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By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | November 20, 2010
IRVINE — The daily lives of some UCI students, and in many cases the lives of their working parents, have just gotten more difficult with the recent 8% hike in tuition, according to at least a dozen students who were randomly interviewed for their opinions on campus earlier in the week. Some of the students said they were angry with the 15-5 vote by the UC Regents on Thursday in San Francisco because it's the second hike in as many years — the last one a 32% increase that took effect in the fall.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | April 30, 2008
. FOR THE RECORD: In the Sunday article, “Promises not kept,” from the “Tales from the Front” series, the sub-headline and article incorrectly reported Sgt. Ben Mayer had not received tuition to go to college. The article and headline should have reported Mayer was told he would be considered an in-state student to receive a lower tuition rate wherever he attended school, but instead he was considered an out-of-state student when he first moved to California.
NEWS
February 28, 2003
Can college be affordable to students who "make the grade" and seek higher education as a career path to higher earnings? Yes and no. Fact: According to the College Board, the nation's four-year public colleges and universities increased tuition and fees by nearly 10% in 2002. There was a 6% increase in room & board charges, raising the average cost of attending a four-year public school to $9,663, up $672 from the previous year. Nationwide, private four-year colleges had tuition climb 5.8% to $18,273 with room & board costs rising 4.6% to an average of $6,779.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
Christine Carrillo Mix a little Top Ramen with student tuition hikes and you've got a cook-off likened to the Iron Chef's culinary battles on the Food Network. In the hopes of sparking student awareness and encouraging student involvement at the school on Thursday, the Associated Students carefully prepared dishes of Top Ramen to give students a taste of one of the few dishes they'll be able to afford thanks to tuition hikes. Since tuition fees will increase $135 for the spring term 2003 -- and may significantly increase again -- and students have begun to see cutbacks in of some of their services and outreach programs, students decided to take a stance.
FEATURES
August 25, 2007
A Wisconsin parish is requiring parents whose children attend its Roman Catholic school to attend Mass regularly if they want to qualify for a $1,400 annual tuition break. “Parents are the primary educators in the way of faith,” said the Rev. John Yockey of St. Jerome Parish, which operates the school. “This is a call to inactive parents to renew their religious practices.” Do you think it’s a good idea to strike bargains like these to improve church attendance?
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | January 9, 2009
Parents sitting around the kitchen table, pondering tough times, and wondering about whether they can afford to send their child to a school they have to pay tuition for. That’s an image that worries the Rev. Gerald Horan, superintendent of the Diocese of Orange’s 42 Roman Catholic schools. More people’s leaving private school is a likely effect of a harsh economy, he said. While enrollment has been declining anyway for demographic reasons, it has decreased more sharply in the last year, specifically in elementary school, Horan said.
NEWS
By By Michael Miller | November 30, 2005
Some high school seniors applying to college count on luck, scholarships to afford school.COSTA MESA -- It was another tough year for people struggling to afford college tuition, but there were no signs of discouragement in this drab Westside office -- even though most of the students present could barely afford last year's fees, let alone the latest increase. At the Save Our Youth center, which provides tutoring and financial aid for Newport-Mesa students, computers hummed and college applications lay around the tables Monday evening.
LOCAL
By Cornelia Fuertes | April 6, 2010
St. Joachim School held its 9th Annual Golf Classic last Thursday, March 25th, 2010 at the Costa Mesa Country Club. The event, which was also open to the public, proved to be an absolute success and raised more than $25,000 - an amazing $15,000 more than last year. Over one hundred people participated in this year’s event, with about 90 golfers and others joining for dinner, awards, raffle and an auction in the evening. The raffle’s grand prize awarded $800 to the lucky winner, and one of the many desirable items auctioned off was a private party for up to 30 children at the Newport Sports Museum, with food from TK Burger included.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Chriss Street | February 8, 2013
With the estimated cost of attending a four-year state college in America at $120,000, the average family of four should expect their children's college to cost more than buying a home. Even though only 24% of Americans believe college is affordable, 97% still believe getting a college degree is financially important to improve your life. This optimism regarding the value of education has provided the justification for 60% of the 20 million students in college last year to borrow $42 billion from the United States government this year to stay in school.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | July 6, 2011
COSTA MESA — With today's technology, education isn't limited to the physical classroom. One virtual school wants locals to learn more about what the school can offer them. Capistrano Connections Academy, an online K-12 school, is hosting an information session July 25 at Costa Mesa's Residence Inn for families considering educational options beyond the brick-and-mortar schools. "I think for a lot of families virtual school is something that is hard to imagine at first … but it's a lot more individualized," said teacher Leslie Dombeck, adding that "it's a very good alternative type of education.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | November 20, 2010
IRVINE — The daily lives of some UCI students, and in many cases the lives of their working parents, have just gotten more difficult with the recent 8% hike in tuition, according to at least a dozen students who were randomly interviewed for their opinions on campus earlier in the week. Some of the students said they were angry with the 15-5 vote by the UC Regents on Thursday in San Francisco because it's the second hike in as many years — the last one a 32% increase that took effect in the fall.
LOCAL
By Cornelia Fuertes | April 6, 2010
St. Joachim School held its 9th Annual Golf Classic last Thursday, March 25th, 2010 at the Costa Mesa Country Club. The event, which was also open to the public, proved to be an absolute success and raised more than $25,000 - an amazing $15,000 more than last year. Over one hundred people participated in this year’s event, with about 90 golfers and others joining for dinner, awards, raffle and an auction in the evening. The raffle’s grand prize awarded $800 to the lucky winner, and one of the many desirable items auctioned off was a private party for up to 30 children at the Newport Sports Museum, with food from TK Burger included.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | November 24, 2009
About 300 students gathered in front of the administration building at UC Irvine Tuesday to protest against fee increases that will cause tuition to exceed $10,000 next year. The new fees, part of a 32% fee increased approved last week by the UC Board of Regents, are about three times higher than those paid by UC students 10 years ago. The students wielded signs reading “Don’t Cut Our Dreams” and “Bank Bailout = $800 Million. Where’s the UC Bailout?
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | November 18, 2009
Students across the University of California system, including those at UC Irvine, will likely face a 30% increase in fees in the next year after a finance committee’s Wednesday approval of the hike. The University of California’s board of regents started three days of meetings on the UCLA campus Monday. On Tuesday, the committee on finance approved a two-part spike in undergraduate student’s educational fees – which are spread equally among all undergrads on all campuses – starting next month.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | January 9, 2009
Parents sitting around the kitchen table, pondering tough times, and wondering about whether they can afford to send their child to a school they have to pay tuition for. That’s an image that worries the Rev. Gerald Horan, superintendent of the Diocese of Orange’s 42 Roman Catholic schools. More people’s leaving private school is a likely effect of a harsh economy, he said. While enrollment has been declining anyway for demographic reasons, it has decreased more sharply in the last year, specifically in elementary school, Horan said.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | April 30, 2008
. FOR THE RECORD: In the Sunday article, “Promises not kept,” from the “Tales from the Front” series, the sub-headline and article incorrectly reported Sgt. Ben Mayer had not received tuition to go to college. The article and headline should have reported Mayer was told he would be considered an in-state student to receive a lower tuition rate wherever he attended school, but instead he was considered an out-of-state student when he first moved to California.
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