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Urban Runoff

NEWS
October 5, 2000
A California Water Resources Board meeting in Sacramento proved less controversial than expected Wednesday as a provision of state law regarding dumping runoff in environmentally sensitive areas -- including Crystal Cove -- went unmodified. Environmentalists had expected that the state board might alter the state's Ocean Plan to specify that 34 "areas of special biological significance" could legally receive discharges of urban runoff. "There was not a word about that, surprisingly," said Linda Sheehan, director of the San Francisco-based Center for Marine Conservation.
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NEWS
March 19, 2002
WEATHER FORECAST The sun will shine in Newport-Mesa today, though highs will stay just shy of 70. Overnight lows will be in the high 40s. Wednesday will also be sunny, though highs will near the mid-70s. Lows will be slightly warmer in the low 50s. Information:o7 www.nws.noaa.govf7 . BOATING FORECAST The northerly winds will blow 5 to 15 knots in the inner waters this afternoon, with 2-foot waves and a west swell of 5 feet. Not much will change later.
NEWS
August 5, 2001
'Nature Detectives' lessons in the Back Bay There's critters galore in the Upper Newport Bay, and Saturday's the chance for children to learn all about them. Officials at the Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center will be giving an hour lesson on the wildlife of the bay -- and why it's not very visible. Since 1975, when the Back Bay became an ecological reserve, it's been home to a fragile ecosystem that is often threatened by sewage spills and urban runoff.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
S.J. Cahn Chris Cox sees his job in two parts. As Newport Beach's Congressional representative since 1988, he takes Orange County views to Washington D.C. and reports back to Orange County what he is doing "and what the government is doing to us and for us." That constant give-and-take, he says, is what keeps him in contact with his constituents. So does having to get reelected every two years. "The job itself melds with getting around the community and doing what's necessary to let people know what I'm doing," he said.
NEWS
January 26, 2002
Paul Clinton As another way to solve the nagging problem of urban runoff, the Orange County Sanitation District is proposing to divert it for treatment just like sewage. District leaders have launched an effort to amend the agency's charter so it could accept polluted water flowing down the watershed into tributaries that lead to the ocean. Instead, it would be pumped through the district's Fountain Valley plant along with the 241 million gallons of sewage treated each day. "It is one of many things that has to happen," District spokeswoman Lisa Murphy said.
NEWS
By Amanda Pennington | March 5, 2007
CORONA DEL MAR — As part of its re-landscaping, Roger's Gardens is promoting a greener environment by eliminating some of its urban runoff and planting California-friendly foliage throughout the grounds. The garden center wants to help people understand that there are many ways to create a garden that uses significantly less water. Roger's Gardens manager Ron Vanderhoff said the problem with some of the garden plans that drastically cut the amount of water needed is their look — they're functional and people appreciate the intention, but many people don't want gravel gardens filled mostly with succulents.
NEWS
May 27, 2000
Alex Coolman COSTA MESA -- The Santa Ana River will take on a new look in June as a makeshift berm is installed in the riverbed -- part of a new county program to divert urban runoff into the sewer. At a spot on the river below Talbert Avenue, county officials plan to construct a berm of concrete barriers and sandbags. The structure could be in place as soon as June 7, said Mary Anne Skorpanich, special projects manager of the Orange County Public Facilities and Resources Department.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
June Casagrande This may be the most water-quality-conscious city around, but that's even more reason to keep working for awareness, Surfrider Foundation members say. "There are lots of things competing for our attention," said Nancy Gardner, representative of the local Surfrider Foundation chapter. "It's important to keep water quality a priority in peoples' minds." About 40 Surfrider members and volunteers lined both sides of Coast Highway near the Santa Ana River on Sunday to continue the group's push for reducing pollutants.
NEWS
October 4, 2000
Alex Coolman CRYSTAL COVE -- The battle between environmentalists and the Irvine Co. over the subject of storm water discharges shifts to Sacramento today, where the state water board will discuss its rules for determining which areas of the coast deserve special protection. The meeting has the potential to affect regulations for 34 regions of California coastline, including Crystal Cove, that are considered "areas of special biological significance" under the state's Ocean Plan.
NEWS
April 26, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- Homeowners will hear about sewage, dredging and runoff at a meeting tonight at City Hall. The meeting, held by the West Newport Beach Association, will feature a panel discussion by Deputy City Manager Dave Kiff, water quality advocate Jack Skinner and Orange County Health Care Agency program chief Larry Honeybourne. Kiff said he wants to make sure people have a clear understanding of Newport's dredging plan for the bay. "A lot of people don't know the magnitude of the proposed upper bay dredging," he said.
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