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By Mona Shadia | July 25, 2012
Refraining from food and water all day during Ramadan is not that bad. That's because we still get to eat twice — just before sunrise and again after sunset. There's "iftar," which is the breaking-of-the-fast meal at sunset. But there's also "suhoor," which is a light meal Muslims eat before sunrise to be able to withstand not eating during the day. Right now, the fast starts at about 4:20 a.m. in Southern California. The time varies, depending on location. In Islam, suhoor fall into the category of "sunna," which means it's recommended.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
Deepa Bharath Local Muslims expect today will be the first day of the month of Ramadan, a time of fasting, introspection and prayer. During this month, Muslims all over the world abstain from food and water during the daytime, said Imam Mostafa Al-Qazwini, who heads the Islamic Educational Center of Orange County in Costa Mesa. "We break our fast only a few minutes after sunset," he said. It's a season "of unity, peace, sharing and serving the poor," Qazwini said.
NEWS
December 17, 2001
Bryce Alderton COSTA MESA -- Kamal Chohan stood with Omar Jaber in the bright sunlight Sunday at the Orange County Fairgrounds as the two waited to go to a carnival, eat food with family and friends and exchange gifts. They, along with about 12,000 Muslim worshipers, had just finished an hourlong prayer service Sunday morning as part of Eid al-Fitr, the first of a three-day celebration signifying the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Kamal, 16, and Jaber, 21, were off to a carnival at the Islamic Society of Orange County in Garden Grove, followed by visits to friends and family to enjoy food and one another's company.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 10, 2010
I will be among about 1.5 billion Muslims worldwide who will begin fasting from sunrise to sunset Wednesday. We will observe Ramadan by praying during the night and fasting during the day for the next month. Ramadan, Muslims' holy month, is an exciting time for me. You'd think that with no food or water all day, I'd be upset and grumpy. But the opposite is true. Fasting during Ramadan is the fourth of the five pillars of Islam. Ramadan isn't just about abstaining from food and water, it's about exercising discipline, self-restraint and generosity, said Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Greater Los Angeles Area Chapter of the Council on American Islamic Relations.
NEWS
November 16, 2001
Lolita Harper COSTA MESA -- During a time of renewed focus on the religion of Islam following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, local Muslim leaders said this year's celebration of Ramadan will focus on inclusion and education. When the sun rises Saturday morning, the Muslim community will begin the monthlong holiday, vowing to concentrate on God and abstain from from food, drink and "sensual pleasures" from sun up to sunset. While the holy celebration is deeply rooted in self-purification, Imam Moustafa Al-Qazwini of the Islamic Educational Center of Orange County said he wants the holiday to also serve as an open invitation for non-Muslims to learn about Islamic culture.
NEWS
January 7, 2000
Danette Goulet COSTA MESA -- By the time the new moon came into view Thursday evening, signaling the end of Ramadan and the beginning of the Eid-Ul Fitr celebration, Islamic leaders in Orange County had found a place to gather. Although worshipers may have to pray in two shifts at the Orange County Fairgrounds, at least they have a place to gather, said Thomas Thorkelson, president of the Orange County region of the National Conference for Community and Justice.
NEWS
By Fatma Saleh | August 26, 2011
Thirst, hunger and fatigue shadow Muslims as they fast through the holy month of Ramadan. Ramadan is the ninth lunar month in the Islamic calendar and is recognized as the fasting month for Muslims. From sunrise to sunset, Muslims refrain from food and water, among other things, for an entire month. Muslims in Southern California will fast for nearly 16 hours each day. For Muslims, the fast is recognized as one of the greatest acts of worship. For a fasting person, the objective of the fast entails a variety of spiritual, ethical and moral refinement, and physical consciousness.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 2, 2011
Ramadan began Monday with special significance for Orange County Muslims, who celebrated the democratic tide washing over Egypt and Tunisia but also expressed concern for those who remain in peril in Syria, Libya and other Middle Eastern dictatorships. "It's definitely a Ramadan with a different taste," said Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, Greater Los Angeles Area, in Anaheim. "It comes as the first Ramadan under freedom to tens of millions of Muslims around the world, but who are still dealing with the challenges of instability and the unknown.
FEATURES
By By Elia Powers | October 18, 2005
During Islam's holy month, the faithful gather each Sunday at a local center to break the fast.Fasting from dawn until dusk during the holy month of Ramadan is a common practice for those who follow the teachings of the Koran. It is, perhaps, the most widely recognized component of the annual observance. And Iftar -- the fast-breaking ceremony -- often is the most joyous time of day for Muslims. Inside the Islamic Education Center of Orange County, a one-level building near John Wayne Airport, throngs of Ramadan observers congregate Sunday evenings to dine together and share in ceremonial prayer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | July 19, 2013
Happy Ramadan! I confess that, directed by your letters, I do not write enough about Islam or Muslim spiritual life. To help to correct my lacuna, I've decided not to let the holy Muslim month of Ramadan pass this year without sending along to all of you non-Muslim readers a brief essay about what I truly love about Ramadan. To my Muslim readers, I hope this will serve as a belated apology for my lack of focus on your noble religious traditions in the past, and my most sincere wishes for a "Ramadan Mubarak," a blessed Ramadan.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | August 15, 2012
Something's been keeping me up at night. I haven't had much beauty sleep in the last eight nights, and I'm not due for much more until the end of Ramadan, which is - sadly - on Saturday. I've been up in search of "Laylat ul-Qadr," the night of power. It lasts only for a few hours, from sunset to sunrise, but its significance and possibilities are so great that I cannot risk missing it. It is a night tantamount to 1,000 months of contiguous worship. It is the night when God first revealed the Koran to the Prophet Muhammad through the angel Gabriel more than 1,400 years ago. It is the night when God continuously sends his angels, including Gabriel, to earth, so our planet is literally overflowing with the celestial beings.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | August 8, 2012
Do you know how Christmas is supposed to be about faith? That's what Ramadan is supposed to be about too - God. But like Christmastime, Ramadan, for some, becomes a time for lavish dinner parties and uncontrollable spending. For producers and television stations, it's time to make money from special soap operas (which come right out of Egypt, the Hollywood of the Middle East). Ramadan is supposed to be the month of feeding - feeding those in need, feeding your soul. But for some people and cultures, it's the month of gorging after sunset and seeking entertainment.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | August 1, 2012
The other night I struggled to come up with a simple way to describe the magnitude of "taraweh" — the extra prayers performed nightly during Ramadan. And then an enigmatic Muslim poet I know compared it — perfectly — to opera. There's standing in place in awe of the eloquence of God's words and their melody. There's simultaneous bowing. There's kneeling and prostrating in unison. There's dramatic begging, hands raised toward the sky. There are trembling voices, tears. There are no instruments, but who needs them?
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | July 25, 2012
Refraining from food and water all day during Ramadan is not that bad. That's because we still get to eat twice — just before sunrise and again after sunset. There's "iftar," which is the breaking-of-the-fast meal at sunset. But there's also "suhoor," which is a light meal Muslims eat before sunrise to be able to withstand not eating during the day. Right now, the fast starts at about 4:20 a.m. in Southern California. The time varies, depending on location. In Islam, suhoor fall into the category of "sunna," which means it's recommended.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | July 18, 2012
Ramadan starts Thursday night (insert multiple happy faces here). You would think that because I will be refraining from eating and drinking for about 15 hours a day for the next month, I would be dreading the arrival of Islam's holiest month. You would think that because I'll be cutting down on my nights out with my friends, and, instead, devoting more of my time to praying and reexamining my priorities, I would be a little bummed out. But when it comes to Ramadan, frankly, I can forget the food, the drinks, even the parties.
NEWS
By Fatma Saleh | August 26, 2011
Thirst, hunger and fatigue shadow Muslims as they fast through the holy month of Ramadan. Ramadan is the ninth lunar month in the Islamic calendar and is recognized as the fasting month for Muslims. From sunrise to sunset, Muslims refrain from food and water, among other things, for an entire month. Muslims in Southern California will fast for nearly 16 hours each day. For Muslims, the fast is recognized as one of the greatest acts of worship. For a fasting person, the objective of the fast entails a variety of spiritual, ethical and moral refinement, and physical consciousness.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 2, 2011
Ramadan began Monday with special significance for Orange County Muslims, who celebrated the democratic tide washing over Egypt and Tunisia but also expressed concern for those who remain in peril in Syria, Libya and other Middle Eastern dictatorships. "It's definitely a Ramadan with a different taste," said Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, Greater Los Angeles Area, in Anaheim. "It comes as the first Ramadan under freedom to tens of millions of Muslims around the world, but who are still dealing with the challenges of instability and the unknown.
NEWS
By The Rev. Sarah Halverson | September 10, 2010
Friends, you probably know that Wednesday evening began the celebration of Rosh Hashanah and Thursday marked the end of Ramadan. I spent Wednesday night celebrating Rosh Hashanah with a gathering of rabbis. Together we prayed, sang, ate, laughed and loved as we welcomed in the new year. Muslims mark the end of Ramadan with a celebration of Eid al-Fitr, which takes place over a number of days. This year one of those days falls on Saturday, which, sadly, also marks the ninth anniversary of the terrorist attack on U.S. soil.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 10, 2010
I will be among about 1.5 billion Muslims worldwide who will begin fasting from sunrise to sunset Wednesday. We will observe Ramadan by praying during the night and fasting during the day for the next month. Ramadan, Muslims' holy month, is an exciting time for me. You'd think that with no food or water all day, I'd be upset and grumpy. But the opposite is true. Fasting during Ramadan is the fourth of the five pillars of Islam. Ramadan isn't just about abstaining from food and water, it's about exercising discipline, self-restraint and generosity, said Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Greater Los Angeles Area Chapter of the Council on American Islamic Relations.
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