Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsTest Scores
IN THE NEWS

Test Scores

NEWS
By By Michael Miller | October 28, 2005
Newport-Mesa, a diverse district, saw each of its major subgroups advance at about same rate. Each ethnic group in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District achieved higher test scores in 2005 than it did the year before, according to data released Thursday by the state Department of Education. Partly as a result, 93% of Newport-Mesa's schools met all of their state growth targets in 2004-05, an all-time record for the district. Only 68% of public schools in California achieved the same feat.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 6, 2002
At the risk of sounding both flippant and simplistic, I say, "It's the size, stupid." Lower the class size of all English and math classes throughout the district to no more than 25 students to one teacher ("Testing divide remains at district schools," Aug. 30). Last year, I taught a class of 41 teenagers. Some of my colleagues teach up to 45. That's criminal. Also, school board member Wendy Leece needs a bit of an English grammar review. It's not "less [students]
NEWS
August 9, 2001
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- Student test scores continue to creep upward at a slow but steady pace in Newport-Mesa. The highlight of the results of the fourth year of Stanford 9 achievement tests released this week show that elementary school students in second through fifth grades showed improvement in all four areas tested -- reading, math, language and spelling. Students in sixth through 11th grades improved in most areas, with a few scores unchanging and a couple of slight dips.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | January 20, 2009
Schools on Costa Mesa’s Westside are working aggressively to boost their scores — and their profile — and are seeing results, officials said at a Newport-Mesa School Board study session Tuesday. Principals from the district’s high schools, middle schools and elementary schools are meeting this week with the school board to report their progress, explain their goals for the year to come and talk about how they plan to improve test scores. Schools from the areas around Estancia High School and Newport Harbor High School gave reports Tuesday, while Costa Mesa High School and Corona Del Mar High School are scheduled for today.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | April 19, 2012
In an effort to pull up Paularino Elementary School's test scores, campus officials want to look at becoming the district's second magnet school. In her proposal to bring the K-6 Costa Mesa campus out of Program Improvement, Interim Principal Bonnie Swann said Paularino wants to become an arts magnet and already has several teachers who are strongly dedicated to the arts. "I think it's wonderful that they're the first school that got out of the box and came in with something different than [Response to Intervention]
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Gov. Gray Davis has proposed increased funding for a statewide after-school program based on a favorable report from UC Irvine. Researchers in the school's Department of Education studied the After School Learning and Safe Neighborhoods Partnerships Program and found it had a positive influence on students. The report, released Friday, prompted Davis to recommend expanding the program to serve an additional 79,000 children. "The study shows improved test scores in reading and math, better school attendance and better behavior among participating students," Davis said Friday.
NEWS
December 22, 2002
Martha Fluor is a bit different than the typical school board trustee in that, for the most part, she didn't attend American schools growing up. She speaks fluent Spanish because she lived in South America for a while. And in addition to Chile and Venezuela, she also lived in Northern Africa -- in Liberia. But Fluor, now a nearly 20-year area resident, certainly has Newport-Mesa children, including her granddaughter, at heart. That's why Fluor, an 11-year school board trustee, serves the Newport-Mesa Unified School District.
NEWS
By Julie Hagy | June 14, 2010
  Paying attention in Marcus Franco's class pays off. Students in his Algebra I classes at Costa Mesa High School culminated a year-long accountability project last week by collectively pulling $4,200 out of a "money grab box." The box contained currency amounts ranging from 25 cents to $100, and students earned draws from it for their test scores, attendance records and paying attention in class. Each paper dollar was inscribed with a dollar amount that could be redeemed for real cash later that afternoon.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
GAY GEISER-SANDOVAL Well, the Stanford 9 test results are out, and it's time to place the blame on somebody. Some say we should blame the teachers. That's the easiest way to explain why some schools, with yearly predictability, fall below the 50% level. In fact, what we need to do is punish those teachers who can't get their pupils to at least an 85% testing level. Surely grave socioeconomic or language problems can't cause low test scores. While I'm the first to agree that some teachers could do a better job, I don't believe their worth should be determined by test results.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
With Newport-Mesa students about to return to class this week, we asked Supt. Jeffrey Hubbard to reflect on his summer vacation and the coming school year. Question: What did you think of the “Newport Harbor: The Real Orange County” show and was it an accurate portrayal of the student body? Answer: I have not seen “Newport Harbor: The Real Orange County.” I am told it was not an accurate representation, at all. We have not and will not endorse this show nor participate with MTV in its production.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|