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NEWS
May 30, 2011
I read with interest the "Community Commentary" written by Carl Ossipoff in the Daily Pilot on May 3 ("Lack of recycling centers frustrating"). He bemoaned the lack of recycling centers but did fail to mention that Orange Coast College has an excellent recycling center. Per OCC's website, http://www.orangecoastcollege.edu/about_occ/facilities/recycling_center/: "The Orange Coast College Recycling Center will pay back current value of 5 cents per each container under 24 ounces and 10 cents per container 24 ounces or larger of liquid or ready-to-drink products in aluminum, glass, plastic, and bi-metal containers that have the California Redemption Value or CRV message on the label.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
Get ready for some trash talk just in time for Earth Day. Orange Coast College's Recycling Center Director Mike Carey is giving a lecture on "You Are What You Trash: the 3 R's of Recycling" at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the OCC Library Lecture Room, 2701 Fairview Road. Carey was the first recipient of the Award for Environmental Excellence from the Costa Mesa Sanitary District. The program is sponsored by the OCC Friends of the Library. A donation of $5 or a gently used book is requested.
NEWS
By Carl E. Ossipoff | May 2, 2011
I guess I'm an average consumer. I didn't mind recycling because the thought of all that material (glass, paper, aluminum cans and plastic) going into a landfill was an affront to me. Newport has a program whereby the residential waste is sent to a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) but since my household uses a trash compactor, I wondered if materials inside the compactor bag were also sorted. I called the city and left a message for the General Services/Waste office. What I wanted to know was what happens to all that glass when it gets crushed and broken in the trash trucks.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Nothing says Happy New Year like a dead fir tree lying by the trash cans with a few strands of silver tinsel clinging to its thinning bough. But now that your Christmas tree has served its purpose, don’t just kick it to the curb to be hauled away to the dump. Recycle it! The City of Newport Beach makes it easy for you with its annual curbside Christmas tree recycling program, which begins Wednesday and runs through Jan. 11. Real Christmas trees were in this year, because, some say, they’re more eco-conscious than fake ones.
NEWS
October 7, 2008
Got some old tires in the garage you want to get rid of? The Costa Mesa Sanitary District and Costa Mesa are teaming up for a used tire collection to recycle them. You can drop off the used tires from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the city’s corporation yard, which is across the street from Estancia High School, 2300 Placentia Ave. Unmounted and mounted tires will be accepted for no charge. Recyclers can use the material for playground coverings for local schools or for road paving.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Waldorf School of Orange County's eighth-grade class was honored Friday morning with the Environmental Excellence Award by the city of Costa Mesa for starting a schoolwide recycling program a year ago. The eighth-graders introduced green products to the community at school festivals, are working on creating mini-presentation on the importance of recycling for classrooms, and have applied to start a local chapter of Teens Turning Green, a national organization....
NEWS
April 28, 2000
Alex Coolman Costa Mesa and Newport Beach are doing a better job than most California municipalities at recycling their trash, city officials said. While many cities across California and 24 cities in Orange County are failing to prevent more than half of their waste from ending up in landfills, the most recent statistics show Costa Mesa diverting 54% of its garbage. Newport Beach, which diverted about 45% in 1998, expects that number to be as high as 52% for this year.
BUSINESS
By Dave Brooks | June 7, 2006
A local nonprofit group is zeroing in on local businesses in hopes of reducing waste to zero. The Costa Mesa-based Earth Resource Foundation is hosting its Zero Waste Conference at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim Thursday, bringing in entrepreneurs who have made it their business to follow the foundation's mantra on sustainability: refuse, reuse, reduce and recycle. That means refusing to use harmful products, reusing raw materials instead of throwing them away, reducing waste through the best practices and recycling when necessary.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 10, 2007
Newport Beach City Council members on Tuesday will make a second attempt to hire a trash hauler to serve Newport Coast for the next decade, following problems with the first contract award and anonymous mudslinging against the bidders. Going for a second round of bids apparently saved the city money, but it hasn't stilled all criticisms of waste disposal firms that want the 4,000-household Newport Coast contract. The council voted in May to give a $6.1 million trash and recycling contract to Ware Disposal, which submitted the lowest bid the first time.
NEWS
June 5, 2003
INSIDE CITY HALL Here are some of the items the council considered on Monday. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES This item was continued from the May 5 meeting. The combination of fiscal effects of the economy, the state's budget crisis and rising operating costs has created significant pressures on resources to balance the 2003-04 budget. While these pressures created a shortfall of about $10 million, the city manager and staff were able to whittle the deficit to about $4 million.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | February 25, 2014
Costa Mesa Sanitary District ratepayers' relatively luxurious one-trash-bin-holds-all system was nice while it lasted. The longtime program that permitted all types of refuse to go into a single bin - no sorting required - faced the end of its run Tuesday with the district directors' unanimous approval of an organics recycling program. The new system could begin as soon as November. The program, estimated to cost about $504,000 annually, will have residents separate their trash for organics, which include gardening clippings and food scraps.
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NEWS
January 31, 2014
The Costa Mesa Sanitary District is continuing its effort this month to inform the public about an organics recycling program that, for the first time, would require ratepayers to sort their trash. Two meetings in Costa Mesa are planned to inform people about the program before the district's board of directors considers approving it Feb. 25. The first meeting is at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 6 at Halecrest Park, 3107 Killybrooke Lane. The second is at 9 a.m. Feb. 8 at Back Bay/Monte Vista High School, 390 Monte Vista Drive.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | January 24, 2014
Costa Mesa Sanitary District directors unanimously agreed Thursday to delay a vote on an organics recycling program, saying that more time is needed to inform the public. The board will pick the topic up again Feb. 25. Before then the district plans to host additional community workshops - two were held within the past several weeks - to inform ratepayers about the proposed six-year contract with CR&R Environmental Services. The contract is estimated to cost $504,679 annually. Director Arlene Schafer said more workshops are needed to make sure ratepayers understand the proposal.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
A second workshop will be held Saturday morning to discuss a proposed organics recycling program for Costa Mesa residents. The meeting, hosted by the Costa Mesa Sanitary District, takes places at 9 a.m. in the Neighborhood Community Center, 1845 Park Ave. The estimated $504,679 program with CR&R Environmental Services is under environmental review and would have residents sorting their trash for organic material, , which could include food...
NEWS
By Robert J. Ooten | December 13, 2013
Re. "Commentary: Trash contract is not in the best interest of ratepayers," [Nov. 27]: Planning Commissioner Jim Fitzpatrick wrote of his concerns about the recyclable materials' value in a Daily Pilot opinion article. He noted the value of the recyclable materials that the trash vendor could salvage and sell was $3 million. The $3 million Fitzpatrick claimed that the trash vendor made from the salvaged recyclables is for all 13 customers served by the trash vendor, not just Costa Mesa.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | December 12, 2013
Two town hall meetings have been set to gather public input on a planned organics recycling program in Costa Mesa. Ratepayers with the Costa Mesa Sanitary District currently put all their trash - including green waste and recyclables - into a single bin, giving them the relative luxury of not having to sort their items. Under the proposed $504,679 program with CR&R Environmental Services, district ratepayers would have to sort out organics - including food scraps and gardening waste - and place them in a separate bin. The organics would be picked up the same a day as the trash and recyclables, but by a different truck.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 19, 2013
Costa Mesa Sanitary District on Thursday is expected to consider giving residents a little more work when it comes to emptying out the trash. Under a proposed contract with CR&R Environmental Services, residents would have to separate their organics - food scraps and plant material, such as grass clippings and leaves - into a 64-gallon bin that complements one for trash and recyclables. The district's current setup provides residences with two 60-gallon containers that handle all types of waste, giving residents the relative luxury of not having to separate their trash.
NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | April 23, 2013
A Southern California recycling and waste management company has pledged half a million dollars to Orange Coast College's recycling center. The money from Stanton-based CR&R Waste and Recycling Services, plus $1.5 million already pledged from the Associated Students, will fund an expansion to the center. The expansion, designed by the Costa Mesa-based architectural firm Dougherty & Dougherty, will include an educational center, instructional classrooms and 22 new parking spaces for a total of 30. "Every day, people pull in and pull right back out," OCC sustainability coordinator Mike Carey said about the parking in a prepared statement.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Residents can drop off hard-to-dispose-of household items Nov. 17 at a free collection event. The Orange Coast College Recycling Center and the Costa Mesa Sanitary District are sponsoring "Drive-in and Drive-out," a household hazardous waste collection drive from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on campus. Residents can drop off items in Lot C at Fairview Road and Merrimac Way without getting out of their vehicles. The following items will be accepted: motor oil, antifreeze, home and car batteries, cleaning products, pesticides, herbicides, paint, paint thinner, pool chemicals, fuels, polishes, waxes and medicines.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Waldorf School of Orange County's eighth-grade class was honored Friday morning with the Environmental Excellence Award by the city of Costa Mesa for starting a schoolwide recycling program a year ago. The eighth-graders introduced green products to the community at school festivals, are working on creating mini-presentation on the importance of recycling for classrooms, and have applied to start a local chapter of Teens Turning Green, a national organization....
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