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NEWS
April 9, 2013
Beginning Wednesday, Costa Mesa's official city information station has a new home: Channel 3. The change only affects subscribers of Time Warner Cable, city officials said. CMTV was previously on Channel 24. For AT&T U-verse subscribers, CMTV will stay on Channel 99. The first live broadcast City Council meeting on Channel 3 will be the April 16 session. —Bradley Zint Twitter: @bradleyzint
NEWS
July 12, 2008
The people have spoken. And the Costa Mesa City Council has heard them. Following in the steps of the Los Angeles City Council, council members are considering suing Time Warner Cable for failing to answer calls in a timely manner and provide efficient service repairs and fair prices. Time Warner Cable became Costa Mesa’s primary joint cable, Internet and phone provider in August 2006 when the company acquired the city’s customers in a national-holding trade-off with Adelphia and Comcast.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2008
Responding to customer complaints about Time Warner’s cable service, a company executive said Tuesday that Time Warner expects to improve service this year. Patti Röckenwagner, the vice president of regional communications for Time Warner, said the company takes customer service extremely seriously. “Since the acquisition, we’ve had very local commitment — we have a cable store in Costa Mesa, we have a studio in Costa Mesa, and we do a lot of local programming — something our competitors don’t do,” she said.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | November 10, 2008
Costa Mesa is considering hiring a consultant to inspect cable television service around the city to determine whether Time Warner Cable — the city’s exclusive provider since 2006 — has any problems that need fixing to improve reception. In the past couple of years numerous residents have complained about the quality of Time Warner’s cable service, claiming that the picture is spotty and that reception is frequently interrupted. The City Council has even hosted meetings with a Time Warner representative to ask for explanations for the problems.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | August 20, 2013
Costa Mesa's official daily newscast celebrated its 500th show Monday. With a snap of his fingers, "Costa Mesa Minute" host Dane Bora transformed his usual backdrop, the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, into a multicolored assortment of balloons and confetti. "Believe it or not, today's show is our 500th episode of the 'Costa Mesa Minute,'" Bora told viewers. "That's right: 500 shows in the can. Not too shabby, if I say so myself. " The show began in September 2011 as a means of publicizing city events and other local stories.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | October 8, 2008
It was the heart of the Angel’s final playoff game Monday night. Thousands of fans were glued to their television screens, watching every pitch of an epic matchup, when the images and voices suddenly began to scramble, becoming more and more intermittent by the minute until it was impossible to see what was going on. The much maligned Time Warner Cable customer service department was flooded with angry phone calls, but a message told customers...
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | July 7, 2008
Costa Mesa City Council members will explore their options today on several issues facing residents, including whether to file a lawsuit against Time Warner for reports of poor cable service, noise pollution at John Wayne Airport and if they should levy higher taxes on the city’s hotel guests. Since the news broke early last month that the city of Los Angeles was suing Time Warner for allegedly failing to answer calls in a timely matter, provide efficient service repairs and fair prices, Costa Mesa leaders have considered following suit and taking the cable giant to court.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 11, 2008
Tucked away in a windowless storage closet behind the dais in council chambers at Newport Beach City Hall is a growing cable television station that reaches about 28,000 households in Newport Beach. Production director Dominic Dimare never quite knows when his night will end when he walks into the roughly 10-foot-wide room two Tuesdays a month to operate the city’s robotic cameras during city council meetings, which sometimes drag past midnight as residents and council members debate obscure passages of city code.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | August 20, 2013
Costa Mesa's official daily newscast celebrated its 500th show Monday. With a snap of his fingers, "Costa Mesa Minute" host Dane Bora transformed his usual backdrop, the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, into a multicolored assortment of balloons and confetti. "Believe it or not, today's show is our 500th episode of the 'Costa Mesa Minute,'" Bora told viewers. "That's right: 500 shows in the can. Not too shabby, if I say so myself. " The show began in September 2011 as a means of publicizing city events and other local stories.
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NEWS
April 9, 2013
Beginning Wednesday, Costa Mesa's official city information station has a new home: Channel 3. The change only affects subscribers of Time Warner Cable, city officials said. CMTV was previously on Channel 24. For AT&T U-verse subscribers, CMTV will stay on Channel 99. The first live broadcast City Council meeting on Channel 3 will be the April 16 session. —Bradley Zint Twitter: @bradleyzint
NEWS
By Alan Blank | November 10, 2008
Costa Mesa is considering hiring a consultant to inspect cable television service around the city to determine whether Time Warner Cable — the city’s exclusive provider since 2006 — has any problems that need fixing to improve reception. In the past couple of years numerous residents have complained about the quality of Time Warner’s cable service, claiming that the picture is spotty and that reception is frequently interrupted. The City Council has even hosted meetings with a Time Warner representative to ask for explanations for the problems.
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Fess up, Time Warner. Or pony up the refunds. A bit of background: Costa Mesa residents are experiencing more than a little difficulty with their television screens, and at some inopportune times, such as during sporting events. Consider: It was the heart of the Angel’s final playoff game. Thousands of fans were glued to their television screens, watching every pitch of an epic matchup, when the images and voices suddenly began to scramble, becoming more and more intermittent by the minute until it was impossible to see what was going on. The much maligned Time Warner Cable customer service department was flooded with angry phone calls, but a message told customers that their calls were futile because the company has no control over the problem.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | October 8, 2008
It was the heart of the Angel’s final playoff game Monday night. Thousands of fans were glued to their television screens, watching every pitch of an epic matchup, when the images and voices suddenly began to scramble, becoming more and more intermittent by the minute until it was impossible to see what was going on. The much maligned Time Warner Cable customer service department was flooded with angry phone calls, but a message told customers...
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | July 7, 2008
Costa Mesa City Council members will explore their options today on several issues facing residents, including whether to file a lawsuit against Time Warner for reports of poor cable service, noise pollution at John Wayne Airport and if they should levy higher taxes on the city’s hotel guests. Since the news broke early last month that the city of Los Angeles was suing Time Warner for allegedly failing to answer calls in a timely matter, provide efficient service repairs and fair prices, Costa Mesa leaders have considered following suit and taking the cable giant to court.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 11, 2008
Tucked away in a windowless storage closet behind the dais in council chambers at Newport Beach City Hall is a growing cable television station that reaches about 28,000 households in Newport Beach. Production director Dominic Dimare never quite knows when his night will end when he walks into the roughly 10-foot-wide room two Tuesdays a month to operate the city’s robotic cameras during city council meetings, which sometimes drag past midnight as residents and council members debate obscure passages of city code.
NEWS
By Chris Caesar | February 20, 2008
A representative of Time Warner addressed the Costa Mesa City Council hoping to dispel concerns about the quality of service in the city Tuesday, though many in attendance remained unimpressed by the cable giant’s presentation. The council requested the hearing following the airing of several grievances by residents, including spotty service, allegedly incompetent repair staff, and long waits on hold. Time Warner Cable became Costa Mesa’s primary joint cable, Internet and telephone provider in August 2006, when the company switched holdings with Adelphia and Comcast in a national trade-off.
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