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NEWS
March 18, 2003
Deirdre Newman During the competition, the golfers at the Toshiba Senior Classic may pray for a birdie. But if they need spiritual guidance, they'll turn to Tom Randall. Randall is the chaplain for the PGA Champions Tour, which swept into Newport Beach on Monday. Randall will lead a nondenominational Christian fellowship on Friday evening for the players and their families. He is also available during the week for private sessions to help the players deal with the emotions competition evoke, like anger, and to encourage patience and self-control.
FEATURES
By Daniel Tedford | February 10, 2008
Flower power met spiritual power Sunday at a one-of-a-kind church service. It was a groovy morning at the Costa Mesa Senior Center as the spirit of the 1960s was incorporated into the usual activities and religious wisdom. Donning ’60s threads with a daisy in his shirt pocket, Pastor Jim Turrell led a service about adversity and security. “It was a great opportunity to have fun,” said Turrell, who has been leading the church since 1987. “This is sort of our target market.
FEATURES
August 28, 2009
Once upon a time, when I was in Africa on a work team, we visited a Methodist clinic. The clinic was the only health-care facility for 50 miles. The clinic, funded by Methodists from all over the world, was a birth center, an emergency ward, an anti-malaria station, a school for teaching health care and prenatal care, and a hospital. The sign over the front door said, “Jesus wants us well in every way.” The sign is right. God desires us to be well in body, mind and soul.
NEWS
February 4, 2008
A groovy spiritual service will be at the Costa Mesa Senior Center Sunday. In a non-traditional format, “Love In Sunday” will celebrate the spiritual revolution of the 1960s in two services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. Yippies, hippies, bohemians, peace-niks and all others are invited. The message of the service will match that of the era in raising awareness to overcome adversity. Aesthetics will attempt to capture the era as they decorate the center. And music will also accompany the service in order to “rock your soul,” according to the event’s flier.
NEWS
August 30, 1999
Rabbi Mark Miller has been the spiritual leader of Orange County's largest synagogue, Temple Bat Yahm, in Newport Beach since 1977. He also has taught at the University of California, Irvine, for 16 years. His local volunteer work includes the presidency of the Orange County Board of Rabbis and membership on the UC Irvine Bioethics Commission. Miller helps lead spiritual worship, festival observances and other events at the temple. Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach was founded in 1973 by 12 families and serves as the center of Jewish life for the surrounding communities.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
I think Jean Nicholson may have missed the point of my letter of Jan. 1 (Mailbag, Jan. 8). She paints me as "one-sided" and accuses me of giving a negative slant on Christianity and causing confusion with some students. That is certainly not my frame of mind, nor my reputation. Of course, I give both sides in my history class. I personally think Jesus and his teachings are marvelous examples of how we should treat each other, and point this out regularly in class, although I am careful not to impose my religious beliefs on my students.
NEWS
By Lauren Vane | March 12, 2006
Just feet from the runway of John Wayne Airport, people of all realms took off on a flight of a different kind Saturday at the Holistic Living Expo at the Radisson Newport Beach. From psychic readings to raw food preparation, vendors displayed their out-of-this-world products designed to cultivate a more fruitful and spiritual life. Fabienne Marneau, a hypnotist at the expo for her first time, specializes in soul paintings ? a picture of one's soul. "I can see the soul of my clients," Marneau said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanna Clay | March 13, 2010
On one episode of Bravo’s “Millionaire Matchmaker,” a Newport Beach bachelor was searching for love in all the wrong places. Mateo Stasior is an original Microsoft millionaire, bumping elbows with guys like Bill Gates. The first 10 minutes of the episode shows Mateo typing away on the sand at his beachfront home and pulling up to valet at Newport Beach Tennis Club. All he needs is the perfect partner for his posh life. In his audition tape, Mateo left no stone unturned.
NEWS
March 15, 2003
Suzie Harrison Her life crashed. She had a failed marriage, no career path, no resources and two tiny babies. Some would have been left emotionally bankrupt and turn to drinking or drugs -- but not Jeanette Smith. She turned toward a different path to glue the fragile pieces of her life together. "I really thought it was the end of the line," Smith said. Then she turned to the book "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," by Mary Baker Eddy, a book that she had grown up with.
NEWS
July 2, 2003
One of the most painful aspects of life is death. Most people fear it and keep it at arms length. For Ruth Dutro, death is a welcome subject. "People think I am crazy when I say that death is beautiful," she says. At an age when most people are well into their retirement, Dutro spends 40 to 50 hours per week volunteering as a chaplain for Companion Hospice. Though nurses, social workers, aides and volunteers at Companion use medicine and psychology to make a patient's last days as physically comfortable as possible, there is still one need that must be met -- the spiritual.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | April 25, 2014
Q: What can you say to a 16-year-old boy who's an atheist? My wife and I were both brought up as Catholics, and we raised our two sons that way. They had all the appropriate sacraments — baptism, first communion, confirmation, etc. After the younger son, who's now declared himself an atheist, made his confirmation, we gave both boys some leeway in regard to attending Mass. While my wife was raised to think of herself as Catholic, in truth she does not practice and neither did her family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | January 31, 2013
A major spiritual milestone is coming up this month. We can call it the year 20 A.P. That A.P. stands for "After Phil" — or Phil Connors, the protagonist of the Bill Murray comedy "Groundhog Day. " How many other movies starring "Saturday Night Live" alums go on to factor into religious teachings? Probably none. But that Murray classic, which came out 20 Groundhog Days ago, seems to have carved out a niche all its own. Do I need to summarize the movie's plot? Even those who haven't seen it must have heard it referenced — for instance, when a friend snipes about the redundancy of his job and adds that it's "like 'Groundhog Day.'" Dictionary.com defines the term two ways: one as the actual holiday, the other as "a situation in which events are or appear to be continually repeated.
NEWS
By Norris Burkes and By Norris Burkes | November 23, 2012
November is a month most of us express thanks for all that we have — for home, family, friends and faith. But that was "so yesterday!" Now, Thanksgiving seems to be only a speed bump slowing us before our holiday buying frenzy, while the turkey and stuffing fueled our race toward the Black Friday sales. If this holiday track meet left you frazzled, I want to offer you a choice of two very different running lanes. First, you can align yourself with denial and tell yourself that you are only spending more this year so that you'll have more to be thankful over next year.
NEWS
By Norris Burkes and By Norris Burkes | November 16, 2012
This is the "morning after" in our political world and many voting Americans are waking up with the disappointment that their candidate didn't win. If this election left your political dreams thwarted, take heart — there is a chance to vote again. Don't worry; I'm not promoting voter fraud. I'm suggesting that you vote with your actions because the best place for people of faith to make a difference will never be in the voting booth. It will be in places of service like churches, schools, hospitals and homeless shelters.
NEWS
By Norris Burkes and By Norris Burkes | November 2, 2012
Have you ever visited a faith community for the wrong reasons? I have, more than once. I made my most memorable trip during my opening sophomore week at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. I'd spent my freshman year floating between churches, so I decided to get serious about church attendance. Besides, church membership fit my career goal of becoming a pastor. Funny how that works. The choice required little effort because Waco churches catered to Baylor students by scheduling Sunday buses to pick up students in front of the dormitories.
NEWS
By Deborah Barrett | May 11, 2012
Beach reading, professional journals, vacation reading, classics, the Daily Pilot — our pile of things to read is stacked high. Those with electronic reading devices may not have the physical clutter, but the challenge to find time to read is the same. Besides entertainment, professional development or keeping up with the news, reading may also be a vital spiritual practice. Many Americans describe themselves as "spiritual" rather than "religious," emphasizing a preference for personal experience and responsibility over affiliation with a religious organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller, The Chicago Tribune | February 9, 2012
Before I read "The Translation of the Bones" (Scribner) by Francesca Kay, I had three favorite novels on spiritual topics. Now I have four. Kay's fiercely lyrical yet exceedingly tough-minded novel about a tragedy precipitated by a would-be spiritual awakening is easily fit to join "In This House of Brede" (1969) by Rumer Godden; "Mariette in Ecstasy" (1991) by Ron Hansen; and "Be Near Me" (2006) by Andrew O'Hagan. The books by Godden, Hansen and O'Hagan — and now Kay — reward rereading on account of their beautiful prose, their complex exploration of religious thought and their subtle understanding of the human yearning after something larger than ourselves, often conducted under a sky "so blue that it made all dreams seem continuous," as O'Hagan writes.
NEWS
By Tom L. Thorkelson | February 3, 2012
In my work in the interfaith community over nearly 30 years, whenever the subject of religion has come up, I've often heard this comment: "Well, I am not religious, but I am spiritual. " My immediate reaction was to wonder what the speaker meant by that. Was he or she raised in a religious environment but still considered themselves a "good person" after having rejected the teachings of their family's faith? Was that person rejecting "organized religion" generally? Did he or she see some who claimed to be religious as being hypocritical?
NEWS
By Jim Turrell | January 20, 2012
I have always been captivated by how humanity explains its presence in the world and how it views itself in the universe. If we go by most accepted historical facts, humanity as we know it, modern homo sapiens, began on the planet some 40,000 to 60,000 years ago, during which there were several ice ages, many floods and a lot of dark cold nights. Each generation had to feed itself, create communities to protect itself and figure out the cycles of the seasons, the sun and, most importantly, the moon.
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