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Red Light Cameras

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NEWS
May 19, 2005
NEWS
By Keith Curry | October 12, 2012
One thing I have learned in politics is that you can never predict who will oppose an idea until it's proposed. Certainly this is the case with the provision in Measure EE that would ban the use of red-light cameras in Newport Beach. The opponents of Measure EE say we should reject this provision because "it may preclude technological advances beneficial to our city. " They are wrong, and here is why. Because I am active in the League of Cities, I get the opportunity to see how issues are addressed across California and throughout our nation.
NEWS
December 21, 2003
I believe that the cameras are the best idea, without having traffic officers at each intersection. It is obvious that many people, who feel like no one is watching, drive irresponsibly. With the real threat of being caught, people are more likely to follow the traffic laws. That makes the roadway a much safer place to be for everyone. DIANA LESTER Huntington Beach The good news is that the red-light cameras seem to be working, having caught 4,000 violators.
LOCAL
By By Lauren Vane | October 22, 2005
The controversial red-light cameras in Costa Mesa are now clear of any legal issues, city officials said. Cameras at two intersections -- Newport Boulevard at 17th Street and Newport Boulevard at 19th Street -- were suspended in February after one man successfully fought a citation, arguing that a light did not stay yellow long enough. The court ruled that the city could not issue tickets for traffic-signal violations at those two intersections, because they are operated by Caltrans.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
I don't like the new red-light cameras and here are some of the reasons why. At most signals, when a red-light runner is pulled over, the officer will talk to the driver and ask why they ran the red light. During that questioning the officer can determine if the officer is drunk has a medical problem and he can also run a check on the driver for warrants or to see if the car is stolen. None of this can be achieved by taking a photograph of the car. When an officer issues a ticket it's to the driver, who may not be the registered owner.
LOCAL
By By Lauren Vane | January 12, 2006
Intersections mostly on Harbor Boulevard will be in focus if council votes with police proposal.Costa Mesa police are recommending locations for seven new cameras to be installed, which would complete the final phase of placing 20 cameras to catch drivers who run red lights at Costa Mesa intersections. The Costa Mesa City Council considered the recommendation at a study session Tuesday. The proposal will come before the council at a later date. The city has had red-light cameras since June 2003.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
Marisa O'Neil Use of red-light cameras at three intersections will be temporarily suspended as a "precaution" following a court ruling, city officials said Friday. The decision came after a driver successfully appealed a ticket he received as he turned left from southbound Newport Boulevard onto 19th Street, City Manager Allan Roeder said. The driver had argued that the yellow light for the turn lane in that intersection was too short, Roeder said.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 28, 2009
Costa Mesa is reevaluating whether it should run red light cameras at several of the city’s bigger intersections. Since red light cameras first went up around town in 2003, the city has noticed an increase in accidents at intersections that are monitored with the cameras. However, while rear-end collisions are up 20%, broadside crashes, which often cause more severe injuries, are down 30%. Officials look at this as a positive result. But there are other pieces to the equation.
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NEWS
By Jill Cowan | November 7, 2012
Newport Beach residents approved 38 changes to their city charter on election day. About 18,862 voters (57%) were in favor of Measure EE, and 14,244 (43%) were opposed, according to final election results released Wednesday. "I'm encouraged citizens saw through misrepresentations of opponents to make the city more efficient and protect it from [class-action] lawsuits," Mayor Pro Tem Keith Curry said, taking a short break from mingling at the Orange County Republican Party's election night gathering at the Westin South Coast Plaza.
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NEWS
By Novell Hendrickson | October 29, 2012
Re. " Measure EE addresses lawsuits, red lights (Oct. 14): The above-referenced article starts out with, "Those are the highlights in an otherwise dry legal document that asks voters to make 38 changes to the 58- year-old city charter. " And then, it states, "Deciding the fate of 38 constitutional amendments sounds like a big deal. " Well, it is a big deal, for the City Council and staff to virtually rewrite our charter in five one-and-one-half hour charter update committee working meetings, in particular since extensive modifications were made to the charter just two years ago. About three-fourths of the article consisted of dialogue with the proponents discussing the issues without an opportunity for equal response from the opponents.
NEWS
By Keith Curry | October 12, 2012
One thing I have learned in politics is that you can never predict who will oppose an idea until it's proposed. Certainly this is the case with the provision in Measure EE that would ban the use of red-light cameras in Newport Beach. The opponents of Measure EE say we should reject this provision because "it may preclude technological advances beneficial to our city. " They are wrong, and here is why. Because I am active in the League of Cities, I get the opportunity to see how issues are addressed across California and throughout our nation.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | September 15, 2012
Critics challenged proposed Newport Beach city charter amendments at a community forum this week, drawing a rebuke from city officials. The Wednesday debate, hosted by Speak Up Newport, highlighted some of the most contentious proposals for the city constitution. The forum will be shown on Newport Beach Television (Time Warner Channel 3 and Cox Channels 30/852) at various times. For the schedule of dates and times, click here . Voters in November will be asked to vote on 38 changes - from conflict-of-interest to City Council compensation rules - all in one yes or no vote on Measure EE. Supporters say it would make mostly clerical changes and codify practices already in place, while opponents say it would weaken public protections and the amendments shouldn't all be rolled together.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | July 12, 2012
Newport Beach voters will have the option in November to ban red-light cameras from the city. The City Council voted Tuesday to include a red-light camera prohibition in the list of charter amendments that will come before the electorate this fall. The city has no red-light cameras now. Other cities have banned them amid complaints that they were merely a way to boost city revenue. The vote was the culmination of a months-long charter update process, where a committee sifted through about 40 sections of the city's constitution and recommended changes to the council.
NEWS
James P. Gray | June 13, 2010
I n many parts of the country, police have expressly been instructed to issue more traffic citations in order to generate revenue to counteract governmental budget deficits. For example, this has happened in the metropolitan Detroit area, where the state of Michigan reduced its revenue sharing with communities by $3 billion. More tickets have been issued there for driving as little as 5 mph above the speed limit, and traffic warnings have virtually become a thing of the past. The reason for this action was stated succinctly by the president of the Police Officers Assn.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | August 28, 2009
Costa Mesa is reevaluating whether it should run red light cameras at several of the city’s bigger intersections. Since red light cameras first went up around town in 2003, the city has noticed an increase in accidents at intersections that are monitored with the cameras. However, while rear-end collisions are up 20%, broadside crashes, which often cause more severe injuries, are down 30%. Officials look at this as a positive result. But there are other pieces to the equation.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | June 4, 2008
Costa Mesa has lost money in the first three years of having cameras monitor red-light runners, but the City Council voted Tuesday to install more at four new intersections because they feel the devices improve safety. In a 4-1 vote the council approved cameras for Harbor Boulevard and Gisler Avenue, Harbor Boulevard and Baker Street, Harbor Boulevard and South Coast Drive, and Victoria Street and Placentia Avenue. Mayor Pro Tem Allan Mansoor voted against the proposal, saying he prefers fewer cameras and that the city needs to consider other alternatives.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | June 3, 2008
Although statistics show that red light cameras in Costa Mesa have increased the number of accidents where they monitor traffic, they have decreased the number of injury-related collisions, leading city staff to recommend doubling the number of photo-enforced intersections in the city. City council members will vote tonight on whether to add red light cameras to four Costa Mesa intersections within the year. The cameras would be installed by Nestor Traffic Systems at Harbor Boulevard and Gisler Avenue, Harbor Boulevard and Baker Street, Harbor Boulevard and South Coast Drive, and Victoria Street and Placentia Avenue.
LOCAL
By Kelly Strodl | July 26, 2007
Tony Pecka is watering his front lawn, trying to talk about speeding drivers taking shortcuts through his neighborhood, but he's having trouble making himself heard over the roar of traffic. It's been like this for some time at the retired firefighter's home in the 300 block of Broadway Street on Costa Mesa's eastside. "A dramatic change occurred when they completed the freeway at 19th Street," Pecka said. "That wasn't the plan. It was supposed to go all the way to Coast Highway."
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