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Red Ribbon Week

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NEWS
October 25, 1999
Amy R. Spurgeon NEWPORT-MESA -- As the school district's Red Ribbon Week begins today, one Newport Beach mother is hoping her son's story will stop other's from making the same mistakes he did. "I cope because I know he is free from this," Judy Davis said. "But I still cry every day." An honor student and award winning artist, Robert "Bobby" Davis was 21 when he was found dead, apparently of a heroin overdose, by his fiancee in the home they shared in Southern California.
NEWS
October 30, 1999
Danette Goulet NEWPORT BEACH -- Red Ribbon Week at Mariners Elementary School ended on an extremely high note Friday morning. As the finale to the weeklong anti-drug campaign celebrated by schools in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, the Mariners PTA brought Gale Webb's "Ride Hard -- Ride Safe" extreme sports show to campus. On in-line skates, skateboards and BMX bikes, daredevils gained momentum as they flung themselves up the ramps and into the air. For students, all were role models, the youngest of which is only 8 years old. One of the main messages of the show was "get high on life, not drugs."
NEWS
September 26, 2006
Here are some items the board will consider tonight: NEW SCIENCE PROGRAM The Irvine Co. has offered Newport-Mesa $2.5 million over the next 10 years to pay for science teachers at elementary campuses. The district expects to have state-of-the-art science classrooms built at all sites under the recently passed Measure F school bond, but the bond does not cover funds to hire or maintain faculty. With the annual $250,000, combined with district funds and interest from an Irvine Co. endowment, Newport-Mesa plans to hire four science teachers this year and expand the number to eight in subsequent years.
NEWS
November 1, 1999
We stopped by Newport Harbor High School last week to ask students what they thought about Red Ribbon Week. And if Red Ribbon Week doesn't work, what does? Here's what they had to say: "Red Ribbon Week doesn't work at all. It might help kids not to get started using drugs but it doesn't make them quit. Drugs are too addicting. Growing up and moving on to different things might work."--Danny Stone, 15, sophomore, Newport Beach "If your parents made your life tough, like taking away all of your privileges, that might make you quit using drugs and alcohol.
NEWS
October 28, 1999
Educating our youth about the dangers of controlled substances is the No. 1 goal this year in the national fight against drug and alcohol abuse. As part of Red Ribbon Week, it is our job to do the same at home. Like many districts across the country, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District unfortunately has to deal with drug and alcohol problems among its teenage students. School officials acknowledge that during many weekends throughout the year there are parties where underage students get access to alcohol and drugs.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM WHAT HAPPENED: Tina Reinemann, a kindergarten teacher at Killybrooke Elementary School in Costa Mesa, asked the school district to consider applying for a new state program created last month when Gov. Gray Davis signed the Kindergarten Readiness Pilot Program into law. WHAT IT MEANS: The district must sign up for the program by May 1. It would allow the district to move the kindergarten registration...
NEWS
October 31, 2004
Dane Grace Lessons from the surf became lessons in life, as youngsters at Newport Heights Elementary School were reminded Friday that drugs are not good for them. The students, adorned in red Hawaiian leis and sunglasses, participated in Red Ribbon Week, which was capped off at the school Friday with a visit from Surf Dads Against Drugs, who drove home the anti-drug message. Tyler Collin, 10, of Newport Beach, seemed to get the message. "It was cool," Collin said.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | October 24, 2013
From his wheelchair in the Corona del Mar High School gym, Aaron Rubin held up one finger to indicate "yes" and two fingers for "no" as he answered questions about a drug addiction that led him to a catastrophic overdose. "This is Aaron," said his mother, Sherrie Rubin. "Aaron overdosed on OxyContin and prescription meds when he was 23. He was in a coma for three and a half weeks. He had a heart attack and two strokes. " Aaron, now 31, can no longer speak, Sherrie explained, and only about one quarter of his brain was undamaged after the strokes.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | October 24, 2006
Sherri Fenn has some real issues with fast food. The Woodland Elementary School first-grade mother, a board member of the school's Parent Faculty Organization, did an experiment in which she purchased a McDonald's Happy Meal and left it out in her garage — seven months ago. Since then, she said, the burger and fries haven't visibly aged a day, and she's shown them to students to demonstrate the preservatives in fast food. Now, Fenn is taking her activism to a whole new level.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | October 24, 2013
From his wheelchair in the Corona del Mar High School gym, Aaron Rubin held up one finger to indicate "yes" and two fingers for "no" as he answered questions about a drug addiction that led him to a catastrophic overdose. "This is Aaron," said his mother, Sherrie Rubin. "Aaron overdosed on OxyContin and prescription meds when he was 23. He was in a coma for three and a half weeks. He had a heart attack and two strokes. " Aaron, now 31, can no longer speak, Sherrie explained, and only about one quarter of his brain was undamaged after the strokes.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes | November 19, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH - Thanksgiving is still about a week away, but on turkeys were everywhere at Ensign Intermediate School. The Newport Beach seventh- and eighth-grade school held its seventh annual Turkey Trot fundraiser Friday. "The Turkey Trot is going really well," Principal Gloria Duncan said. "Lots of students participated. Many parents are here, coming and going. It's really been a nice event to bring the parents and students together. " Students in physical education shorts and special Turkey Trot T-shirts - featuring a funky turkey printed on the front - stretched out on the blacktop before running a mile.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan, tom.ragan@latimes.com | October 28, 2010
COSTA MESA — Many of the 600 Costa Mesa Middle School students wore red shirts Thursday in recognition of Red Ribbon Week, an anti-drug movement born in the Just Say No 1980s. The annual demonstration fell days before voters will decide on Proposition 19, which would decriminalize the recreational use of marijuana for adults older than 21. "They can legalize it," said Nabeel Salamen, 12, a seventh-grader, "but it's going to be people's choice then to [make] their life worse.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | October 24, 2006
Sherri Fenn has some real issues with fast food. The Woodland Elementary School first-grade mother, a board member of the school's Parent Faculty Organization, did an experiment in which she purchased a McDonald's Happy Meal and left it out in her garage — seven months ago. Since then, she said, the burger and fries haven't visibly aged a day, and she's shown them to students to demonstrate the preservatives in fast food. Now, Fenn is taking her activism to a whole new level.
NEWS
September 26, 2006
Here are some items the board will consider tonight: NEW SCIENCE PROGRAM The Irvine Co. has offered Newport-Mesa $2.5 million over the next 10 years to pay for science teachers at elementary campuses. The district expects to have state-of-the-art science classrooms built at all sites under the recently passed Measure F school bond, but the bond does not cover funds to hire or maintain faculty. With the annual $250,000, combined with district funds and interest from an Irvine Co. endowment, Newport-Mesa plans to hire four science teachers this year and expand the number to eight in subsequent years.
NEWS
October 31, 2004
Dane Grace Lessons from the surf became lessons in life, as youngsters at Newport Heights Elementary School were reminded Friday that drugs are not good for them. The students, adorned in red Hawaiian leis and sunglasses, participated in Red Ribbon Week, which was capped off at the school Friday with a visit from Surf Dads Against Drugs, who drove home the anti-drug message. Tyler Collin, 10, of Newport Beach, seemed to get the message. "It was cool," Collin said.
NEWS
October 20, 2001
At the Newport-Mesa Unified School District board meeting of Oct. 9, 12 days after trustee Jim Ferryman was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol with a 0.19 blood alcohol level, he voted to support a resolution endorsing Red Ribbon Week, a substance abuse awareness program for kids that begins in two days. Ferryman should have abstained from the vote, but he once again used poor judgment, so now the program is tarnished. Ferryman then used a late evening tribute to Matt Colby, the local football player who recently passed away, to segue into a statement about his DUI. He issued a weak, perfunctory statement about his crime and his plans for the future.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM WHAT HAPPENED: Tina Reinemann, a kindergarten teacher at Killybrooke Elementary School in Costa Mesa, asked the school district to consider applying for a new state program created last month when Gov. Gray Davis signed the Kindergarten Readiness Pilot Program into law. WHAT IT MEANS: The district must sign up for the program by May 1. It would allow the district to move the kindergarten registration...
NEWS
November 1, 1999
We stopped by Newport Harbor High School last week to ask students what they thought about Red Ribbon Week. And if Red Ribbon Week doesn't work, what does? Here's what they had to say: "Red Ribbon Week doesn't work at all. It might help kids not to get started using drugs but it doesn't make them quit. Drugs are too addicting. Growing up and moving on to different things might work."--Danny Stone, 15, sophomore, Newport Beach "If your parents made your life tough, like taking away all of your privileges, that might make you quit using drugs and alcohol.
NEWS
October 30, 1999
Danette Goulet NEWPORT BEACH -- Red Ribbon Week at Mariners Elementary School ended on an extremely high note Friday morning. As the finale to the weeklong anti-drug campaign celebrated by schools in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, the Mariners PTA brought Gale Webb's "Ride Hard -- Ride Safe" extreme sports show to campus. On in-line skates, skateboards and BMX bikes, daredevils gained momentum as they flung themselves up the ramps and into the air. For students, all were role models, the youngest of which is only 8 years old. One of the main messages of the show was "get high on life, not drugs."
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