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NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 3, 2008
Like many of the other students in Scott Morlan’s surfing and environmental class at Newport Harbor High School, senior Brandon Guzman enjoys the mornings he and his classmates get to spend on the beach trying to catch waves — but the experience is often marred by the Styrofoam coffee cups and takeout boxes he sees bobbing in the water while paddling out. “You can actually see Styrofoam floating around out there,” he...
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 14, 2008
The Newport Beach City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to ban polystyrene products at restaurants in the city after Newport Harbor High School students lobbied city officials for several years to toss Styrofoam cups and to-go boxes out of city eateries. “I’m ecstatic,” said Newport Harbor High sophomore Ariel Kusby. “We worked so hard, and it’s amazing to see the fruit of our efforts in a world that’s mostly controlled by adults.” Students from teacher Scott Morlan’s surfing and environmental class at Newport Harbor High School have been asking the city to ban expanded polystyrene products, commonly known as Styrofoam, for about six years, Morlan said.
NEWS
May 30, 2004
They seem such little things, Styrofoam cups, to-go containers or ice chests. But they can pack an awfully big wallop on the environment. In the next few weeks, the Newport Beach City Council is expected to consider a ban on the use of Styrofoam, the trade name for polystyrene, by the city. If the council does so, it will join other cities such as San Clemente, Laguna Beach and Huntington Beach, that have made the ubiquitous, crunchy white substance a little less commonplace.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 11, 2008
The Newport Beach City Council on Tuesday will consider passing a citywide ban on polystyrene products at restaurants. The council is considering the ordinance after students from Newport Harbor High School lobbied city officials to ban polystyrene, commonly known as Styrofoam, because it pollutes local beaches. Many local restaurants use Styrofoam cups and take-out containers for to-go orders. Several Southern California cities have already adopted similar ordinances, including Laguna Beach and Santa Monica.
FEATURES
By Amanda Pennington | May 25, 2007
BALBOA PENINSULA — It only took a couple of minutes one morning recently for Scott Morlan and his surf class to gather enough Styrofoam from the beach for a small pile. The Newport Harbor High School educator, who also teaches math at the school, and his surf students routinely come across the polystyrene trash while doing beach cleanups, and it upset them enough to ask the Newport Beach City Council to do something about it. "I feel it's the No. 1 most found nasty piece of trash I find on the beach," senior student Christian Winkler, 18, said.
NEWS
May 24, 2004
June Casagrande A Styrofoam coffee cup used today could plague future generations for 500 years, which is why local environmentalists have set their sights on reducing it. The city's Coastal/Bay Water Quality Citizens Advisory Committee has sent an ordinance to the City Council that would ban the use of Styrofoam by city government, by vendors at city-sponsored events, by charter vessels and by all events that receive...
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | February 16, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — The Newport Harbor High School class that rallied the Newport Beach City Council into banning Styrofoam products in restaurants in 2008 expanded its aim and moved its focus inland — starting with Costa Mesa. The environmental surfing class is on a mission to get restaurants to ditch Styrofoam take-out containers and are asking cities to take the lead by banning the product that fills up landfills, kills wildlife and creates a mess at the beach, students said at a press conference Wednesday morning at the pier.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | June 21, 2008
From coffee cups to doggie bags, most Newport Beach restaurants depend on Styrofoam to keep soup piping hot and soft drinks icy. A proposed citywide ban on the product could leave local eateries looking for something else to serve their to-go orders in, but many restaurant owners say they are ready for a change. “Most everyone uses it because it’s so cost effective,” said Sheri Drewry, president of the Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. “But I think everybody needs to be a lot more ecologically responsibility right now.” Most local restaurant owners support the proposed ban, Drewry said.
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Think globally, act locally. That time-worn saying is apropos in Newport Beach today as the City Council will this week consider a ban on Styrofoam food containers to clean up local beaches and waterways. The idea started with a bunch of surfers from Newport Harbor High. The kids, part of longtime surf coach Scott Morlan’s team, pushed for the Styrofoam ban after years of watching the floating plastic infest the surf following winter rainstorms. Usually, such a pipe dream is difficult to see through fruition; but this time, something happened.
NEWS
September 17, 2004
Jeff Benson An array of colorful wildlife visits Upper Newport Bay every mid-September, as nesting birds move out and migratory birds move in. But something that can be seen year-round by bird watchers is the mass of trash that migrates down storm drains and the main channels and ends up on the bay's islands and marshes. Approximately 600 local volunteers, led by the Newport-Balboa Rotary Club and including several hundred Boy Scouts and high school students, will clean up trash in Upper Newport Bay Saturday to coincide with International Coastal Cleanup Day. Rotary Club member Rob Williams said that from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, these volunteers will steer shallow-water skiffs, 20-foot pontoon boats, four Boston Whalers and nearly 50 canoes to the islands.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | February 16, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — The Newport Harbor High School class that rallied the Newport Beach City Council into banning Styrofoam products in restaurants in 2008 expanded its aim and moved its focus inland — starting with Costa Mesa. The environmental surfing class is on a mission to get restaurants to ditch Styrofoam take-out containers and are asking cities to take the lead by banning the product that fills up landfills, kills wildlife and creates a mess at the beach, students said at a press conference Wednesday morning at the pier.
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NEWS
By Julie Hagy | February 15, 2010
Students in Ensign Intermediate School’s Marine Studies Club have been working on saving local waterways, removing one plastic fork at a time. The after-school club at the Newport Beach middle school is participating in the Southern California Science Fair Project competition, sponsored by the Quicksilver Foundation and USC’s Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies. This year’s competition is challenging more than 100 middle and high school teams to create, conduct and make conclusions on self-designed science projects.
FEATURES
By Brianna Bailey and Ashley Breeding | February 8, 2010
Braving soggy weather and toting metal trash pickers and plastic bags, more than 50 volunteers slogged through the streets of Newport Beach on Saturday to pick up trash out of gutters and on local beaches. The effort was part of the group ZeroTrash Newport’s fourth monthly First Saturday beach and street cleanup. “It’s pretty simple. We’re trying to promote personal responsibility,” said Eric Chevalier, one of the organizers of the Saturday cleanup effort.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 14, 2008
The Newport Beach City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to ban polystyrene products at restaurants in the city after Newport Harbor High School students lobbied city officials for several years to toss Styrofoam cups and to-go boxes out of city eateries. “I’m ecstatic,” said Newport Harbor High sophomore Ariel Kusby. “We worked so hard, and it’s amazing to see the fruit of our efforts in a world that’s mostly controlled by adults.” Students from teacher Scott Morlan’s surfing and environmental class at Newport Harbor High School have been asking the city to ban expanded polystyrene products, commonly known as Styrofoam, for about six years, Morlan said.
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Think globally, act locally. That time-worn saying is apropos in Newport Beach today as the City Council will this week consider a ban on Styrofoam food containers to clean up local beaches and waterways. The idea started with a bunch of surfers from Newport Harbor High. The kids, part of longtime surf coach Scott Morlan’s team, pushed for the Styrofoam ban after years of watching the floating plastic infest the surf following winter rainstorms. Usually, such a pipe dream is difficult to see through fruition; but this time, something happened.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 11, 2008
The Newport Beach City Council on Tuesday will consider passing a citywide ban on polystyrene products at restaurants. The council is considering the ordinance after students from Newport Harbor High School lobbied city officials to ban polystyrene, commonly known as Styrofoam, because it pollutes local beaches. Many local restaurants use Styrofoam cups and take-out containers for to-go orders. Several Southern California cities have already adopted similar ordinances, including Laguna Beach and Santa Monica.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | June 21, 2008
From coffee cups to doggie bags, most Newport Beach restaurants depend on Styrofoam to keep soup piping hot and soft drinks icy. A proposed citywide ban on the product could leave local eateries looking for something else to serve their to-go orders in, but many restaurant owners say they are ready for a change. “Most everyone uses it because it’s so cost effective,” said Sheri Drewry, president of the Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. “But I think everybody needs to be a lot more ecologically responsibility right now.” Most local restaurant owners support the proposed ban, Drewry said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | April 3, 2008
Like many of the other students in Scott Morlan’s surfing and environmental class at Newport Harbor High School, senior Brandon Guzman enjoys the mornings he and his classmates get to spend on the beach trying to catch waves — but the experience is often marred by the Styrofoam coffee cups and takeout boxes he sees bobbing in the water while paddling out. “You can actually see Styrofoam floating around out there,” he...
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | March 8, 2008
Candy wrappers. A giant light-up plastic Easter bunny. Couch cushions. Education Director Briana Madden of the nonprofit group Orange County Coastkeeper has seen it all floating in Upper Newport Bay. “What goes into the storm drain ends up as trash in the bay,” Madden said. “The tennis balls and the Styrofoam is just what we can see that’s in the water. You can’t see the oil or the fertilizers.” The group has organized two volunteer trips this year to pick up hard-to-reach trash in the bay using kayaks.
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