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NEWS
April 8, 2005
Michael Miller Newport-Mesa Unified School District officials have voiced disapproval for a state law that requires all newly purchased school buses to come equipped with lap-shoulder belts this year. The senate bill, signed in 2001 by former Gov. Gray Davis, mandates lap-shoulder belts for all school buses purchased in California after July 1 this year. Starting on the same date last year, all new buses that carry 20 passengers or fewer had to feature the added constraints.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- Within the next few years, children in Newport-Mesa may be riding cleaner, safer school buses that run on compressed natural gas. Right now, the school district has 60 old buses that run on diesel fuel, which pollutes the air and environment around them. But they may trade 20 of those dinosaurs for cleaner, more efficient models. For years, the district's transportation department has been studying alternative methods of fueling its school buses and maintenance fleets in preparation for the day when the government would demand it. That day now looms on the horizon.
NEWS
June 25, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Starting July 1, some new school buses in California will have something none has ever had before -- seat belts. State legislation will require that all new school buses carrying fewer than 20 passengers have a three-point restraint system, or shoulder and lap belt, beginning July 1. The same will be true for all new school buses starting July 1, 2005. Buses currently on the road without belts will still be legal, but any new buses purchased or manufactured will need the restraints, according to the state vehicle code.
NEWS
September 9, 1999
Jessica Garrison NEWPORT-MESA -- Even before the school year officially begins this morning, some neighbors near the newly opened Eastbluff Elementary School are already rumbling about traffic congestion. Across town, parents at Davis Elementary School worry that their school, which has limited parking in the school lot and no parking on adjacent streets, is difficult to access. At Andersen Elementary School last spring, parents voiced concerns about the increasingly crowded parking lot around that school.
NEWS
September 24, 2002
Walking as a means of transportation seems to be a thing of the past. I grew up in a family of walkers. My father walked to work. My mother walked to the store or to church. I walked to school. When I lived on the Balboa Peninsula, I walked from there to the 14th Street Grammar School in Newport. Jimmie Van Trees, Albert Spencer and I walked that two miles every day, rain or shine. On the way home, we walked along the beach and picked up soft shell sand crabs, which we sold for 10 cents a strawberry box to the fishermen on the Balboa Pier.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Marisa O'Neil School buses, crosswalks and sidewalks will be filled with students next week, and police want drivers to stay alert. Newport Coast Elementary School has a new access road and traffic pattern to ease some of the snarls faced by the new school. But officers from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa police departments will be looking out for traffic trouble in school zones throughout Newport-Mesa Unified School District. "We really want people to watch out for kids who are out and about, riding bikes and in crosswalks," Newport Beach Police Sgt. Steve Shulman said.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
"He was a profound thinker, a renowned theologian and an exceptional leader. He captivated the world." The Rev. Monsignor Lawrence Baird, spokesman for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange and administrator for St. John Vianney Chapel and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Newport Beach, on the death of Pope John Paul II. "If we were Americans, they would send people to train us, to get some skills. Mostly we are Latinos. I guess that's the problem."
NEWS
April 21, 2001
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- In a financially devastating blow to school districts, air pollution watchdogs Friday passed a rule requiring all new school buses and a percentage of old school buses to use specific alternative fuels. In a unanimous vote, the South Coast Air Quality Management District adopted the controversial measure that requires public and private school bus fleets with 15 or more buses to buy new, certified, alternative-fuel school buses.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- Newport-Mesa Unified School District officials are among a host of angry voices protesting a proposed rule, up for consideration today, that would require all new school buses to use specific kinds of alternative fuel. The South Coast Air Quality Management District, which is the regional government agency responsible for air pollution control in Orange and surrounding counties, will vote today on the rule. If passed, the rule would require that 15% of all large fleets owned by school districts and businesses be replaced by Jan. 1, 2003, said Mike Fine, the district's assistant superintendent of business services.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | May 19, 2012
How far should we go to save public education? So far as to name a school gym after a corporate sponsor? Let business interests influence textbook content? Put cigarette and junk food ads on the sides of school buses? If you think these ideas sound far-fetched, think again. As school budgets continue to be squeezed, districts are increasingly tempted to allow an insidious march of corporate marketers onto campus. Bearing gifts of needed school supplies, enrichment programs and outright cash, these businesses come in do-gooder guise, but that pretense does little to camouflage their aims of manipulating the buying decisions of kids and their parents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Leigh Steinberg | November 24, 2012
For some of us, middle school and high school were times for creating wonderful memories of friendship, unique events and learning. For victims of bullying, the school experience can be a daily terror — mental and emotional abuse, the crushing of self-esteem, and even physical violence. These students may carry the harrowing images and feelings with them for a lifetime, never fully recovering. School administrators, teachers, police and even parents too often ignore the ramifications of this daily harassment by peers until it is too late.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | May 19, 2012
How far should we go to save public education? So far as to name a school gym after a corporate sponsor? Let business interests influence textbook content? Put cigarette and junk food ads on the sides of school buses? If you think these ideas sound far-fetched, think again. As school budgets continue to be squeezed, districts are increasingly tempted to allow an insidious march of corporate marketers onto campus. Bearing gifts of needed school supplies, enrichment programs and outright cash, these businesses come in do-gooder guise, but that pretense does little to camouflage their aims of manipulating the buying decisions of kids and their parents.
FEATURES
By ROBERT GARDNER | September 1, 2006
Walking as a means of transportation seems to be a thing of the past. I grew up in a family of walkers. My father walked to work. My mother walked to the store or to church. I walked to school. When I lived on the Balboa Peninsula, I walked from there to the 14th Street Grammar School in Newport. Jimmie Van Trees, Albert Spencer and I walked that two miles every day, rain or shine. On the way home, we walked along the beach and picked up soft shell sand crabs, which we sold for 10 cents a strawberry box to the fishermen on the Balboa Pier.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
"He was a profound thinker, a renowned theologian and an exceptional leader. He captivated the world." The Rev. Monsignor Lawrence Baird, spokesman for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange and administrator for St. John Vianney Chapel and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Newport Beach, on the death of Pope John Paul II. "If we were Americans, they would send people to train us, to get some skills. Mostly we are Latinos. I guess that's the problem."
NEWS
April 8, 2005
Michael Miller Newport-Mesa Unified School District officials have voiced disapproval for a state law that requires all newly purchased school buses to come equipped with lap-shoulder belts this year. The senate bill, signed in 2001 by former Gov. Gray Davis, mandates lap-shoulder belts for all school buses purchased in California after July 1 this year. Starting on the same date last year, all new buses that carry 20 passengers or fewer had to feature the added constraints.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Marisa O'Neil School buses, crosswalks and sidewalks will be filled with students next week, and police want drivers to stay alert. Newport Coast Elementary School has a new access road and traffic pattern to ease some of the snarls faced by the new school. But officers from Newport Beach and Costa Mesa police departments will be looking out for traffic trouble in school zones throughout Newport-Mesa Unified School District. "We really want people to watch out for kids who are out and about, riding bikes and in crosswalks," Newport Beach Police Sgt. Steve Shulman said.
NEWS
June 25, 2004
Marisa O'Neil Starting July 1, some new school buses in California will have something none has ever had before -- seat belts. State legislation will require that all new school buses carrying fewer than 20 passengers have a three-point restraint system, or shoulder and lap belt, beginning July 1. The same will be true for all new school buses starting July 1, 2005. Buses currently on the road without belts will still be legal, but any new buses purchased or manufactured will need the restraints, according to the state vehicle code.
NEWS
June 22, 2004
Marisa O'Neil The debate about a loop road proposed to ease traffic problems at Newport Coast Elementary School continued Monday, the eve before City Council members will make a decision on its future. At the meeting organized by city officials, parents and homeowners in the area voiced their concerns for safety, traffic, pollution and property values around the school, where they said chaos ensues at pick-up and drop-off times. City council members will tonight vote whether to accept a bid that would allow work to start on the road next month and finish by Labor Day. The item was continued from the June 8 council meeting to give residents and city officials more time to explore other options.
NEWS
November 9, 2001
Deirdre Newman Harbor View Elementary School fifth-graders received a personal lesson in the high cost of freedom and the courage needed to defend it when they visited the Orange County Walk of Honor on Thursday. The Walk, at the Santa Ana Civic Center, honors the eight Orange County heroes who have earned the highest military award -- the Congressional Medal of Honor. Fifteen Orange County schools attended the event, with the Corona del Mar school the lone Newport-Mesa Unified School District representative.
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