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NEWS
October 2, 2002
June Casagrande City planners are reconsidering their 100-foot recommendation for a Mormon temple steeple in light of new information that shows the existing stake center's steeple is shorter than city documents state. The 100-foot limit recommended by city officials late last month was a compromise between the 124-foot steeple church planners requested and the allegedly 86-foot steeple on the church's existing stake center. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints representatives have said that the temple's steeple must be more prominent than that of the stake center to reflect the building's greater religious significance.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
June Casagrande The Planning Commission is scheduled to take a final vote on a proposed Mormon temple and steeple, but chances are that tonight's vote won't be the end of the discussion. Planning commissioners could opt to postpone their decision to request more information or simply to take more time to make up their minds. If they do give an official yea or nay tonight, there's a good chance that, either way, the question could be appealed to the City Council.
NEWS
November 20, 2002
I am calling in support of the Church of Latter-Day Saints steeple temple. I am in support of it either at the compromised height of 99 feet or at the new compromised offer of 90 feet high. It is very puzzling to me why a house of worship steeple has been so controversial. We traveled in New England last summer. We visited cities and towns with numerous churches and other houses of worship. The residents would often point out to us with great pride the tallest steeple in their town.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
TONY DODERO Eastbound on Bonita Canyon Road from MacArthur Boulevard, the landmark is already a sight to behold. A 90-foot-tall, white steeple pointing toward the heavens, capped off by a golden statue of the Angel Moroni. It's not officially open for business yet -- sometime this summer is the grand-opening date -- but the new Temple for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was to be the topic at Newport-Mesa-Irvine Interfaith Council lunch on Wednesday.
NEWS
October 4, 2002
June Casagrande A Mormon temple with a 99-foot 9-inch steeple and slightly reduced hours of lighting won Planning Commission approval Thursday night, closing a chapter of the most controversial project this year. But widespread resident opposition to the modified project could land the matter in front of the City Council for a final decision. Residents for and against the temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints packed City Council chambers Thursday and spilled out onto the City Hall lawn as planning commissioners heard passionate speeches.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
It is unfortunate that lessons of old have not been learned today ("Height of Mormon steeple contradicted," Wednesday). Is there a compromise that can be reached over the height of the proposed Mormon temple? Rather than residents, city staff and church officials warring over this question, wouldn't it best be answered by God, through Jesus Christ, from whence the name "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" comes from? About 7,000 years ago, man labored in vain to build a tower that would reach to the heavens so that one king could rest his throne closer to God, to be as God, and to better oversee and rule over his subjects.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
June Casagrande A Mormon temple with a 90-foot steeple can be built on Bonita Canyon Drive, City Council members decided Tuesday. The 6-0 vote closes the final chapter of the most controversial development to come before city officials in more than a year. "This thing had the makings of a civil war, but in the end, it did not go there," Councilman Steve Bromberg said. "Everybody has taken the high road." Church officials have said they hope to begin work as soon as possible on the 17,575-square-foot temple at 2300 Bonita Canyon Drive, estimated to cost $10 million.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- Bending to public pressure, planners of a Mormon temple have extended the length of time a costly crane will stand in for a proposed 124-foot steeple. On Jan. 28, a crane will park at 2300 Bonita Canyon Drive and stay there through Feb. 1, its cherry picker stretched 124 feet into the sky to give residents a chance to gauge the effects of the steeple of the proposed temple. Representatives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will also send out letters to neighbors telling them about the opportunity to see the crane.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
It appears the long, at times bruising, debate about the proposed Mormon temple in Newport Beach is nearing its end. Given the needs of the leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the demands of residents living near the proposed temple, the Planning Commission did a laudable job with what has been a very emotional issue. The vehemence of the discussion is not surprising given that on one side are religious beliefs and the other a desire to maintain a neighborhood and property values.
NEWS
September 3, 2002
June Casagrande After months of meetings, discussions and surveys, the Mormon Temple issue is finally scheduled to come before the Planning Commission. Leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will ask commissioners on Thursday to consider their request to top off their new temple with a spire that reaches 124 feet into the sky. The steeple, the height of which includes a gold-colored angel statue, is part of the 17,500-square-foot project slated to be built at Bonita Canyon Drive and Macarthur Boulevard.
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NEWS
February 18, 2005
TONY DODERO Eastbound on Bonita Canyon Road from MacArthur Boulevard, the landmark is already a sight to behold. A 90-foot-tall, white steeple pointing toward the heavens, capped off by a golden statue of the Angel Moroni. It's not officially open for business yet -- sometime this summer is the grand-opening date -- but the new Temple for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was to be the topic at Newport-Mesa-Irvine Interfaith Council lunch on Wednesday.
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NEWS
October 15, 2003
60, Balboa Island ... Newport Beach mayor and the city's No. 1 cheerleader, whose mantra has become, "The people of Newport Beach are good people" ... An attorney by trade known for bringing diplomacy and mediation skill to the council ... Helped make peace between planners of the Mormon temple and neighbors opposed to the temple's steeple ... Led the call for Councilman Dick Nichols' resignation after Nichols made a...
NEWS
August 16, 2003
June Casagrande The first Mormon Temple in Orange County broke ground Friday, nine months after the City Council approved the construction. Weatherford Clayton, president of the Newport Beach stake center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, said the process of getting permits through the city and approving details through the church's Salt Lake City headquarters took longer than expected. "The permits are almost complete, and we hope to have everything in place very shortly, so this was the right time to break ground," Clayton said.
NEWS
December 4, 2002
June Casagrande Even before being sworn in as City Councilman, Dick Nichols has already exhibited a style of wading boldly into controversy. At the Nov. 12 council meeting, just as previously warring parties had found a harmonious compromise on the size of a Mormon temple steeple, Nichols rehashed the matter by saying he thought the steeple was too short. "Architecturally, it would have been prettier if it was 10 feet higher," Nichols said Tuesday, reaffirming his objection to lowering the steeple from about 100 to 90 feet.
NEWS
November 20, 2002
I am calling in support of the Church of Latter-Day Saints steeple temple. I am in support of it either at the compromised height of 99 feet or at the new compromised offer of 90 feet high. It is very puzzling to me why a house of worship steeple has been so controversial. We traveled in New England last summer. We visited cities and towns with numerous churches and other houses of worship. The residents would often point out to us with great pride the tallest steeple in their town.
NEWS
November 18, 2002
June Casagrande Of all the startling twists and turns in the year-long Mormon temple debate, none was more eye-opening than what was revealed at Tuesday's City Council meeting. Half the council members said they would have supported the temple with a 99-foot, 9-inch steeple. Two more offered comments of such strong support for the temple to make it a safe bet that the plan would have won majority, if not unanimous, council support. But far more remarkable: Some council members, including Mayor Tod Ridgeway, had told church planners in advance that they would have supported the higher steeple.
NEWS
November 14, 2002
The case of the proposed Mormon temple steeple is a perfect example of how neighborhood issues can be worked out with discussions, negotiations and maybe just a little bit of prayer. The steeple has been contentious since the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints proposed the new house of worship for Newport Beach, in particular the Bonita Canyon neighborhood where it will be built. For Mormons, the $10-million, 17,575-square-foot temple is a special sanctuary.
NEWS
November 14, 2002
Is city playing favorites with steeple heights? Regarding the proposed Mormon temple in Newport Beach: How does the city of Newport Beach really determine the height of church/temple steeples? Do planning commissioners and City Council members and city staff favor one faith over another? Does one church or temple literally rank above others? We would all hope not, and of course, all city officials would emphatically disavow any preference in public policy toward different faiths.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
June Casagrande A Mormon temple with a 90-foot steeple can be built on Bonita Canyon Drive, City Council members decided Tuesday. The 6-0 vote closes the final chapter of the most controversial development to come before city officials in more than a year. "This thing had the makings of a civil war, but in the end, it did not go there," Councilman Steve Bromberg said. "Everybody has taken the high road." Church officials have said they hope to begin work as soon as possible on the 17,575-square-foot temple at 2300 Bonita Canyon Drive, estimated to cost $10 million.
NEWS
November 12, 2002
Mansoor aims to improve all of Costa Mesa, not just Westside This is in response to the recent election and Geoff West's surprise that another unknown, underfunded improvement candidate got elected (Mailbag, "Time to get down to business on Westside," Friday). How could it happen? Again? Addressing his advice to Westsiders, West suggested they "tighten their focus and make some real progress on those issues they feel are critical to the improvement of their part of town."
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