effect in July, costing the city a total of $137,173 per year.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Paul Clinton The Newport Beach chapter of Surfrider is setting aggressively optimistic goals for the new year and beyond. In recent newsletters to its members, the group has touted a goal to reduce the amount of pollution at the mouth of the Santa Ana River by 50% over the next five years. Surfrider's Newport Beach chapter, founded by Nancy Gardner, set the goal as the centerpiece in its "50 in 5" program. Group members hope to install a network of wetlands, also known as biofiltration ponds, along the bank of the river channel as a way of filtering out bacteria and other pollution found in urban runoff.
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