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Sign Language

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NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 5, 2006
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District, which includes Spanish, French and even Latin among its foreign-language courses, plans to add sign language to its curriculum for the upcoming school year. "We're looking to provide more options for our kids, sign language being one," Navarro said.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | October 7, 2005
In Barbara Granoff's business model, sign language is not only for the hearing impaired. "The Big Surprise" is the first DVD in what Granoff hopes will be a series called "Sign-A-Lot." The 30-minute program features a cast of ebullient children who are joined by two animated gloves named "Lulu Lefty" and "Ronnie Righty." The DVD was released Sept. 12 by Granoff's Newport Beach-based company, See Me Sign LLC. In the first weeks since the video's release, Granoff said she has been relying on word-of-mouth marketing.
NEWS
November 20, 2001
Deirdre Newman Most kindergartners know the sound the letter "t" makes. Carol Jewell's students at Andersen Elementary School, however, also know the letter "t" in sign language and can sign a host of words that start with that letter. Jewell uses sign language to enhance learning of the alphabet, phonics and number sense. Because children absorb information in different ways, sign language provides another opportunity for understanding, Jewell explained.
NEWS
December 2, 1999
Danette Goulet One by one, the students in Carol Jewell's third-grade class silently introduced themselves to their pen pal, Danielle Berman. She nodded and smiled in perfect understanding. While Jewell is teaching her students at Andersen Elementary School to read and write, she is also teaching them Danielle's language -- sign language. Danielle is 9 years old and has been deaf since birth. Despite an initial shyness Wednesday morning, Danielle quickly warmed up to the eager 8-year-olds who huddled around her, each trying to sign their many questions to her. "I asked her what kinds of books she likes to read," said Sarah Colgate.
NEWS
By: Michael Miller | October 11, 2005
It began like any other foreign language class -- with the most basic sentence in communication. The students in room 12 at Woodland Elementary School took turns introducing themselves to the rest of the class: "My name is Kaitlyn," "My name is Laura," back and forth it went. There was only one twist -- as the students spoke, the classroom was dead silent. That was because rather than French or Spanish or Arabic, the children were learning to say their names in sign language.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Young Chang Even while recovering from a fever and a bout of pink eye, 2-year-old Shira Granoff communicates that her doll -- which she calls "baby" -- needs to return to her home because she needs a toothbrush. The hearing and verbal Shira, through a mixture of words and sign language, says that the truck that rolls by every morning to collect trash scares her. It's too loud. She asks whether she can eat her valentine candy though it's still early in the morning.
NEWS
By: Sarah Hill | August 24, 2005
Swinging her long pink dreadlocks and tapping her black boot, TL Forsberg sang along to pounding drums, surging guitars and the sound of her own commanding voice that she had recorded earlier that day in Jaggo studios in Los Angeles. The 34-year-old singer and songwriter from Burbank has been hearing impaired since childhood. "I get the opportunity to dispel myths about deaf people, what they look like, what the talk like," she said. Forsberg is in the midst or recording several tracks for a demo album, which she hopes will eventually be experienced by hearing and deaf audiences alike, that will include bottom end frequencies that produce greater vibrations and have visual components like a DVD that includes the lyrics in sign language.
NEWS
May 10, 2003
Coral Wilson Casey R. Weber walks, eats and studies alongside his classmates at Orange Coast College, but because he is deaf, he said, he lives in a completely different world. "I have always wondered about who I really was," Weber said. "Sometimes, I ask myself, 'Who am I? What is the purpose of my being alive?'" People shy away from him or walk away, embarrassed and awkward, leaving him feeling lonely. The 25-year-old student is young, healthy and goal-driven, but he said the feeling of separation is sometimes overwhelming.
LOCAL
By Jennifer BaumanFor OCLNN.com | April 9, 2010
I spent a couple of hours locked inside the Orange County Central Jail complex in Santa Ana, even though I didn’t commit a crime. I was a guest, invited to join some county officials for a behind-the-scenes tour of the Intake/Release Center, as well as the Central Men’s Jail. Unfortunately, I wasn’t allowed to shoot video or take photographs because of security concerns, so I can’t show you what it looked like behind bars, but I can tell you how it felt.
NEWS
April 8, 2003
Christine Carrillo Getting a group of kindergartners to sing in unison isn't the easiest task, but for Carol Jewell, it wasn't enough of a challenge. She decided that, not only would she get them to sing together, she'd get them to sign the words as they sang them. "A told B, B told C, 'I'll meet you at the top of the coconut tree,'" Jewell's early bird class at Andersen Elementary School in Newport Beach sang together as their hands signed right along.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | November 16, 2013
There's a scene in the musical "Ivy + Bean," a South Coast Repertory production based on the well-loved children's books, in which the actors playing the parents of one of the title characters mime an entire conversation. It's an inside joke with the audience - made up largely of kids between the ages of 4 and 10 - meant to convey that the strict "mom" is reminding the easier-going "dad" that he needs to lay down the law to their rambunctious daughter. It's an effective moment that provokes giggles from the tykes in the crowd, and knowing laughter from their parents.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | May 3, 2011
CORONA DEL MAR — Practicing a language isn't only about working on the right accent or rolling the tongue to make an "r" sound. While most language classes are filled with cultural dances and foods, as well as the idea of visiting exotic locales, American Sign Language's cultural aspect is limited in comparison. Instead, the students get a chance to go behind the curtain of the deaf community and find out that they aren't so different from them. "Deaf people can do anything other people can do, but hear," said junior Nicole Roberts, 18, who is taking the beginning course.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | June 15, 2010
She knew sign language and would often sign while she played the piano and sang. It was the epitome of multitasking, and even though her students were just kindergartners, she tried to pass on these attributes to them through the years. But on Monday, Andersen Elementary in Newport Beach "lost a legend" in Carol Jewell, who taught at the school for more than two decades but died of cancer after a two-year battle, Principal Mary Manos said Tuesday. Jewell was 68. "It's so sad," Manos said.
LOCAL
By Jennifer BaumanFor OCLNN.com | April 9, 2010
I spent a couple of hours locked inside the Orange County Central Jail complex in Santa Ana, even though I didn’t commit a crime. I was a guest, invited to join some county officials for a behind-the-scenes tour of the Intake/Release Center, as well as the Central Men’s Jail. Unfortunately, I wasn’t allowed to shoot video or take photographs because of security concerns, so I can’t show you what it looked like behind bars, but I can tell you how it felt.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | May 7, 2008
Newport-Mesa Unified School District Supt. Jeffrey Hubbard has decided to extend a deaf and hard of hearing program at Costa Mesa High School for non-Newport-Mesa students, a spokeswoman for the district said Tuesday. The program was originally going to change as to allow only Newport-Mesa students at the end of the year because a number of Santa Ana students enrolled in the program were returning to their home district. That would have forced students who live in districts other than Newport-Mesa to find a new program for the next school year.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | April 18, 2008
Scott Surico likes that his 6-year-old hearing-impaired son, Joshua, can attend classes at Kaiser Elementary School in Costa Mesa because his special education teachers there make sure he learns how to listen and speak without sign language or lip-reading. It’s the only program of its kind in the area. But now it’s going to be dismantled — another casualty of the cratering economy. Kaiser’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing program will be phased out by the 2009-10 school year because the majority of its students who hail from the Santa Ana School District are being pulled out so they can attend a similar program in that district at Taft Elementary School in Santa Ana. Because the amount of state funding a district receives is based on its number of students, that means the money will be shifted to Santa Ana and out of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 5, 2006
The Newport-Mesa Unified School District, which includes Spanish, French and even Latin among its foreign-language courses, plans to add sign language to its curriculum for the upcoming school year. "We're looking to provide more options for our kids, sign language being one," Navarro said.
NEWS
By: Michael Miller | October 11, 2005
It began like any other foreign language class -- with the most basic sentence in communication. The students in room 12 at Woodland Elementary School took turns introducing themselves to the rest of the class: "My name is Kaitlyn," "My name is Laura," back and forth it went. There was only one twist -- as the students spoke, the classroom was dead silent. That was because rather than French or Spanish or Arabic, the children were learning to say their names in sign language.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | October 7, 2005
In Barbara Granoff's business model, sign language is not only for the hearing impaired. "The Big Surprise" is the first DVD in what Granoff hopes will be a series called "Sign-A-Lot." The 30-minute program features a cast of ebullient children who are joined by two animated gloves named "Lulu Lefty" and "Ronnie Righty." The DVD was released Sept. 12 by Granoff's Newport Beach-based company, See Me Sign LLC. In the first weeks since the video's release, Granoff said she has been relying on word-of-mouth marketing.
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