Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsSewage
IN THE NEWS

Sewage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 24, 2013
A 12- to 16-inch-high geyser of sewage poured into a Newport Beach storm drain and led to the closing of a piece of the coastline Friday, according to county and city officials. Residents called Newport Beach officials Friday about 8 a.m. to report that sewage was backing up onto Surrey Drive, a residential street in the Cameo Highlands neighborhood, said George Murdoch, Newport's utilities general manager. About 1,000 gallons spilled out, but crews were able to collect about 750 gallons before the rest made its way into the storm drain and flowed into the ocean at the nearby Cameo Shores Beach, said Larry Honeybourne of the Orange County Health Care Agency.
OCNOW
By Amy Senk, Corona del Mar Today | August 22, 2012
Warning signs about unsafe water once again were posted near Balboa Island after a small sewage leak occurred during repair work Tuesday afternoon, according to Corona del Mar Today . Dredging equipment previously damaged a sewer line near the Balboa Yacht Club on Aug. 15, causing 2,800 gallons of sewage to spill in the bay. The Orange County Ocean Water Protection Program agency placed warning signs in the area, advising swimmers and others...
NEWS
January 18, 2002
CORONA DEL MAR -- About 3,000 gallons of sewage that included construction materials such as paint and drywall forced the closure of Little Corona beach Wednesday. Orange County Health Care Agency officials said the raw sewage spilled Monday and flowed into Buck Gully, eventually winding up at the beach. A blocked line operated by the Irvine Ranch Water District caused the closure, which was announced at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday. The beach remained closed Thursday as investigators with both public agencies worked to determine the spill's cause.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Alex Coolman Perfect waves turned perfectly foul Tuesday as raw sewage poured into the ocean at the mouth of the Santa Ana River, forcing a beach closure from the Talbert channel to Orange Street in Newport Beach. Starting at about 5 a.m., 3,000 to 5,000 gallons of sewage spilled from a Orange County Sanitation District line, said Monica Mazur of the Orange County Health Care Agency. The spill was caused by a broken pipe near the pump station at Harbor Boulevard and Gisler Avenue in Costa Mesa, said Michelle Tuchman, spokeswoman for the sanitation district.
NEWS
July 20, 2002
Paul Clinton Newport-Mesa -- Less than two full days after agreeing to fully treat its waste water, water-quality regulators ordered the Orange County Sanitation District to immediately reduce bacteria levels using industrial bleach. The Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board unanimously approved changes in the agency's ocean discharge permit, at a Friday meeting, that directs the district to begin bleaching by Aug. 12 and tightens monitoring standards for bacteria levels in the waste plume.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
Alex Coolman A Surfrider Foundation report has handed out mediocre grades to the agencies that handle sewage for the Newport-Mesa area. The environmental group's report, released Tuesday, is a comparison of all the agencies in Orange County that handle sewage. The study notes how well they managed to transport the stuff between January 1996 and July 2000, and how often they spilled it. Such spills, which can create elevated levels of bacteria in ocean water, are one of the more visible causes of beach closures and the posting of warnings about contamination hazards.
NEWS
May 12, 2000
Surfers and swimmers were allowed back on the beach Thursday when county officials deemed the waters safe from traces of a sewage spill earlier this week. The shoreline was closed Tuesday between Orange Street in Newport Beach and Talbert Channel in Huntington Beach after about 5,000 gallons of sewage flowed into the ocean near the Santa Ana River mouth. The cause was a broken pipe at an Orange County Sanitation District pump house in Costa Mesa. County health officials conducted tests to determine contamination levels.
NEWS
August 29, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- City officials expect to join other coastal cities next month in a drive to hamper the Orange County Sanitation District's ability to dump treated sewage into the ocean. On Tuesday, Councilman Tod Ridgeway vowed to work to end a federal waiver allowing the district to discharge sewage that doesn't meet Clean Water Act standards. The district pumps 243 million gallons of partially treated sewage into the Pacific each day from an "outfall" pipe on the ocean floor.
NEWS
June 1, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT-MESA -- A bill that would require the Orange County Sanitation District to step up the treatment of its sewage has sailed through the state Assembly. The legislation, known as Assembly Bill 1969, passed in that house of the Legislature on a 62-8 vote on Wednesday evening. It now moves to the Senate for approval. Author Ken Maddox, whose new district in November will include Costa Mesa, praised the overwhelming support for the legislation, which would also short-circuit the district's attempt to renew a federal waiver that would keep treatment levels status quo. The district dumps 240-million gallons of partially treated sewage into the ocean each day via an outfall pipe leading 4 1/2 miles out to sea. City officials suspect this plume of sewage is contributing to bacteria contamination in the surf zone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2013
A 12- to 16-inch-high geyser of sewage poured into a Newport Beach storm drain and led to the closing of a piece of the coastline Friday, according to county and city officials. Residents called Newport Beach officials Friday about 8 a.m. to report that sewage was backing up onto Surrey Drive, a residential street in the Cameo Highlands neighborhood, said George Murdoch, Newport's utilities general manager. About 1,000 gallons spilled out, but crews were able to collect about 750 gallons before the rest made its way into the storm drain and flowed into the ocean at the nearby Cameo Shores Beach, said Larry Honeybourne of the Orange County Health Care Agency.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 28, 2013
A stretch of Newport Bay that had been closed to swimmers and divers because of a sewage spill reopened Friday, according to the Orange County Health Care Agency, which monitors water quality. The ocean was closed earlier this week along a half-mile stretch of beach, from Bayside Drive Beach to Carnation Cove, after about 500 gallons of sewage spilled into the water, according to the agency. In order for it to reopen, water had to have acceptably low bacterial levels for two consecutive days.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
A sewage spill closed a portion of the waters off Newport Bay Tuesday, according to authorities. Waters between Channel Place Park and 41st Street, or about 600 feet of beach area, were off limits to swimmers and divers, according to a Tuesday announcement from the Orange County Health Care Agency. The spill of about 200 gallons appeared to be from a private property and began sometime Monday, although the city was notified of the spill Tuesday afternoon. The city notified the Health Care Agency at about 3:45 p.m. Tuesday, according to OCHCA program manager Larry Honeybourne.
NEWS
January 30, 2013
North Star Beach in the Back Bay reopened Wednesday morning after a sewage spill closed the area earlier this week, officials said. At 11:15 a.m. officials with the Orange County Health Care Agency received information showing the contamination cleared, according to Larry Honeybourne of the OCHCA. Sewage clears out of an area or dilutes when bacteria and organisms, accustom to living inside an animal's intestines, are exposed to sunlight, temperature changes, natural die off and predation by other microorganisms, Honeybourne said.
NEWS
January 28, 2013
A sewage spill closed the North Star Beach in Newport Bay on Monday, according to county health officials. Officials said a line blocked by rags in the Newport Beach sewage collection system caused 1,000 gallons of raw sewage to spill into the Newport Bay area. One possible cause was people flushing cloth rags or non-biodegradable material that could cause a blockage, said Larry Honeybourne of the Orange County Health Care Agency. The city notified health authorities of the spill about 9:45 a.m. Monday, according to an OCHCA report.
OCNOW
By Amy Senk, Corona del Mar Today | August 16, 2012
The Orange County Ocean Water Protection Program agency announced Thursday morning that a sewage spill has closed a section Newport Beach bay water, according to Corona del Mar Today . “Until further notice, in Newport Beach, the bay water area at Bayside Drive from the Balboa Island bridge (Marine Avenue) to Harbor Patrol Beach and the East Bay Front of Balboa Island is closed to swimming and diving due to a sewage spill (approximately 2800 gallons),” according to the agency's  webpage . The announcement was posted at 7:45 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
A portion of the coast near the Balboa Pier remained closed Wednesday after a sewage spill the day before contaminated the waters off Newport Beach. The area 1,000 feet upcoast and 1,000 feet downcoast of the Balboa Pier are closed for swimming, diving or surfing until further notice, according to a Tuesday statement from the Orange County Health Care Agency. Up-to-date information on beach closures is available on the agency's website, http://www.ocbeachinfo.com , and its Twitter account, @ocbeachinfo.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|