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NEWS
February 27, 2004
Alicia Robinson County workers were given the go-ahead to continue dredging and clearing vegetation in San Diego Creek, but they can't start the work until after the rainstorms expected today. The Orange County Public Facilities and Resources Department received emergency permits from the Army Corps of Engineers and California Coastal Commission this week to continue clearing the creek, said county Public Works Director Kenneth R. Smith. "The irony is that we cannot get in and remove any of this prior to the storms coming up ... in the next two days, so as soon as we are able to get in after the storms we will recommence work," Smith said Wednesday.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Alicia Robinson A county project to dredge sediment and clear vegetation from San Diego Creek will be cut short when permits expire at midnight tonight. Work, which is mostly finished, will be halted today because of a requirement that work be stopped if endangered birds are sighted in the area. The estimated $3.3-million, 2.5-mile creek clearing project began in December. Orange County supervisors declared an emergency after county officials told them the overgrown creek could flood into the Irvine Ranch Water District's Michelson Water Reclamation Plant and send raw sewage into the Upper Newport Bay. "The work is effectively done, or we have completed as much as we can, mainly because of bird sightings," said county Public Works Director Herb Nakasone.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
Noaki Schwartz IRVINE -- The public meeting on the environmental health of Upper Newport Bay and San Diego Creek held on Tuesday was said to be interesting -- by those who were actually able to find the Irvine Ranch Water District and slip a question into the agenda. "It's a very difficult place to find. I would say my issues are that the meeting wasn't long enough to cover the issue," said Bob Caustin, president of Defend the Bay, adding that the two-hour time frame was unrealistic for the roughly 60 members of the public who wanted to speak.
NEWS
November 3, 2002
Cox secures funding for Newport Beach projects Rep. Chris Cox, who will seek reelection on Tuesday, announced Friday that 12 separate environmental initiatives that he created will clean Orange County beaches and waterways in 2003. Among Cox's initiatives that will be funded in 2003 to help Newport-Mesa are $3 million for Lower Back Bay; $972,000 for Upper Back Bay rehabilitation; $1 million to help build a cover for Big Canyon Reservoir; and about $1 million toward two San Diego Creek watershed projects.
NEWS
June 4, 2001
The Irvine Ranch Water District has decided to help fund a watershed study of San Diego Creek and Back Bay. The district's board unanimously approved an $80,000 payment for the study at a meeting last week. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is overseeing the $2.4-million project. The district is one of a handful of local agencies that will chip in 50% of the project's cost. Other parties include Costa Mesa, Newport Beach, Irvine, Santa Ana, Tustin, Lake Forest, the county of Orange and the Irvine Co. Each will pay $80,000, said Larry Paul, the county's manager of watershed and environmental programs.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
Paul Clinton UPPER NEWPORT BAY -- In response to a request from the Irvine Ranch Water District, Assemblyman John Campbell (R-Irvine) is preparing a bill that would transfer control of the flow of urban runoff into San Diego Creek and Upper Newport Bay to the water district. Still in its infancy, the bill is expected to be ready by the end of the month. "I'm hopeful that this puts one responsible entity in control of making sure that the water flowing into San Diego Creek is as clean as modern technology can make it," Campbell said Monday.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
Andrew Edwards A study on the condition of local waters showed streams around Newport Beach had high levels of phosphates and bacteria and had other problems, according to the conclusions of an Orange County Coastkeeper report released Thursday. The likely source of the pollution? Coastkeeper project manager Ray Hiemstra blamed urban runoff that he believes often comes from households. "This is just your classic over-watering, car-washing," Hiemstra said.
NEWS
April 1, 2001
When it comes to Irvine Ranch Water District [IRWD] officials, we've taken our fair share of potshots. The shots came especially fast and furious about five years ago, when we learned that IRWD leaders had plans to pump millions of gallons of treated sewage water into the Back Bay. Their pitch then was that the water would be used to refresh the duck pond marshes on the edge of the bay. But Newport Beach city leaders...
NEWS
April 28, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT HARBOR -- They're just hoping to make a dent in the trash. An army of concerned residents will fan out across Newport Harbor today as participants in the 21st annual Clean Harbor Day. Those who have volunteered for the event, numbering more than 200, said they hope to clean up some of the Styrofoam cups, tennis balls, plastic bags and other garbage that has washed down San Diego Creek into ...
NEWS
April 11, 2003
Paul Clinton Work to cleanup the Back Bay is now in line for federal funding after efforts by Rep. Chris Cox and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the agency said Thursday. Cox and Feinstein separately introduced bills that would amend a federal law to authorize the secretary of the Interior to provide 25% of the funding for water filtering by the Irvine Ranch Water District along the San Diego Creek and the Upper Newport Bay. Together, the two bills could provide as much as $19 million for it and two other district projects in the county.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jillian Beck | August 6, 2012
It only took two days for a 700-pound sea lion to find his way back up the Back Bay and into San Diego Creek in Irvine. On Saturday afternoon, police and a rescue team from the Laguna Beach-based Pacific Marine Mammal Center captured the adult sea lion in the creek near Main Street and released him into Newport Harbor later that day, said Lt. Julia Engen, a public information officer for the Irvine Police Department. Two days later, the sea lion was back, swimming up Newport's waterway.
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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | April 10, 2012
Corona del Mar may have topped the list of places where radioactive material linked to Fukushima, Japan, was found in kelp, but beachgoers were out in full force Tuesday afternoon, and some seemed unfazed by the findings. The beach activity comes on the heels of a study by Cal State Long Beach professors in which radioactive isotope iodine 131, one of the contaminants released by a Japanese nuclear power plant damaged by last year's earthquake and tsunami, was found in kelp sampled from Laguna Beach to Alaska.
NEWS
January 2, 2010
The high levels of selenium found in the Upper Newport Bay watershed are troubling indeed. State water quality officials earlier this month ordered Orange County, Newport Beach and several other cities, public agencies and private entities whose lands lie upstream from the estuary to pay perhaps hundreds of millions to fix the problem. This natural chemical is an essential nutrient for living species and organisms. But large concentrations can be poisonous to birds, mammals and humans, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center.
NEWS
By Roger Mallett | January 17, 2008
If you regularly drive along Jamboree Road from the 73 Freeway to the coast you will have noticed some dramatic changes at the uppermost end of the Back Bay. Sediment washed down San Diego Creek has transformed areas of open water into mudflat. The channels around the two islands that are protected nesting areas for the endangered California least tern are filled in, making the birds and their eggs vulnerable to feral cats. Sediment carried down the bay and out to the ocean has affected other habitats and species within the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve, created navigation problems in the Lower Newport Bay, and has affected the Marine Refuges along the Newport Coast.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
Welcome to Newport Beach ("Newport to spend $5M in fees on city parks," July 26). Give us lots of money and have at it! So the Great Park people are going to build in Newport Coast. Then I demand the same coastal drainage plan the Irvine Co.'s five-star Pelican Hills Resort is building, but at the same high level. Lennar, the nation's biggest developer and owner of the El Toro Marine Base property (Great Park), needs to know loud and clear, "not one drop of water from your project into Crystal Cove or Corona del Mar, period."
NEWS
By: | August 13, 2005
1. The Irvine Co. announced this week that it is taking over the management of which Newport-Mesa hotel? A. The Four Seasons B. The Ali Baba C. The Marriott D. Motel 3 2. The Newport-Mesa Unified School District is going to put a bond on the November ballot seeking how much money? A. $110 million B. $163 million C. $200 million D. $282 million 3. A sea lion named what was returned to the ocean this week after it likely swam north in the San Diego Creek?
NEWS
July 8, 2005
Andrew Edwards A study on the condition of local waters showed streams around Newport Beach had high levels of phosphates and bacteria and had other problems, according to the conclusions of an Orange County Coastkeeper report released Thursday. The likely source of the pollution? Coastkeeper project manager Ray Hiemstra blamed urban runoff that he believes often comes from households. "This is just your classic over-watering, car-washing," Hiemstra said.
NEWS
January 13, 2005
Chris Cox A recent letter to the editor -- and a column by Daily Pilot Managing Editor S.J. Cahn ("A little lesson in big-time politics," Thursday) -- took me to task for meeting with Muslim constituents in my Newport Beach office, because the subject of the meeting concerned someone from outside my district who lived in Anaheim. It is true there were also Orange Countians from outside my district in the meeting. But to suggest that this means that I am excessively focused on "national issues" because of my powerful position in Congress seems a bit silly.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
June Casagrande The words "welcome to Newport Beach" were still reverberating in the air when a controversy broke, stifling the city's welcome to its new neighbors in Santa Ana Heights. Hip-deep in the horse manure battle, in which equestrians and city officials squared off over water quality issues, the exciting news was muffled: Newport Beach is now home to horses. Scoopable news aside, the addition of Santa Ana Heights to the city's borders brings a proud tradition of a long-loved lifestyle.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Alicia Robinson A county project to dredge sediment and clear vegetation from San Diego Creek will be cut short when permits expire at midnight tonight. Work, which is mostly finished, will be halted today because of a requirement that work be stopped if endangered birds are sighted in the area. The estimated $3.3-million, 2.5-mile creek clearing project began in December. Orange County supervisors declared an emergency after county officials told them the overgrown creek could flood into the Irvine Ranch Water District's Michelson Water Reclamation Plant and send raw sewage into the Upper Newport Bay. "The work is effectively done, or we have completed as much as we can, mainly because of bird sightings," said county Public Works Director Herb Nakasone.
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