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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
COSTA MESA — The Newport-Mesa Unified School District has made six prospective high school textbooks available for public review through April 25. Afterward, the school board will consider approving the books for use in grades 10-12, but such action would be separate from any board approval of district money to fund book purchases, said Thomas Antal, the district's director of secondary curriculum and instruction. The textbooks up for review are "AP Psychology," "International Business," "Comparative Politics," "Introduction to the Human Body," "Environmental Science for AP" and "Everything's an Argument.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | September 22, 2007
College textbook prices have been growing at four times the rate of inflation since 1994, according to a nonpartisan public interest group; but there are ways to save money. While there is one Assembly bill pending that publishers advocate and another bill on the governor’s desk that would address the rising cost of textbooks, students are turning to computers and libraries to lower their book budgets. “In some years I spend $900 on textbooks. That’s 20% of my course fees,” said Ching-Yun, a UC Irvine student.
NEWS
By Jack Salisbury | August 27, 2008
Krystal Acosta comes off as a jovial person, laughing between sentences and wearing an almost permanent smile on her face. But if you ask her about the textbooks she has to pay for, the smile quickly dissipates. “Textbook prices suck,” the 23-year-old OCC student said. “Some books are unnecessarily overpriced. It’s pretty ridiculous. It’d be nice if book companies could cut us some slack.” Acosta, who pays for her own education, is not unlike many local students who are burdened by the significant price of textbooks.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustees approved textbooks in foreign language, math, social science and science at its meeting Tuesday night. The board unanimously approved the textbooks, but Trustee Wendy Leece took exception to a science book called "Life: The Science of Biology." The board also unanimously approved instructional videos for students in fourth, fifth and sixth grades. The videos are used by school nurses in a one-hour growth and development class.
NEWS
January 31, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Students faced with repeated tuition hikes have to dig even deeper in their pockets as newer and more costly textbooks hit the shelves each semester. In a report released Thursday, a student group found that students are paying up to 20% of their fees for their textbooks -- about $1,000 a year at UC Irvine, according to one official. Publishers are partially responsible for the costs by frequently releasing new editions and bundling books with other materials, the report said.
NEWS
August 30, 2008
Sen. Tom Harman is on the right track. Young adults — and non-traditional college students — are paying too much for textbooks. A recent state report, requested by Harman, showed that textbooks make up 59% of community college students’ expenses. Publishers of such textbooks often increase the frequency of new editions, preventing students from buying used (and cheaper) books. They also bundle items such as CDs and DVDs in with the textbooks, features that jack up the prices of the textbooks.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | October 11, 2012
The school board this week certified that it meets state standards in providing students with textbooks and instructional materials, despite concerns from the teachers' union and Trustee Katrina Foley. The Newport-Mesa Unified School District's Board of Education voted 5 to 1 Tuesday to adopt a resolution certifying that the district is providing each student with "sufficient" materials, including laboratory science equipment, for the 2012-13 school year. Foley dissented. Board member Karen Yelsey was absent.
NEWS
August 18, 2008
College students bemoaning expensive textbooks have reason to complain. Sen. Tom Harman (R-Huntington Beach) announced Aug. 12 that the California State Auditor completed his request for a report on the rising prices of textbooks. The report concluded textbooks account for 59% of a community college student?s costs, and 22% of the costs for those attending a California state university. Textbook retailers charge significantly more than other book publishers and campus bookstores often raise the price of textbooks by as much as 43% from the publisher?
NEWS
December 7, 2004
Shopping 'Island' for the right film Shoppers who visit Bloomingdale's at Fashion Island today can help the Newport Beach Film Festival and receive a discount and gift cards for themselves. The "Shopping Works Wonders" promotion, a partnership between Bloomingdale's and the film festival, allows shoppers to get a 10% discount on their purchases and a $15 gift card for every $150 they spend. After they're done shopping, people can show their receipts from today's purchases at the store's welcome desk, and the store will donate 10% of the total to the Newport Beach Film Festival.
NEWS
By: | October 7, 2005
Hearing Tuesday on textbooks Laguna Beach Unified School District Instructional Services will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11, to ensure the availability of textbooks and instructional materials for 2005-06. The meeting will take place in the district board room, 550 Blumont St. Information: (949) 497-7700. High school names assistant principal Robert Billinger has been hired as assistant principal at Laguna Beach High School. His responsibilities include discipline and attendance, and he is also a participant on the Q4E Seed Committee, Substance Abuse Task Force and the county-sponsored Child Welfare and Attendance group.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | October 11, 2012
The school board this week certified that it meets state standards in providing students with textbooks and instructional materials, despite concerns from the teachers' union and Trustee Katrina Foley. The Newport-Mesa Unified School District's Board of Education voted 5 to 1 Tuesday to adopt a resolution certifying that the district is providing each student with "sufficient" materials, including laboratory science equipment, for the 2012-13 school year. Foley dissented. Board member Karen Yelsey was absent.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | October 10, 2011
Elementary school backpacks are about to get a little lighter. Although the Newport-Mesa Unified School District has posted some of its textbooks on the Internet since 2007, all K-6 social science, math, English, language arts and science textbooks are now available to students online. "I think the biggest impact is they won't have to lug those textbooks home," said Jenith Mishne, the district's director of educational technology. Depending on the publisher, the online textbooks range from PDFs of books to interactive experiences with features like practice books, word definitions, videos and audio, Mishne said.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
COSTA MESA — The Newport-Mesa Unified School District has made six prospective high school textbooks available for public review through April 25. Afterward, the school board will consider approving the books for use in grades 10-12, but such action would be separate from any board approval of district money to fund book purchases, said Thomas Antal, the district's director of secondary curriculum and instruction. The textbooks up for review are "AP Psychology," "International Business," "Comparative Politics," "Introduction to the Human Body," "Environmental Science for AP" and "Everything's an Argument.
NEWS
By Joanna Clay, joanna.clay@latimes.com | August 7, 2010
IRVINE — On Friday, UC Irvine's School of Medicine ushered in the class of 2014. This year, instead of finding a shiny new stethoscope in their pockets, they got something a little sweeter: an Apple iPad. So far, the program is the first in the nation to equip their medical students with the digital device. Part of the iMed initiative, UC Irvine believes modern medicine involves a growing commitment to cutting-edge technology. "The physician's 'black bag' of the 21st century eventually won't contain the standard stethoscope, tuning fork and reflex hammer, but rather new generations of digital tools that allow students to enter a realm of routine examinations heretofore unimaginable," UCI Dean Ralph V. Clayman said in a statement.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | May 20, 2010
A new bookstore contract leaves the future of Orange Coast College athletic, performing arts and academic program funding uncertain. The Coast Community College District, which also oversees Golden West College in Huntington Beach and Coastline Community College in Fountain Valley, consolidated its three campus bookstores in April, sending bookstore revenues to the district instead of directly to the college with no indication whether the money...
NEWS
By Alan Blank | March 20, 2009
One of the world’s premier orchestras, the London Symphony Orchestra, led by one of the world’s most in-demand conductors, Valery Gergiev, came to Orange County for the first time in 20 years, giving Costa Mesa audiences a technically brilliant and unsentimental performance of Beethoven’s piano concertos and Prokofiev’s symphonies. Touring with Russian pianist Alexei Volodin, whose agility and seemingly effortlessly flawless playing matches the orchestra to a “T,” the LSO came to Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall on Wednesday and Thursday nights for back-to-back programs.
NEWS
August 30, 2008
Sen. Tom Harman is on the right track. Young adults — and non-traditional college students — are paying too much for textbooks. A recent state report, requested by Harman, showed that textbooks make up 59% of community college students’ expenses. Publishers of such textbooks often increase the frequency of new editions, preventing students from buying used (and cheaper) books. They also bundle items such as CDs and DVDs in with the textbooks, features that jack up the prices of the textbooks.
NEWS
By Jack Salisbury | August 27, 2008
Krystal Acosta comes off as a jovial person, laughing between sentences and wearing an almost permanent smile on her face. But if you ask her about the textbooks she has to pay for, the smile quickly dissipates. “Textbook prices suck,” the 23-year-old OCC student said. “Some books are unnecessarily overpriced. It’s pretty ridiculous. It’d be nice if book companies could cut us some slack.” Acosta, who pays for her own education, is not unlike many local students who are burdened by the significant price of textbooks.
NEWS
August 18, 2008
College students bemoaning expensive textbooks have reason to complain. Sen. Tom Harman (R-Huntington Beach) announced Aug. 12 that the California State Auditor completed his request for a report on the rising prices of textbooks. The report concluded textbooks account for 59% of a community college student?s costs, and 22% of the costs for those attending a California state university. Textbook retailers charge significantly more than other book publishers and campus bookstores often raise the price of textbooks by as much as 43% from the publisher?
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