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NEWS
April 29, 2003
BRIEFLY IN THE NEWS Newport not at fault in jail cell beating The state Supreme Court on Monday reversed a previous court's ruling and decided that the city of Newport Beach was not responsible for injuries a man suffered while in police custody. Craig Teter was arrested on suspicion of public intoxication and then jailed to sober up on June 8, 1997. The next morning, another prisoner, arrested for sleeping on the beach, joined the same cell and severely beat Teter, leaving him with a broken eye socket and concussion.
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NEWS
January 16, 2008
A bill that State Sen. Tom Harman hoped would expedite the state’s death row appeals process was nixed in committee Tuesday, when a 2-2 committee vote along party lines rejected the bill. Harman, who called the state’s system a “de facto moratorium” on the death penalty, said he felt the Democrats who voted against the bill did so to maintain the system’s often decades-long appeals process. Harman cited a shortage of qualified attorneys and other problems he said contributed to the long wait.
NEWS
April 2, 2005
Andrew Edwards The attorney representing the Newport Beach nonprofit in its battle against the California Coastal Commission said the legal remedy sought by his client would strip away the commission's powers to issue or deny coastal development permits. "The Coastal Commission cannot be involved in the implication of laws, because it's a legislative commission controlled by the legislature," attorney Ronald Zumbrun said. Zumbrun is representing Rodolphe Streichenberger's Marine Forests Society, a nonprofit group that filed suit against the Coastal Commission in 2000.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey | December 24, 2009
EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is the fifth in a series of the top stories of each year since 2000. Look for the 2005 story of the year Saturday. In danger of losing its Balboa Peninsula church to the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles in a heated court battle, St. James Church is keeping its eyes on the U.S. Supreme Court. The high court could take up a similar court case of an Anglican Church in La Crescenta that raises questions about property rights and freedom of religion.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
DENNIS L. EVANS Negative comments from Daily Pilot columnists Steve Smith and Peter Buffa illustrate the lack of knowledge of many citizens regarding the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision banning student-led prayers at school events, such as football games and assemblies. Many people who question the ruling in Santa Fe Independent School District (Texas) vs. Doe do not understand the content of the U.S. Constitution's 1st Amendment and the legal status of public schools as instruments of the government.
FEATURES
By Steven Short | July 4, 2009
With confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor scheduled to begin in mid-July, inquisitive observers of these proceedings may wish to deepen their understanding of the High Court and its place in our system of government. Users of the Newport Beach Public Library will find the following titles of supreme interest: A huge bestseller in 1979, “The Brethren,” by Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong , remains a fascinating account of the Warren Burger Court.
NEWS
October 10, 2007
Prosecuting a criminal case against student activist Benito Acosta cost the city of Costa Mesa roughly $32,000, according to information from City Attorney Kimberly Hall Barlow. Acosta was arrested at a Jan. 3, 2006, City Council meeting after protesting a plan to train city police for immigration enforcement. Orange County Superior Court Judge Kelly MacEachern dismissed the case Oct. 1 after learning City Prosecutor Dan Peelman had not been sworn in as a public prosecutor before filing the misdemeanor charges.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
Corona del Mar resident Thurmond Clarke, the cousin of Sen. Strom Thurmond, served as a U.S. District Court judge for 38 years after being appointed by President Eisenhower in 1955. Before his appointment to the district court, Clarke's most memorable ruling was a 1953 decision overturning a California law prohibiting immigrants from owning land. He ruled the law violated the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment, a decision that was upheld by the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
By Chriss Street | March 7, 2012
Xavier Alvarez, after being elected in 2007 to the Three Valleys Municipal Water District in Pomona, introduced himself at his first board meeting as a wounded war veteran who had received the Medal of Honor, our nation's highest honor. But when it was discovered that Alvarez was never wounded in action, never awarded the Medal of Honor, and never served in the military, he was prosecuted and convicted under the Stolen Valor Act of 2005 of a federal misdemeanor for falsely claiming to have received a U.S. military medal.
FEATURES
May 14, 2010
President Obama this week picked Elena Kagan to replace John Paul Stevens on the U.S. Supreme Court. With the imminent retirement of Stevens, who is a Protestant — and assuming that the Senate’s clears Kagan’s nomination — the high court bench for the first time would have no Protestants on it and would be comprised of six Catholics (Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence...
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