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NEWS
James P. Gray | July 1, 2011
The fledgling program TAP America is trying to strengthen the U.S. economy by encouraging people to buy more American products as a matter of patriotism; however, like so many other political proposals, it sounds like a nice idea, but it won't work. Just like Communism's mantra of "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs" sounded good to many people, it simply will not work. A more apt slogan is, "You can't fool Mother Nature. " Why? Because the "invisible hand" of economics is always present.
FEATURES
By JIM RIGHEIMER | December 12, 2008
Bailouts, bankruptcies, recession, foreclosures and layoffs; the news we are getting about the economy makes it look like the world as we know it is about to end. What’s happening in the economy is what has always happened to some extent or another. The economy goes through up-and-down cycles, expansion and recession. No matter what you are being told by the brain trusts in Washington, there is no way to stop these cycles. Remember that this downward cycle will end, and expansion will start.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — The post-recession consumer expects more value and better service for less cash, prominent community business leaders said Wednesday. The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce hosted "Strategies for Growth in a Recovering Economy," a morning seminar at Newport Beach Lexus dealership. Panelists included Jim Walker, owner of The Bungalow; Gary Sherwin, president and chief executive of Visit Newport Beach Inc.; Bobby Sento, sales manager at Newport Lexus; Gavin Herbert Jr., president and CEO of Roger's Gardens; and Shannon Fowler of the American Cancer Society.
BUSINESS
By Candice Baker | December 8, 2009
A sustained but weak recovery was projected for Orange County, and the nation in 2010, at Chapman University’s annual Economic Forecast conference Tuesday in Costa Mesa. Chapman University’s Jim Doti and Esmael Adibi forecasted positive job growth by mid-2010; no significant change in income when adjusted for inflation; lackluster improvement in consumer spending; and a “gloomy” state budget outlook. They also anticipate that median home prices countywide have bottomed out, following a sharp decline during the recession.
BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | December 5, 2007
NEWPORT BEACH — Orange County had the lowest job growth this year of any major urban area in California and may soon be mired in a nationwide recession, a group of business leaders said Tuesday at a forum at the Island Hotel. At a five-hour conference presented by UCI’s Paul Merage School of Business, members of the real estate, construction and home-building industries called the economic forecast gloomy, although they noted a few signs of hope as well. Speakers throughout the event, which the Merage School held for the first time Tuesday, repeatedly used the word “recession” to describe the market’s future — or current — state.
BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | November 25, 2007
It hasn’t been a sterling few months for the U.S. economy. The housing market has dipped, foreclosures have hit record highs in California, and the National Retail Federation predicted in September that the holiday season would experience the lowest sales growth in five years. Then, last week, the Federal Reserve issued a gloomy forecast for 2008, which foresaw a drop in inflation but also a decrease in gross domestic product (GDP) growth and a rise in unemployment. Do Americans have reason to worry as they head into the holiday months and beyond?
LOCAL
By Michael Miller | August 27, 2009
It may be tucked at the back of a nondescript shopping plaza, but once you step inside Crystal Cave, you’ll feel as if you’ve entered a magical realm. The metaphysical bookstore at 891 Baker St., which also offers incense, minerals, figurines and other spiritual items, opened in Orange in 1979 and moved to Costa Mesa 12 years ago. Co-founder Karen Tate spoke with the Daily Pilot about the origins of her business — and what role a spiritual shop plays in a recession.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | September 21, 2009
Editor’s note: This is the second of a three-part series on how the recession is affecting the Newport-Mesa area. Part three will appear Sept. 29. Jenna Tourje sat down earlier this year with the girl she was mentoring for the Mika Community Development Corporation and made a list of things the two of them wanted to do together. The list included going to the beach, baking apple pies and other typical mentor activities — and a couple of more expensive ones, like seeing the New Boyz in concert.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 28, 2012
As taxation and other costs go up in California, one place is looking better and better: Walla Walla. Moving to the eastern Washington town of some 32,000 — where you can rent a mansion for $2,500 a month, have a short commute and not pay state income taxes — was one of the take-aways from economist Esmael Adibi at Chapman University's 35th annual Economic Forecast. "You might say this is a joke," Adibi told the audience at Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa. "It's not a joke.
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NEWS
By Jeremiah Dobruck | November 17, 2012
Putting a finishing touch on the plan the city of Irvine used to weather the recession, the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to increase its goal for future financial reserves by about $7 million. Irvine leaned on its contingency reserves during tough times but was able to refill them after the 2010-11 fiscal year. Now it intends to increase the emergency money from 15% of its general fund to 20%. "We outpaced our worst fears," City Manager Sean Joyce told the council Tuesday as he presented a final wrap-up of the $136-million budget from fiscal year 2011-12, the last step of the three-year plan Irvine instituted to make it through the economic downturn.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | June 28, 2012
Blame it on Osama bin Laden. When municipalities across California and the country are trying to rein in payroll and growing pension costs — particularly those for police and firefighters — Orange County Employees Assn. counsel Don Drozd pointed to the 9/11 terrorist attacks Wednesday as a watershed moment for public safety workers that lead to years of pay increases and cushier retirement packages. Public sentiment was behind them and the recession wasn't on anyone's radar, Drozd said.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 30, 2012
Sunflowers in mason jars dotted the brightly covered tables as inspiration for the Vincent van Gogh-themed art activity, but some students came with their imaginations blazing. "I'm drawing people getting hot lava on them," said kindergartner Luke Hohman, 6, paintbrush in hand over his scene of a giant volcano. "I'm drawing black death," said kindergartner James Gallagher, 5, as he wielded a black colored pencil. "I'm going to draw a spider web with a big, giant spider. " "The sun is getting red," Luke said as he added red paint to his paper.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | February 14, 2012
The Costa Mesa City Council hastily retreated behind closed doors Tuesday night after abruptly calling a recess when a charter proponent spoke far longer than the three minutes afforded to everyone else and egged on hundreds in the crowd who were trying to shout him down. "This is fascism!" Kevin Dayton shouted back at the attendees, who were mostly organized labor workers and residents. By that time, they had created an unintelligible chorus of hisses and shouts at Dayton, a Sacramento native.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | January 31, 2012
NEWPORT BEACH - When the building behind the Port Theatre became available in 2007, longtime Corona del Mar resident Ali Zadeh saw an opportunity. Nevermind that the lack of public parking, economic woes and other issues affecting the space had closed out a handful of previous owners. Zadeh, whose background is in computer engineering, had a plan for what became the Port Restaurant and Bar. "Since I lived here for years and watched all these changes, I thought to myself, 'What if I put something here that the area deserves?
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | September 6, 2011
Last of three parts. COSTA MESA - Jill Fales remembers moving to Mesa Verde three years ago and hearing neighborhood parents recite stereotypes in an effort to dissuade her from enrolling her son in the elementary school down the street. Adams Elementary educated too many immigrant children from the city's Westside, they warned. Not enough of them spoke English at home. Classrooms were not competitive for upper-middle class children. So in heeding the advice, the mother of four filled out transfer paperwork to enroll her son at nearby Hawes Elementary, a public school in Huntington Beach.
NEWS
James P. Gray | July 1, 2011
The fledgling program TAP America is trying to strengthen the U.S. economy by encouraging people to buy more American products as a matter of patriotism; however, like so many other political proposals, it sounds like a nice idea, but it won't work. Just like Communism's mantra of "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs" sounded good to many people, it simply will not work. A more apt slogan is, "You can't fool Mother Nature. " Why? Because the "invisible hand" of economics is always present.
NEWS
April 21, 2011
This column is the last of a three-part series reviewing the history of boatbuilding in Costa Mesa. "I never noticed an industry fall so fast and so complete," Roger MacGregor, founder of MacGregor Yacht Co., recalled. The year was 1980 and the screws were tightened on credit. Kind of sounds familiar to today, doesn't it? "The federal clamp down on consumer credit is not only taking its toll on the housing and auto industries, but on Orange Country multi-million dollar boat building enterprises," John Longwell wrote in a May 1980 article headlined "Boating Blues.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — The post-recession consumer expects more value and better service for less cash, prominent community business leaders said Wednesday. The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce hosted "Strategies for Growth in a Recovering Economy," a morning seminar at Newport Beach Lexus dealership. Panelists included Jim Walker, owner of The Bungalow; Gary Sherwin, president and chief executive of Visit Newport Beach Inc.; Bobby Sento, sales manager at Newport Lexus; Gavin Herbert Jr., president and CEO of Roger's Gardens; and Shannon Fowler of the American Cancer Society.
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