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NEWS
By Miranda K. Andersen | October 23, 2013
The new school year is in full swing and it's time to review your child's Individual Education Plan. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, guarantees special education for children who have disabilities. For parents of a special-needs child, an Individual Education Plan, or IEP, is the foundation for their child to excel in school and benefit from their education. Often parents of special-needs children become overwhelmed in the special-education process as they learn about their child's disability and how to achieve the best education for that child.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | January 11, 2012
Local businesses, agencies and nonprofits are coming to together for one night to show Newport-Mesa residents all the resources they have at their fingertips. Newport-Mesa Unified's Community Advisory Committee for Special Education is hosting a free Family Resource Fair from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Jan. 25 at Estancia High School, 2323 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa. The annual fair is meant to empower families — both typical and special education — through resources they might not be aware of, said Ann Huntington, the district's executive director of special education.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | December 14, 2007
The Newport-Mesa school district can find neither the people to fill special-educator positions nor the money to better fund the programs for special-education students, Supt. Jeff Hubbard told parents Thursday. Hubbard responded to a number of complaints and concerns from parents of special-education children. He and the parents’ advisory committee convened solely to answer the parents’ questions. Hubbard pledged district staff will develop an account to-the-dollar of its expenditures in special education for all parents who wanted one. Newport-Mesa is one of the costliest special-education programs in the county and is significantly under-budgeted compared to state averages, according to a recent audit of the district.
NEWS
July 12, 2005
Wendy Leece This wee,k we asked our parent panelists: A report found that the Newport-Mesa Unified School District pays far more for special-education teaching than the average school district in the state. Why do you think this is, and is there any reason for parents to worry that money is being taken from other parts of the district to pay for these classes? From stories I have heard, I believe our district goes the extra mile to provide a quality education for most Newport-Mesa children in its special education programs.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | July 26, 2007
A former Newport Harbor High School special education teacher has filed a complaint with the state and school board, claiming that administrators mistreated her and her colleagues and denied a proper education to special-needs students. Sandra Sutherland, who taught at Newport Harbor from March through December last year, mailed her statement Monday to the Newport-Mesa board of trustees and the state Department of Education's complaint management office. Among her claims are that Newport Harbor administrators burdened special education teachers with excessive amounts of students, prevented them from adequately monitoring those students, and dismissed Sutherland from her job without explanation.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
Marisa O'Neil State and federal funding has not kept pace with rising numbers of special education students and the costs associated with caring for them, a state consultant told school board officials Tuesday. As a result, special education budgets eat into general education money, explained Paul Goldfinger, vice president of the Sacramento consulting firm School Services of California. Goldfinger spoke at a special study session the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustees held to learn more about special education issues.
NEWS
June 30, 2005
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District paid nearly double the average state percentage for its special-education programs last year, according to a report issued by School Services of California. At the district's board meeting Tuesday, school services vice president Paul Goldfinger and educational consultant Sharon Popp presented the results of a two-month study they conducted of Newport-Mesa's special-education programs. In April, district officials had contacted a group in Sacramento help determine how to lower special-education costs in the coming years.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
The Newport-Mesa school board received its annual independent auditor’s report Tuesday, this year conducted by third-party company Vavrinek, Trine, Day & Co. LLP. The company credited the board for maintaining specialized programs and services despite a reduction in state funding. The district dipped into its general fund significantly, $21.8 million worth, to fund special education in the district. That’s nearly 60% more in expenses than the district is allocated for special education funding.
NEWS
February 27, 2002
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-MESA -- School district officials said they won't have to scramble to comply with a federal ruling that provides special education students extra help on the high school exit exam because the ruling mirrors their ongoing efforts. The ruling, handed down Thursday, allows students to use modifications such as a calculator and spell-checker and will require portions of the test to be read aloud if these things are already part of a student's individual education plan.
NEWS
February 4, 2002
Deirdre Newman NEWPORT-MESA -- Revamping the way special education programs are delivered may be an answer to solving some of the district's budget woes, an advisory committee told the school board in its final report of the year. The encroachment of special education mandates eats up a significant portion of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District's general budget each year. Encroachment occurs when the state or federal government mandates certain programs, but does not provide the funds to implement them.
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NEWS
By Miranda K. Andersen | October 23, 2013
The new school year is in full swing and it's time to review your child's Individual Education Plan. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, guarantees special education for children who have disabilities. For parents of a special-needs child, an Individual Education Plan, or IEP, is the foundation for their child to excel in school and benefit from their education. Often parents of special-needs children become overwhelmed in the special-education process as they learn about their child's disability and how to achieve the best education for that child.
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NEWS
November 21, 2012
Raymond Hurt Jr. Born 1/31/1931 in San Pedro, Ca. died 11/15/2012 He worked as a longshoreman/checker on the docks of Long Beach and Los Angeles for 52 yrs. While there he got his education at Cal State Long Beach and went on to teach special education at Estancia High School in Costa Mesa, CA for 20 years. He leaves behind his wife Stephany, 3 children from his first marriage, Raymond (Skip) Hurt of Tuftonboro NH, Robert Hurt of Missoula MT  and Pamela Arroues of Helena MT, 14 grand kids and 1 great-grand child.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | August 22, 2012
A majority of Newport-Mesa Unified sophomores passed the statewide high school exit exam last year, according to data released Wednesday. Eighty-eight percent of local sophomores who took the California High School Exit Exam, or CAHSEE, passed. That puts the district as a whole on par with Orange County and above the state as a whole, according to the state Department of Education. "We consider the CAHSEE one of many data points we utilize to measure success in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District," said Charles Hinman, assistant superintendent of secondary education.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | January 11, 2012
Local businesses, agencies and nonprofits are coming to together for one night to show Newport-Mesa residents all the resources they have at their fingertips. Newport-Mesa Unified's Community Advisory Committee for Special Education is hosting a free Family Resource Fair from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Jan. 25 at Estancia High School, 2323 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa. The annual fair is meant to empower families — both typical and special education — through resources they might not be aware of, said Ann Huntington, the district's executive director of special education.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams, lauren.williams@latimes.com | May 4, 2011
Editor's note: This corrects Stacy Lynne de Boom-Howard's name. COSTA MESA — The small, residential street of Santa Clara Circle was quiet Wednesday, with few signs that two people had been slain there the night before. Two yellow tarps were draped in front of Robert Lehmann's modest, single-story house. A thin trail of blood had dried and was crusted on the path that led to the well-manicured lawn, which police had taped off. A brown truck parked in the driveway had the license plate "Dady ♥ AJ. " Costa Mesa police detectives returned to the scene in the 3400 block during the day Wednesday to see if they could spot anything they might have initially missed after the fatal shooting Tuesday night, said Lt. Bryan Glass.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | October 13, 2010
COSTA MESA — The Newport-Mesa Unified school board on Tuesday night approved a one-year contract with the teachers union but also outlined issues with the state budget expected to impact the district. The Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers Local 1794 reached an agreement with district in September and overwhelmingly ratified a one-year contract in which teachers would see no pay raises but no salary reductions. Both Kimberly Claytor, the president of the union, and the district's negotiator, John Caldecott, director of human resources, were commended by the seven-member school board and Supt.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | March 17, 2010
Every Thursday, they’ve got something to look forward to, this set of children who are occasionally overlooked by society or shucked by the wayside. Like clockwork right about lunch, students break out of their natural confines and mix it up with special-education kids in a scene that could easily be mistaken for plain old-fashioned fun. But look deeper within, and ask a few more questions, and you’ll soon realize that there’s a lasting relationship being built here on the Corona del Mar High School campus — and both sets of students are learning from one another in ways great and small.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | February 11, 2010
Roughly 80 teachers, many of them young and fresh out of college, may lose their jobs through budget cuts proposed by the Newport-Mesa Unified School District administration and approved Tuesday night by the board of education. In all, more than 100 full-time positions, both classified and certificated, are slated to be cut from the district’s elementary and secondary levels to shore up a $13.5-million loss in state funding, according to the proposal. On Wednesday, the district was preparing to notify those teachers and administrators targeted by the cuts while Kimberly Claytor, president of the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers, was simultaneously trying to save their jobs.
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