Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsUpper Newport Bay
IN THE NEWS

Upper Newport Bay

NEWS
By Carol Starcevic | January 4, 2007
Many of us have at least some impression of, or experience with, a raccoon. Perhaps it comes from some adventure (or misadventure) at a family picnic or while on a camping trip. Maybe you have caught the eyes of one with your car lights on a dark night, had one nesting in your attic or had to discourage one from raiding your garbage at some point. Despite the mischief this "masked bandit" can sometimes cause, the raccoon plays an important role in the ecosystem by helping to maintain healthy populations and distributing seeds from what is caught or foraged.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Carol Starcevic | April 19, 2007
Earth Day this year is Sunday. Come join your friends and neighbors and help us celebrate from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center, 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach. It's free, and families are welcome. There is ample free parking, and food and soft drinks will be available for purchase. This is all about enjoying the Back Bay and learning about its local environs through exhibition booths and interactive, educational displays. Many agencies and volunteer organizations from around Orange County will host booths and demonstrations to explain their respective roles in helping to protect Mother Earth.
NEWS
By Carol Starcevic | October 4, 2006
The Southern California Plein Air Painters Assn. will conduct its fourth annual "Paint the Back Bay" exhibit and sale of original art from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat. and Sun., Oct. 14 and 15, at the Muth Interpretive Center. The center is at 2301 University Drive in Newport Beach. The event is free and open to the public. Local artists will be painting the Upper Newport Bay at various locations through Oct. 13 during this competition. About 60 eligible entries will be juried for awards.
NEWS
By Carol Starcevic | August 2, 2006
Coastal Cleanup Day, which falls Sept. 16, is an international event at which thousands of volunteers pick up trash in coastal areas. This year marks 20 years that the center has been collecting debris and data in and around the Back Bay and, come the day, we'll be out removing trash just as in the years before. Our goal for Coastal Cleanup Day at Upper Newport Bay is not only to pick up every piece of trash we can reach, but also to educate the public about the bay's watershed — and we need your help.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 10, 2009
High levels of a chemical element that has been known to cause deformities in birds have been found in Upper Newport Bay. State water quality officials have ordered Newport Beach, the county, and several cities that sit upstream from the estuary to pay millions of dollars to fix the problem. Preliminary estimates put the cost of taking measures to prevent high levels of the chemical element selenium from leaching into Upper Newport Bay at $42 million to $137 million. The options for cleanup range from diverting groundwater runoff into the sewer system, instead of letting it flow into the bay. “We’re basically trying to develop some long-term cleanup plans to deal with selenium in the watershed area,” said Kurt Berchtold, assistant executive officer for the Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | December 11, 2009
High levels of a chemical element known to cause deformities in birds have been found in Upper Newport Bay. State water quality officials have ordered Newport Beach, the county, and several cities that sit upstream from the estuary to pay millions of dollars to fix the problem. Preliminary estimates put the cost of taking measures to prevent high levels of selenium from leaching into Upper Newport Bay at $42 million to $137 million. One option for cleanup involves diverting groundwater runoff into the sewer system, instead of letting it flow into the bay. “We’re basically trying to develop some long-term cleanup plans to deal with selenium in the watershed area,” said Kurt Berchtold, assistant executive officer for the Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | August 26, 2008
As discussions continue about raising funds to continue dredging of Upper Newport Bay, one resident and environmental activist has an idea he believes would help relieve some of the burden: Save Skimmer Island. Skimmer Island is a bird habitat in Upper Newport Bay near Eastbluff Drive and Jamboree Road. It was created decades ago as a bird habitat and is named for the skimmer, a small tern-like bird. But the next phase of the dredging project calls for the elimination of Skimmer Island.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 2, 2007
With the $39-million Upper Newport Bay dredging project about one-third finished, officials are realizing they may have to scramble for more funding to get the work done. Newport Beach and Orange County leaders asked the federal government for $14 million in the 2008 fiscal year, which would be enough to finish the project. But in July, the Senate only put $4 million for the Back Bay in a water appropriations bill ? four times what the House put in its bill, and when the two are reconciled, the Senate amount will be the upper limit.
BUSINESS
By Brianna Bailey | April 23, 2008
The Irvine Co. has agreed to give Newport Beach $3 million to end a local environmental group’s lawsuit over a city agreement that gives the company permission to create a new planned community in Newport Center. “It’s a very good outcome for people of Newport Beach and a great step forward,” said Bob Caustin, founder of the group Defend the Bay, which sued Newport Beach and the city council in January. Irvine Co. officials quietly agreed to the deal last month after lengthy negotiations with Defend the Bay, Caustin said.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|