Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsTransient Occupancy Tax
IN THE NEWS

Transient Occupancy Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | July 10, 2012
Newport Beach hotels will likely no longer have to pay taxes on complimentary hotel rooms. A majority of City Council members said during a study session Tuesday they wanted to grant hoteliers an exception. Any such exception, however, still faces formal adoption by the council. City policy requires hotels to pay transient occupancy tax when people stay overnight, whether or not the businesses collect payment. After a hotel recently was found to be skipping tax payments for so-called "comped" rooms, its management challenged the policy, and hotel industry representatives appear to have successfully lobbied the council to change the rule.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
The Costa Mesa City Council on Tuesday agreed to consider increasing a tax for overnight hotel guests . The city will vote on the matter at a public hearing on Oct. 19. If approved, the Business Improvement Area tax would go up from 2% to 3%. And the additional revenue would allow the Costa Mesa Conference and Visitor Bureau's board of directors, which administers the program, to enhance tourism to the city. The tax is in addition to the transient occupancy tax, which is also charged for overnight stays.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | July 15, 2008
Costa Mesa officials say services and infrastructure will suffer if the city doesn’t get more revenue, but a majority of the City Council said increasing taxes is not the answer. The council voted not to put a measure on November’s ballot that would ask voters whether to increase the city’s transient occupancy and business license taxes. Debate centered on the transient occupancy tax, a 6% tax levied on anyone who stays at a hotel in the city. It’s also known as the “hotel tax.” Costa Mesa’s transient occupancy tax, which hasn’t changed in more than 20 years, is the lowest in the county, according to the staff report.
NEWS
February 10, 2000
SOURCE: City of Newport Beach administrative services department NEWPORT BEACH Newport Beach ranked 13th in population among 31 Orange County cities Revenues Amount Rank Per Cap Rank No 1 City Total Revenue $101,761,579 6 3 Anaheim General Revenue $51,546,084 7 2 Anaheim Functional Revenue $50,214,771 5 3 Anaheim Property Tax $18,389,466 4 4 Santa Ana Sales Tax $13,655,616 8...
FEATURES
By JIM RIGHEIMER | July 25, 2008
Why do tax rates always go up? When the economy is cruising along at 100 miles per hour and taxes are flooding the city, county and state treasury, why aren’t tax rates lowered? When homes are selling like hot cakes and the property tax revenue increases 500% on the same house, why aren’t property tax rates lowered? When revenue from taxes such as the Transient Occupancy Tax that visitors pay cities for the pleasure of renting a hotel room increases 41% in three years, why aren’t the hotel tax rates lowered?
NEWS
January 2, 2004
June Casagrande The Newport Beach Conference and Visitors Bureau is hoping that the city will agree to increase its cut of the local hotel tax. Bureau head Marta Hayden says the added cash is needed to invest in attracting future conference business to the city. But local leaders disagree about whether the city is in a position to help out. "We really see it as an investment in the future," said Hayden, who will give a presentation to the City Council next month on the bureau's request.
NEWS
By Geoff West | October 11, 2010
By the time your read this, most registered voters should have received their sample ballots in the mail and have probably given them the old once-over. In Costa Mesa this time around, in addition to a slate of state, City Council, school board and special district candidates to consider, we will have Measure L on the ballot — a proposal to increase the Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT), otherwise known as the "bed tax. " You'll find it at the very back of the sample ballot. In my opinion, it's critical that all Costa Mesa voters give serious consideration to voting in favor of Measure L. Unless you've been on another planet for the past couple of years you know that Costa Mesa, like most other cities, is in deep financial difficulty.
BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | October 3, 2007
The city of Newport Beach, which may joining a class-action lawsuit against online travel companies, may be losing millions of dollars every year in hotel room taxes, city officials said. Newport Beach is one of several cities in Orange County that has expressed interest in joining a lawsuit originally filed by Los Angeles officials. The suit names more than a dozen Internet companies suspected of charging exorbitant rates for hotel-room bookings, then failing to turn in the extra tax dollars to the cities where the bookings take place.
NEWS
August 3, 2004
Deirdre Newman After being considered for the second time, city leaders Monday approved implementing a nonexclusive sanitation franchise fee for waste haulers to use the city's roads. The added fee could be passed along to customers. After any action on the sanitation franchise fee failed July 6, when the council deadlocked, Councilman Mike Scheafer, who was absent at the prior meeting, cast the deciding vote Monday in favor of the fee. Costa Mesa is one of only three cities in the county that doesn't assess a sanitation franchise fee. Use of this revenue could be used by the city for any purpose.
NEWS
July 6, 2004
REZONE APPLICATION The council will consider rezoning a property at 2436 Newport Blvd. from business to multi-family, medium-density residential. The new zoning, if approved, would allow a maximum of 10 units on the site. WHAT TO EXPECT Planning staff members recommend approving the rezone since it would provide more homeownership opportunities in the city. They would prefer the development be attached homes, like condominiums, as opposed to single-family detached homes because the area is so commercial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | July 10, 2012
Newport Beach hotels will likely no longer have to pay taxes on complimentary hotel rooms. A majority of City Council members said during a study session Tuesday they wanted to grant hoteliers an exception. Any such exception, however, still faces formal adoption by the council. City policy requires hotels to pay transient occupancy tax when people stay overnight, whether or not the businesses collect payment. After a hotel recently was found to be skipping tax payments for so-called "comped" rooms, its management challenged the policy, and hotel industry representatives appear to have successfully lobbied the council to change the rule.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 24, 2011
Newport Beach will look to continue its partnership with Visit Newport Beach Inc., City Manager Dave Kiff said Wednesday. An agreement is circulating among city and company officials that would extend the city's agreement with the firm for another two years and is set for City Council approval at a September meeting, Kiff said. "We think they've done a good job of marketing the community's brand and booking hotels," he said. The city's partnership with Visit NB is to promote tourism and boost hotel occupancy.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | February 7, 2011
Because of unexpected jumps in revenue from two important tax sources, Newport Beach officials expect to close their $2-million budget deficit for this fiscal year. That's one of the highlights of the city's mid-year financial report, which the City Council will review during its regular meeting Tuesday night. Newport started the 2010-11 fiscal year $2 million in the hole, but it appears that no immediate cuts will be needed to fill it. The city manager's report predicts that revenue from transient occupancy tax — the amount charged visiting hotel guests — and sales tax will both exceed expectations.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | October 26, 2010
COSTA MESA — Tourists who spend a few nights in town could pay the same amount of taxes here as they would in neighboring Orange County cities if voters approve Measure L, the ballot initiative that would increase the city's hotel tax. Hotel guests could pay be charged an extra 11%, the same rate in Santa Ana, if Measure L raises the transient occupancy tax 2 percentage points to 8%. Costa Mesa officials recently raised the business improvement...
NEWS
By Geoff West | October 11, 2010
By the time your read this, most registered voters should have received their sample ballots in the mail and have probably given them the old once-over. In Costa Mesa this time around, in addition to a slate of state, City Council, school board and special district candidates to consider, we will have Measure L on the ballot — a proposal to increase the Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT), otherwise known as the "bed tax. " You'll find it at the very back of the sample ballot. In my opinion, it's critical that all Costa Mesa voters give serious consideration to voting in favor of Measure L. Unless you've been on another planet for the past couple of years you know that Costa Mesa, like most other cities, is in deep financial difficulty.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
The Costa Mesa City Council on Tuesday agreed to consider increasing a tax for overnight hotel guests . The city will vote on the matter at a public hearing on Oct. 19. If approved, the Business Improvement Area tax would go up from 2% to 3%. And the additional revenue would allow the Costa Mesa Conference and Visitor Bureau's board of directors, which administers the program, to enhance tourism to the city. The tax is in addition to the transient occupancy tax, which is also charged for overnight stays.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | September 6, 2010
COSTA MESA — The City Council on Tuesday plans to discuss increasing a city hotel tax in hopes of better promoting tourism. If approved, 1% would be added to the Business Improvement Area tax on bills for the city's overnight hotel and motel guests. The tax is in addition to the transient occupancy tax (TOT), which is also charged for overnight stays. The Costa Mesa Conference and Visitor Bureau's board of directors — made up of 10 participating hotel general managers, a representative from the City Council and a city staff member — would administer the tax. The 1% increase would make the tax 3%, according to a city staff report.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | June 13, 2010
Ready or not, the Costa Mesa City Council will approve a city budget at Tuesday night's meeting with no clear answer to how they'll save more than $8 million in spending on top of what's already been cut from city services. When the city saw it was facing a $16.4-million shortfall for the coming fiscal year beginning in July, a reduction in services and staffing across the board cut the deficit in half. In the meantime, according to the staff report for Tuesday's meeting, the city will use the General Fund to plug the hole while they negotiate with employee unions and count on additional revenues in the new fiscal year.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | February 9, 2010
Despite taking steps to balance the budget, Costa Mesa is still falling short. A midyear report of the city’s budget reveals that the city is short by $9.3 million. An earlier estimate by the city’s finance department predicted that Costa Mesa would have been short by $4.6 million, which the city could have covered by dipping into its reserve. The City Council will receive the report during a study session at 4 p.m. today at City Hall, 77 Fair Drive. Costa Mesa’s two largest sources of revenues — sales tax and transient occupancy tax — are down compared with previous years.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|