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NEWS
June 14, 2003
June Casagrande There's no such thing as a healthy tan. That's the message Dr. Nancy Silverberg would most like to get across as the summer season begins and Newport-Mesa residents start hitting the beach, riding the waves or setting sail. As skin cancer awareness month began Thursday, Silverberg, a Newport Beach dermatologist and staff doctor at Hoag Hospital, is trying to get the word out about how outdoor enthusiasts can reduce their risk for this potentially deadly disease.
FEATURES
June 22, 2006
Summer officially started early Wednesday, and so before anyone gets a slash from a stingray or pulled out to sea in a riptide, here's a reminder of a few safety tips that will keep you in action this summer instead of on the sidelines. First, if you're going out in the sun, wear sunscreen. A recent Mayo Clinic study finds that it takes just five serious sunburns to double ? yes double ? your risk of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Are there many among us who have spent time along the beach and not had that many burns ?
NEWS
March 9, 2005
Lindsay Sandham Although legendary film star John Wayne passed away 26 years ago, his name and his legend live on through his many descendants and the research and development that comes out of the John Wayne Cancer Institute. Anita Swift of Costa Mesa is the oldest of Wayne's 24 grandchildren. Her mother, Toni, was from "the first batch" of Wayne children -- he had seven from two marriages. Swift took a position on the board of the John Wayne Cancer Institute four years ago, after her mother died of lung cancer.
NEWS
July 5, 2004
Alicia Robinson When Jeff Crane was diagnosed with skin cancer two decades ago, he hoped it wouldn't spread, but an idea grew as a result. The Newport Beach entrepreneur's experience with cancer spurred him to develop a better sunscreen to protect his children and anyone who is active outdoors. After several years spent developing Get It On sunscreen, Crane recently began selling it in surf shops and drug stores. Crane grew up in Newport Beach and spent much of his time outdoors.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
Alicia Robinson Young sun worshipers' access to indoor tanning -- and a large segment of tanning salons' business -- is being threatened by a bill moving through Sacramento. If the bill -- introduced by 6th District Assemblyman Joe Nation -- passes, people under 18 would be barred from tanning salons without a doctor's prescription. The bill passed the state Assembly in mid-May, and the Senate Business and Professions Committee will hold a hearing on the bill June 14. "We know for a fact that skin cancer occurs in some cases because of the overexposure to UV radiation in the early years, so this bill is intended to minimize the exposure to UV radiation of children when they're at their most vulnerable," Nation said.
NEWS
February 7, 2000
Richard Dunn Masters runner Dave Parsel is living proof that tragedy can turn to treasure. A former Estancia High and Orange Coast College football player, Parsel never missed a game until breaking his leg at the end of his sophomore year at OCC. As part of his rehabilitation, Parsel, a small-framed wide receiver, started jogging. Next thing you know, he's entering a 5K race and a distance runner is born. Fast forward to 1997, about 20 years later.
NEWS
By SUSAN MENNING | November 7, 2006
Joel Myres was a second-year UC Irvine medical student when, in 2001, he discovered a lump in his abdomen. The same doctors who were his teachers made the devastating diagnosis: malignant melanoma, a recurrence of the deadly skin cancer that first appeared as a mole on Joel's neck when he was 16. Myres died a year later, leaving a wife, the promise of a brilliant medical career and a legacy: He inspired other medical students at UCI to educate youths...
FEATURES
By PETER BUFFA | July 22, 2007
Used to be cool. Now it's not. There was a time, not long ago, when having a golden tan was just about as hot as cool could be. Now? Apparently it is the most dangerous thing a person can do. Apparently your body and mind need a certain amount of sunlight, but baking in the stuff is asking for trouble, to say nothing of skin cancer. Ideally you should wear a huge floppy hat and use sunscreen at all times, preferably SPF 120 or higher. This all came clear to me the other day while I was driving along and noticed how many tanning salons there are in our corner of the universe, which is a lot, which tells me people are taking all the warnings about how the sun and your skin are not friends seriously.
LOCAL
By Kelly Strodl | June 25, 2007
BALBOA PENINSULA — Nearly 600 children blanketed the sand south of the Balboa Pier Monday as part of the 24th annual Newport Junior Lifeguard training program orientation. And that was only the afternoon shift. A morning class meets from 9 a.m. to noon and the other class meets from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Over the next eight months, children ages 9 to 12 will learn a number of beach survival skills and build self-confidence and self-reliance, especially in the water.
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FEATURES
By PETER BUFFA | July 22, 2007
Used to be cool. Now it's not. There was a time, not long ago, when having a golden tan was just about as hot as cool could be. Now? Apparently it is the most dangerous thing a person can do. Apparently your body and mind need a certain amount of sunlight, but baking in the stuff is asking for trouble, to say nothing of skin cancer. Ideally you should wear a huge floppy hat and use sunscreen at all times, preferably SPF 120 or higher. This all came clear to me the other day while I was driving along and noticed how many tanning salons there are in our corner of the universe, which is a lot, which tells me people are taking all the warnings about how the sun and your skin are not friends seriously.
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LOCAL
By Kelly Strodl | June 27, 2007
BALBOA PENINSULA — Nearly 600 children blanketed the sand south of the Balboa Pier Monday as part of the 24th annual Newport Junior Lifeguard training program orientation. And that was only the afternoon shift. A morning class meets from 9 a.m. to noon and the other class meets from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Over the next eight months, children ages 9 to 12 will learn a number of beach survival skills and build self-confidence and self-reliance, especially in the water.
FEATURES
By Jessie Brunner | January 24, 2007
Before enrolling her three daughters into the Newport-Mesa Unified School District several years ago, Kristi Frisby wanted to know more about the schools near her Costa Mesa home. But the first thing she heard about from fellow parents was local crossing guard Celine Allen, who celebrated her 20th year serving Newport-Mesa students on Tuesday. Children, parents and teachers from Woodland Elementary School and Kaiser Elementary School showered her with flowers and treats on their way to and from school to mark the occasion.
NEWS
By SUSAN MENNING | November 7, 2006
Joel Myres was a second-year UC Irvine medical student when, in 2001, he discovered a lump in his abdomen. The same doctors who were his teachers made the devastating diagnosis: malignant melanoma, a recurrence of the deadly skin cancer that first appeared as a mole on Joel's neck when he was 16. Myres died a year later, leaving a wife, the promise of a brilliant medical career and a legacy: He inspired other medical students at UCI to educate youths...
FEATURES
June 22, 2006
Summer officially started early Wednesday, and so before anyone gets a slash from a stingray or pulled out to sea in a riptide, here's a reminder of a few safety tips that will keep you in action this summer instead of on the sidelines. First, if you're going out in the sun, wear sunscreen. A recent Mayo Clinic study finds that it takes just five serious sunburns to double ? yes double ? your risk of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Are there many among us who have spent time along the beach and not had that many burns ?
NEWS
March 9, 2005
Lindsay Sandham Although legendary film star John Wayne passed away 26 years ago, his name and his legend live on through his many descendants and the research and development that comes out of the John Wayne Cancer Institute. Anita Swift of Costa Mesa is the oldest of Wayne's 24 grandchildren. Her mother, Toni, was from "the first batch" of Wayne children -- he had seven from two marriages. Swift took a position on the board of the John Wayne Cancer Institute four years ago, after her mother died of lung cancer.
NEWS
July 5, 2004
Alicia Robinson When Jeff Crane was diagnosed with skin cancer two decades ago, he hoped it wouldn't spread, but an idea grew as a result. The Newport Beach entrepreneur's experience with cancer spurred him to develop a better sunscreen to protect his children and anyone who is active outdoors. After several years spent developing Get It On sunscreen, Crane recently began selling it in surf shops and drug stores. Crane grew up in Newport Beach and spent much of his time outdoors.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
Alicia Robinson Young sun worshipers' access to indoor tanning -- and a large segment of tanning salons' business -- is being threatened by a bill moving through Sacramento. If the bill -- introduced by 6th District Assemblyman Joe Nation -- passes, people under 18 would be barred from tanning salons without a doctor's prescription. The bill passed the state Assembly in mid-May, and the Senate Business and Professions Committee will hold a hearing on the bill June 14. "We know for a fact that skin cancer occurs in some cases because of the overexposure to UV radiation in the early years, so this bill is intended to minimize the exposure to UV radiation of children when they're at their most vulnerable," Nation said.
NEWS
June 14, 2003
June Casagrande There's no such thing as a healthy tan. That's the message Dr. Nancy Silverberg would most like to get across as the summer season begins and Newport-Mesa residents start hitting the beach, riding the waves or setting sail. As skin cancer awareness month began Thursday, Silverberg, a Newport Beach dermatologist and staff doctor at Hoag Hospital, is trying to get the word out about how outdoor enthusiasts can reduce their risk for this potentially deadly disease.
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