Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsResearch
IN THE NEWS

Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | September 20, 2013
More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, including 75,000 in Orange County. By mid-century, those numbers could nearly triple, according to current projections. That's a frightening prospect. Most of us know someone who has suffered from this cruel, heart-wrenching disease, and have witnessed firsthand how it robs its victims of their memories and reasoning capacity, erasing the very essence of self as brains literally waste away. But the scary projections are also motivating some medical researchers to work furiously to find ways to stop the disease, or at least delay its progress.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 2, 2007
UC Irvine has received $14.5 million to do research on biological systems, joining eight other institutions in a nationwide project funded by the National Institutes of Health. In the study, a multidisciplinary team of 20 scientists will study the human body and other organisms to determine how different biological systems function together. The planned topics include birth defects, side effects of drugs and the ways bodies produce cells to repair wounds. Arthur Lander, the chair of UCI's Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, will spearhead the project, which is the only one of its kind to be held in California.
NEWS
May 5, 2003
Paul Clinton Local brokers and investors reacted coolly last week to the watershed corporate fraud settlement reached between federal regulators and Wall Street's top firms. Many said the $1.4-billion settlement that requires millions in fines and restitution would probably not usher in much change in the way Wall Street works. The settlement, announced early last week following months of intense negotiations between regulators and firms, is meant to restore the shattered trust of investors who bought stocks on the glowing advice of research reports that ultimately proved fraudulent.
NEWS
January 9, 2005
Leslie Bruce UC Irvine mathematics professor Svetlana Jitomirskaya received the 2005 American Mathematical Society Ruth Lyttle Satter Award on Thursday for her contribution to mathematics research. Jitomirskaya, a professor at UC Irvine for the past 14 years, received the Satter Award and $5,000 at an American Mathematical Society ceremony in Providence, R.I. Jitomirskaya was recognized for her research of disorderly models and elements to try to find patterns of order.
NEWS
January 27, 2009
Two professors will discuss “Race and Equality in America” as part of UCI’s 10th annual Chancellor’s Distinguished Fellows Series. New York University sociology professor Troy Duster, who studies the role of ethnicity in biomedical research, will join University of Notre Dame professor Dianne Pinderhughes, who researches racial and ethnic politics and public policy, in a lecture Thursday. The lecture series brings top intellectuals in the sciences and humanities to UCI for public talks.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | October 24, 2008
Bypassing federal restrictions, stem cell research is coming to campus at UCI. University officials and scientists cheered Friday morning as officials and top donors broke ground on the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, a nearly $67-million building that will give four stories and more than 100,000 square feet to researching the fast-growing field. The new building will include not only the core stem cell laboratory and equipment, but also clinical space for work with patients, as well as a course on stem cell techniques and a master’s degree program in biotechnology with an emphasis in stem cell research.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | July 19, 2012
A former assistant professor at UC Irvine is suing the university, saying she faced retaliation when she flagged data that she claims was falsified by researchers trying to prove a faulty hypothesis, according to her Orange County Superior Court lawsuit. Dr. Christina Schwindt, 47, of Newport Beach says she faced retaliation, harassment and gender discrimination while working as a physician and researcher in the UCI School of Medicine. She claims in her legal filing to have exposed "scientific misconduct.
NEWS
September 1, 2009
Who said you can’t treat your college education like a game? UC Irvine’s school of information and computer science is aiming to do just that, with the establishment of the Center for Computer Games and Virtual Worlds, school officials announced Tuesday. The center, with the help of more than 20 faculty members, will aim to expand campus-wide research on the various social and technological qualities of games and virtual worlds. UCI was among the first universities to establish educational and research programs on game culture and technology.
NEWS
November 20, 2001
A fire that blazed through two chemistry labs at UC Irvine in July resulted in as much as $3.5 million in damage, officials said. The fire, on July 23 in Frederick Reines Hall, will cost $1 million in damage, including cleanup costs, $1 million toreplace laboratory and research equipment and an estimated $1.2 million to $1.5 million to rebuild the two labs, which will be ready for use by next spring. Reines Hall is one of the two major research buildings in the School of Physical Sciences, housing laboratories, offices and research facilities for the chemistry, physics and astronomy departments.
NEWS
April 17, 2008
UCI has created a new Environmental Institute to develop solutions concerning global change, officials announced Thursday. The institute will focus on conducting research on climate change and its effects, green solutions, and new energy technologies. Scientists from various backgrounds and departments across campus will work on these projects. The institute will award grants on a competitive basis to UCI research teams who are geared toward research, innovation and societal response.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | April 11, 2014
The 2014 Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF) Dream Gala was billed as "Let's Misbehave," and they certainly did. More than 500 Orange County citizens dressed to impress in Roaring Twenties period costume and danced a wild Charleston to help raise crucial funds for diabetes research, in particular a cure for Type I diabetes. Organizers created a speakeasy theme, complete with antique claw-footed bathtubs filled with gin on ice. Disneyland's popular announcer, Bill Rogers , emceed the evening, which was dedicated to O.C. citizens Janet and Carl Nolet, Jr. and Lara and Tom Giddings . Co-chaired by Julie Hellmers , Eric Seedman and John Stoner , with assistance from honorary chair John Giovannone , the March 29 party at the St. Regis Monarch Beach Resort was made possible by serious donors, including Newport's Mary and Dick Allen , Toni and Steve Berlinger , Ellen Darling and Alex Conti , Jackie and Norm Kallan , and Nancy and Larry Silverberg , to name only a few. Important corporate sponsors included ABP Capital, Black, Starr & Frost, Golden State Foods, Stoner Fox Law and Greenberg Traurig, again to name only a few. The fundraising effort included tremendous underwriting support combined with auction proceeds sold by auctioneer Jeff Stokes (including a Harry Winston ladies' watch valued at $40,000)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2014
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | March 31, 2014
April is national Parkinson's Awareness Month. I know a bit about Parkinson's disease; we've lived together for 17 years. My father had it for nine years. I received my own diagnosis eight years ago, just before he died. I have an uncle who's exhibiting early symptoms. Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder with no known cure. It causes nerve cells to die or become impaired, and patients exhibit such symptoms as tremors or shaking, slowness of movement, rigidity or stiffness, loss of facial mobility, and balance difficulties.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
A postdoctoral researcher based at UC Irvine received a $1,000 grant to study youth library services. The Young Adult Library Services Assn. award will allow Crystle Martin to research how youth library services and connected learning, an educational approach that integrates the demands of the digital age, aim to make learning accessible for all children, according to a news release. "Libraries are ideal hubs to facilitate connecting youth, allowing them to succeed in school and in their career trajectory," Martin, who is part of at the University of California Humanities Research Institute, said in the release.
NEWS
By Jim de Boom | December 30, 2013
As I get older, the more sentimental I get. Sing the national anthem at an Angels game, and I will have tears in my eyes. Marching bands, whether high school, college or the Salvation Army band, bring tears to my eyes. And so did the 2014 Rotary Rose Parade Float titled "Engage Rotary/Change Lives," which showcased Rotary's commitment to eradicating polio worldwide. Two of the riders on Rotary's float represented the giants in defeating this disease: Peter L. Salk, the oldest son of Jonas Salk, who, together with his team at the University of Pittsburgh, developed the first successful polio vaccine.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
The National Institute on Aging awarded researchers at UC Irvine a two-year, $600,000 grant to develop and study patient-derived stem cell lines. The UCI Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, or MIND, will create up to 40 sets of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are found in adult skin and blood samples, to explore the biology of Alzheimer's disease and test therapeutic approaches, according to a news release. The iPS cells can be scientifically changed into stem cells to repair ailments like memory loss.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 5, 2013
The Fairview Park Citizens Advisory Committee on Wednesday approved three suggestions for additions to the park, based on ideas the group generated earlier this year. A majority of the nine-member committee favored adding a community garden, information kiosks with pamphlets, and a nature center with bird-watching platforms within the 208-acre park's northwest quadrant. The three suggestions will be brought to city staff, who will research the feasibility of each before the committee's next meeting, scheduled for February.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall | October 23, 2013
Hoag Hospital will partner with USC's Keck School of Medicine to enhance cancer treatment provided at the hospital. The affiliation, announced Monday, comes as part of an effort to provide improved local care for cancer patients, according to a news release. Dr. Burton Eisenberg will be executive medical director of the Hoag Family Cancer Institute, which provides cancer care on the campus. The former Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center deputy director will also be a full-time USC faculty member.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 22, 2013
Greg Duncan, a scholar in the field of early childhood education at UC Irvine and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, was awarded the Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize for his work on the effects of poverty on child development. In addition to the award, Duncan was also given 1 million Swiss francs, or $1.09 million, by the Jacobs Foundation, which has been honoring exceptional achievements in the field of child and youth development annually since 2009, according to a news release.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | September 20, 2013
More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, including 75,000 in Orange County. By mid-century, those numbers could nearly triple, according to current projections. That's a frightening prospect. Most of us know someone who has suffered from this cruel, heart-wrenching disease, and have witnessed firsthand how it robs its victims of their memories and reasoning capacity, erasing the very essence of self as brains literally waste away. But the scary projections are also motivating some medical researchers to work furiously to find ways to stop the disease, or at least delay its progress.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|