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NEWS
June 14, 2011
Orange Coast College is offering the community the chance to prepare themselves for retirement. OCC is hosting two, two-day retirement planning workshops starting Saturday morning on campus. The seminars are $59 a session and come with a 226-page illustrated textbook. The first session is 9 a.m. to noon Saturday and Sunday and the second is 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. June 21 and June 28. Parking is free for the weekend classes, but weekday students must park in metered spots.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | April 30, 2012
I've been retired for four years. On the whole, I like retirement a lot. It has its downsides, however, like not being able to remember what day it is. Recently my wife, Hedy, and I were having dinner at a Newport Beach restaurant after taking in "The Hunger Games" at the Regency Lido Theater. Hedy, a former schoolteacher, has been retired for 3½ years. We had a particularly good server that night. When she stopped by our table to collect her gratuity, Hedy said, "Thank you so much, and have a wonderful weekend.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Irvine Valley College's Police Department warned Thursday that someone has been trying to defraud the school's employees by convincing them to invest in a sham retirement plan. A female suspect claiming to represent Schools First or an affiliated business has been trying to sell tax-deferred annuities to IVC employees, according to police. "This is a scam," police said in an email. "Neither the person, nor the business that the person claims to represent, is affiliated with Schools First, and is not an approved solicitor of the South Orange County Community College District.
NEWS
November 12, 2009
The Newport-Mesa Board of Education approved an early-retirement incentive budget of up to $150,000 at its Tuesday meeting to benefit those who give early notice of their retirement. The program is limited to employees considering retirement at the end of the current school year; it would give up to $1,200 for each full-time worker who gives retirement notice by Jan. 15. There will be a cap on the number of participants in the first-come, first-served program. The district also approved an agreement to provide confidential student data to the Orange County Department of Education in order to receive grant funds for Davis, Pomona and Whittier elementary schools.
NEWS
April 13, 2004
Public retirement is out of control. Private sector employees are working longer. Public employees are retiring earlier because of the retirement formula that gives them 2% of their salary at age 50 to 55, which used to be put off until age 60. That combined with cafeteria health plans, sick leave and vacation, excess cash-outs means most public employees, especially fire fighters and police officers, can retire at...
NEWS
January 26, 2000
Amy R. Spurgeon Finding a life after retirement at the Oasis Senior Citizens Center wasn't a challenge for 80-year-old Nathalie Goldstein -- it was a calling. The Corona del Mar resident hustles around the sprawling facility on Marguerite Avenue each day, racking up 1,440 unpaid hours per year. She runs the gift shop, keeps track of the growing membership roster and helps in the kitchen. "If you ask my husband, I am here more than I am at home," Goldstein said.
NEWS
May 21, 2005
Andrew Edwards Newport Beach Police Chief Bob McDonell is retiring July 1. But don't expect the longtime peace officer to hang up his badge. If the City Council approves a plan proposed by City Manager Homer Bludau, McDonnell's retirement would only be a formality. McDonell could continue to serve as police chief under a contract that would allow him keep working at his existing salary while drawing a pension from the state's retirement fund. Mayor Steve Bromberg anticipates the council will approve Bludau's proposal.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
Deepa Bharath Many memories are fresh in Doug Wilson's mind. The Costa Mesa fire captain, who retired on Saturday, said his 28-year career with the city flashes in his mind's eye as he hangs up his heavy boots and yellow suit. There was the toughest call he ever took -- in 1981, when an airplane crashed in the middle of Victoria Street, killing four people. "I was a fire engineer then," Wilson said. "It was a difficult call because the scene was pretty devastating, with body parts scattered everywhere."
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Mel Lindsey, owner of the Giant Step Learning Center in Costa Mesa, recently sold the school in an effort to slow down and officially retire. Lindsey, 78, retired from the Long Beach School District 19 years ago. He and his wife then bought the center, which at that time consisted of about five students, a sandbox and a couple toys. It has since become a preschool and kindergarten facility for children ages 2 through 6. There are now a slew of wheel toys, playhouses and a large outdoor play area, with tire swings and basketball hoops.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 12, 2009
The new contract that Costa Mesa’s City Council approved for its firefighters Tuesday night enhances retirement benefits in order to encourage 12 firefighters to retire early. Politicians, activists and observers have different opinions on whether it will save the city money in the long run, though. Here’s the city’s math: Allowing firefighters to retire at age 50 instead of 55 will cost the city an extra $700,000 a year. The city will save $660,000 per year because the firefighters have agreed to forgo a scheduled pay raise of 4.9%.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014
After 10 years at Victoria Elementary School in Costa Mesa, Principal Linda Tenno has announced that she will retire at the end of this school year. Tenno, who also served as a teacher with the district, announced her retirement in a letter to the school community Friday, according to a Newport-Mesa Unified news release. "I treasure my years with the Victoria students, parents and staff, and know my time in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District and at Victoria has truly been the highlight of my 38-year career in education," she wrote.
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NEWS
By Tim Sesler | March 17, 2014
Have you heard of Costa Mesa's scandal de jour? Since 2012, 26 of our police officers have left. Most have simply retired. News flash: A retirement providing an officer 90% of his highest annual salary at age 50 will encourage early retirement. It's not rocket science. Yet, part of Costa Mesa's perpetually outraged electorate blames their favorite boogeyman, the mayor, James Righeimer, for this simple law of economics. An objective person looking for the cause could blame Gov. Jerry Brown for signing legislation more than 30 years ago that permitted our public officials to unionize, or CalPERS for misrepresenting that retroactively raising our officers' pensions by 50% wouldn't require increased city contributions, or naïve and ill-informed (pre-COIN, the Civic Openness in Negotiations ordinance)
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 13, 2014
After moves that folded many of her duties into other departments, Orange County's public guardian and assistant public administrator, Lucille Lyon, will retire after almost three years in that post, a news release said. "We're very thankful for Lucille's willingness to help Orange County during a troubled time, and we wish her all the best in retirement," Orange County Board of Supervisors Chairman Shawn Nelson said in a statement. Lyon - who managed estates of residents who died without heirs in her role as assistant public administrator and oversaw the county's conservatorship program as public guardian - joined Orange County in July 2011 as a scandal involving the previous public administrator and public guardian, John Williams, neared its conclusion.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 4, 2014
Orange County supervisors cleared the way Tuesday to hire 15 retired sheriff's deputies to speed up the processing of more than 1,000 concealed weapon applications that have poured in since a federal appellate court ruling relaxed gun restrictions. Orange County has received so many applications since the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that sheriff's officials said it would take a full year to process all the paperwork unless additional employees were brought in. Sheriff  Sandra Hutchens  told supervisors Tuesday that she believed the hundreds of applications for carrying a concealed weapon were just an “initial rush” and predicted the trend would taper off. Supervisor Todd Spitzer, who has pushed to expedite the processing of the applications, said he was pleased that Hutchens was bringing aboard temporary help to clear out the paper.
NEWS
By Jullian Fredericks, Special to the Daily Pilot | February 28, 2014
After 37 years of service at the grocery check stand, Linda Coughlin started celebrating her long-anticipated retirement Friday. Early-bird shoppers will surely be disappointed big time when they learn that she won't be there to greet them anymore. Linda has been a dedicated employee of the Pavilions on Bayside Drive in Newport Beach. Diligently commuting from her home in San Clemente, rain or shine, she has arrived bright and early to open the store, and always with a cheerful smile.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 5, 2014
It was almost 11 p.m. Tuesday, nearly five hours after the start of the Costa Mesa City Council meeting, when the discussion turned to a touchy subject: pension obligations. That's when the "big boogeyman" of a number, as the city's Pension Oversight Committee Chairman Jeff Arthur called it, was announced: $228 million in unfunded pension liabilities. It's the most current estimated shortfall between what City Hall will owe its retiring employees and what funds are available to pay that contractual obligation, according to Arthur.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 22, 2014
An associate city engineer will lead Costa Mesa's municipal employee union. Patrick Bauer was recently named president of the Costa Mesa City Employees Assn. He has served on its board of directors for seven of the eight years he has worked for the city. Bauer began his city career in 2005 after working in the private sector, according to a post on CostaMesaWorks.com, a CMCEA website. Bauer replaces Helen Nenadal, a 32-year city employee who retired in December . Nenadal, a facilities maintenance technician, served as CMCEA president for four years.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 15, 2014
David Brooks, a longtime Newport-Mesa Unified School District trustee, announced Tuesday that he plans to step down, citing time constraints and frequent travel with a charitable organization. Brooks, a retired Costa Mesa police captain, has represented the Estancia High School zone since April 1998. His term officially ends in 2016, but his last day will be March 11. He is involved in Voice of China and Asia, a missionary society, which requires lengthy travel. This other obligation made continuing to serve on the school board difficult, Brooks said.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 27, 2013
Ralph Whitford, who taught the "beach kids" at Newport Elementary School from the 1963 to 1993, has died. He was 84. The Costa Mesa resident succumbed to natural causes Dec. 10 at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, a family member said. "He just wanted to teach kids," said son Billy Whitford. "They all found him to be the very, very tough teacher at the time. But when they completed their school, then they all looked back and thought he was one of the best teachers they had. " The elder Whitford spent most of his educational career at Newport Elementary teaching fifth and sixth grades.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 4, 2013
Supervisor John Moorlach, who gained political recognition in 1994 when he raised concerns about the vulnerability of Orange County's investment pool during his campaign for county treasurer, announced Wednesday that he plans to run for Congress. The county declared bankruptcy in December of that year. The former county treasurer-tax collector said he will seek the 45th Congressional District seat being vacated next year by U.S. Rep. John Campbell (R-Irvine), who plans to retire.
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