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Tide Pools

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NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | March 22, 2008
On a typical weekday at low tide, Marine Life Refuge Supervisor Amy Stine is busy conducting noisy groups of school children through the fragile ecosystem that is the tide pools at Little Corona Beach “We’ve had problems with school groups just randomly showing up,” Stine said. “We could have 500 kids showing up at once. We get a lot of kids tripping over themselves and falling in the water.” Stine oversees a staff of 12 part-time city tide pool rangers who try to educate beachcombers and school kids about the tide pools and protect the organisms in there.
NEWS
May 25, 2005
Lauren Vane On nearly every flight arriving at John Wayne Airport there is always a certain passenger onboard. He or she is the squirrelly 9-year-old who has been running around the cabin for the duration of the flight babbling nonstop about Mickey Mouse and Splash Mountain. Many sleepless nights and one long flight have amounted to this moment in every child's life: It's time to go to Disneyland. While amusement parks like Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm bring herds of tourists to the area each year, Orange County is also home to hundreds of natural attractions that scatter the coastline from Newport Beach to Dana Point: the tide pools.
NEWS
October 26, 1999
Susan McCormack CORONA DEL MAR -- Miss Manners meets Mother Nature in a brochure on tide pool etiquette the city co-sponsored to prevent the destruction of the delicate habitats. The Orange County Coast Commission debuted the brochure, entitled "Between a rock and a hard place," at a recent Coastal Commission meeting. The brochure is meant primarily for teachers and students and will be sent to every school in the county. "People are walking on tide pools and turning over rocks."
NEWS
February 8, 2003
June Casagrande On a busy day, 400 school children might tour the tide pools at Little Corona. If each of them took home a shell, a star fish or some other souvenir, the tide pools could be decimated in one day. A team of about 20 rangers are the front-line defense for these delicate habitats. They may be the only reason these tide pools survive. City Council members on Tuesday will get a briefing on the 3-year-old ranger program that Assistant City Manager Dave Kiff calls a huge success.
NEWS
June 22, 2001
Paul Clinton CRYSTAL COVE -- To help protect the delicate marine ecosystem at Little Corona tide pools, Newport Beach has placed an order for explanatory brochures. The laminated, folding pamphlets include colorful pictures of sea life -- including gooseneck barnacle, rock weed and a black turban snail. They also include five tips to protect the tide pools from excited children. The brochures advise children not to remove shells or rocks, pick up the animals or overturn rocks.
NEWS
July 26, 2001
-- Paul Clinton The Orange County Board of Supervisors has implemented a program to help protect the county's delicate tide pools using state grant money. The board on Tuesday approved the use of $265,000 for seven marine-life refuges. The county will spend $185,000 this year to hire a coordinator, put up signs at the tide pools and implement a public-education program. The county will spend $55,000 each of the next two years to keep the program going.
NEWS
March 13, 2000
Jasmine Lee Melody Alley smoothly scrambled across the slippery rocks at Little Corona State Beach, stopping occasionally to bend closer to the tide pools. Softly and slowly, but surely, she lifted a brownish, slug-like creature. The California sea hare -- a fragile animal with its glass-like shell underneath its skin -- lie upon her still hand, perhaps a bit confused and a little uncomfortable. Alley splashed some water on the sea hare, which is named for its tentacles that resemble rabbit ears.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
June Casagrande Somewhere in the sparkling depths of Corona del Mar's tide pools is a hermit crab that won't have to go homeless thanks to one little girl. City officials were surprised and touched recently when they received an envelope from a Riverside County schoolgirl identified only as Katherine. The envelope contained some plastic bubble wrap carefully protecting its contents: two small seashells. There was also a note. "Dear friends. I am sorry I took these shells from the Corona del Mar tide pool on April 12, 2004.
NEWS
October 14, 2002
June Casagrande People love tide pools so much, they're loving them to death. That's the message of a new joint effort to get the word out to beach visitors on how to avoid damaging these delicate natural wonders. "People need to know that these are very fragile resources," said Harbor Resources Director Tony Melum, whose department has created a link on the city's Web site to educate people about tide pools. "People need to know that they should look and not touch.
NEWS
August 21, 1999
An artificial tide pool at Big Corona -- it's an idea that hasn't won a whole lot of support, but it's one we think is worth consideration. Careful consideration. The reason: The natural tide pools at Little Corona are suffering. Too many children visit the site every year and stomp through the sensitive habitat. Some of the marine life has died, the rest are small and sickly. One way to protect the precious ecosystem is simply to limit the number of visitors to the Little Corona tide pools.
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NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | March 22, 2008
On a typical weekday at low tide, Marine Life Refuge Supervisor Amy Stine is busy conducting noisy groups of school children through the fragile ecosystem that is the tide pools at Little Corona Beach “We’ve had problems with school groups just randomly showing up,” Stine said. “We could have 500 kids showing up at once. We get a lot of kids tripping over themselves and falling in the water.” Stine oversees a staff of 12 part-time city tide pool rangers who try to educate beachcombers and school kids about the tide pools and protect the organisms in there.
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NEWS
August 4, 2006
Newport Beach tide pool rangers suspect recent high water temperatures are the reason hundreds of dead sea urchins have been found littering the beach at Little Corona since Sunday. The rangers picked up some of the knobby green-and-purple shells but they were still easy to find among the rocks and patches of seaweed on Thursday. Water temperatures have been high for about three weeks, with a recent peak at 80 degrees. When the water gets hotter than 73 degrees, pathogens dangerous to sea urchins thrive, said Amy Stine, a marine life refuge supervisor for the city of Newport Beach.
FEATURES
By Lauren Vane | June 23, 2006
If you head down to the tide pools at Corona del Mar's Little Corona, don't worry if you're confused about what marine creatures you're looking at. On most days, high or low tide, the tide pools are staffed with friendly and helpful tide pool rangers who work to educate visitors and protect the marine environment. "The tide pools are a very delicate environment and delicate ecosystem," said Marine Life Refuge Supervisor Amy Stine. Newport's tide pool ranger program is unusual.
NEWS
By By Lindsay Sandham | October 23, 2005
Longtime Balboa Island resident was an assemblyman, 1963-77, and then congressman, 1977-89.Former Congressman and state Assemblyman Robert E. Badham died Friday at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian after suffering a heart attack. He was 76. The longtime Balboa Island resident served as a California assemblyman from 1963 to 1977 and then as congressman from 1977 to 1989. Badham was also a member of the civil service board -- his term was set to expire in 2006. Although he was seen by the public as a fiscal conservative, he was also well-known for being environmentally conscious and wrote many bills to defend and protecting natural resources and marine life.
NEWS
March 13, 2005
If all goes well and according to plan, by this fall we all may know the source of pollutants that continue to plague Corona del Mar's Buck Gully and nearby creeks and beaches. Last week, the Newport Beach City Council approved a $90,000 contract for a groundwater study to determine where the runoff in the gully, as well as Morning Canyon and Pelican Point, is coming from. That relatively minor expense could prove to be of major import if it enables to city to halt or treat a flow of as much as 350 gallons of polluted water a minute.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
Andrew Edwards Just where does Buck Gully's runoff come from? The Newport Beach City Council is scheduled to consider a contract tonight, which would put the city in business with an environmental company, to investigate the source of runoff that has plagued Little Corona Beach. If the deal is approved, the city would pay slightly less than $90,000 to Todd Engineers, an Emeryville company that specializes in groundwater analysis. The study would focus on water that ends up in Buck Gully as well as nearby Morning Canyon and in three creeks near Pelican Point.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
June Casagrande Somewhere in the sparkling depths of Corona del Mar's tide pools is a hermit crab that won't have to go homeless thanks to one little girl. City officials were surprised and touched recently when they received an envelope from a Riverside County schoolgirl identified only as Katherine. The envelope contained some plastic bubble wrap carefully protecting its contents: two small seashells. There was also a note. "Dear friends. I am sorry I took these shells from the Corona del Mar tide pool on April 12, 2004.
NEWS
February 8, 2003
June Casagrande On a busy day, 400 school children might tour the tide pools at Little Corona. If each of them took home a shell, a star fish or some other souvenir, the tide pools could be decimated in one day. A team of about 20 rangers are the front-line defense for these delicate habitats. They may be the only reason these tide pools survive. City Council members on Tuesday will get a briefing on the 3-year-old ranger program that Assistant City Manager Dave Kiff calls a huge success.
NEWS
October 14, 2002
June Casagrande People love tide pools so much, they're loving them to death. That's the message of a new joint effort to get the word out to beach visitors on how to avoid damaging these delicate natural wonders. "People need to know that these are very fragile resources," said Harbor Resources Director Tony Melum, whose department has created a link on the city's Web site to educate people about tide pools. "People need to know that they should look and not touch.
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