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By Brianna Bailey | January 27, 2010
State officials have fined Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian after a patient, who was wheeled into a magnetized MRI machine on a metal gurney, was sucked into a giant magnet, crushing her leg, the California Department of Public Health announced today. Hoag will have to pay a $50,000 penalty after state health officials found the hospital failed to protect the health and safety of the patient, state public health officials said. This is the third administrative penalty handed down by the Department of Public Health has handed down to Hoag in the past two years.
BUSINESS
By Brianna Bailey | January 27, 2010
State officials have fined Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian after a patient, who was wheeled into an MRI machine on a metal gurney, was sucked into a giant magnet, crushing her leg, the California Department of Public Health announced Wednesday. Hoag will have to pay a $50,000 penalty after state health officials found the hospital failed to protect the health and safety of the patient, state public health officials said. “We have conducted a full internal investigation and review of the relevant policies and procedures, and have added additional redundant measures to prevent future occurrences,” Hoag Chief Executive Richard Afable said in a written statement.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 24, 2014
Fairview Developmental Center will continue to receive Medicaid funding as long as the hospital improves conditions, according to a news release issued by the California Department of Developmental Services. The California Department of Public Health identified problems at Fairview involving patient care as "immediate jeopardy situations" in an evaluation last year. The assessment put the hospital, which houses 322 developmentally disabled adults, at risk of losing certification and Medicaid funding.
NEWS
January 20, 2014
In the Saturday edition of the Daily Pilot and in the Jan. 16, 2014, Huntington Beach Independent, Assembly candidate Emanuel Patrascu writes that it was Keith Curry and his fellow members on the Newport Beach City Council who brought the issue of the fire rings to the Air Quality Management District. This is false. Councilman Curry, the Newport Beach City Council and the city never initiated any request for regulation or rule making by the AQMD. If Patrascu has any evidence to the contrary, he should present it. If not, he should immediately apologize to Curry, the council and the voters of the 74th Assembly District for these false and reckless charges.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | September 3, 2009
The California Department of Public Health has fined Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian for failing to monitor a patient with an irregular heartbeat who subsequently died, state officials announced Thursday. A state investigation into the incident found the patient, who came to the emergency room at Hoag complaining of chest pains in December, was disconnected from a cardiac monitor for more than 30 minutes during his stay at the hospital. The patient went into cardiac arrest while his heart rate was not being monitored and died, according to a state report on the incident.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 8, 2014
The Fairview Developmental Center in Costa Mesa stands to lose its Medicaid funding for failing to comply with federal standards outlined by the state health department during an investigation conducted last year. The state-run hospital, which houses 322 developmentally disabled adults, is at risk of losing certification and Medicaid funding after the California Department of Public Health last year found deficiencies involving patient care identified as "immediate jeopardy situations," according to a news release.
NEWS
By Frank Peters | April 3, 2013
A battle is raging here in Southern California over wood burning in beach fire rings. Newport Beach decided to remove its 60 fire rings for health reasons, but Huntington Beach was caught napping. Do H.B. officials think that now that a regional agency is proposing to ban all beach burning that they can show up late, with a cute slogan, and win the day? I'm in favor of removing the fire rings, and I recently spoke at the South Coast Air Quality Management District public hearing, where I got to hear H.B.'s arguments.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 6, 2013
SAN DIEGO — Newport Beach residents holding their breath about the fate of the city's beach fire rings will have to wait a bit longer to exhale. The state Coastal Commission decided Wednesday to delay a decision on whether the city can remove 60 fire rings scattered around Corona del Mar and the Balboa Pier. Commissioners put the decision on hold after it came to light that the South Coast Air Quality Management District will consider in May whether to restrict fire pits. While a commission staff report had recommended rejecting the city's application because removing the fire rings would eliminate a free form of recreation, thus limiting public access to the beach, the city has contended that smoke from the rings poses a significant public health risk.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | August 27, 2009
Local agencies are gearing up for an outbreak of H1N1 influenza that could affect as many as one in four Californians this fall, according to the California Department of Public Health. Officials at the nonprofit Share Our Selves, which runs a free community clinic in Costa Mesa, are preparing to be on the frontline of the potential flu epidemic. “As a free clinic who sees people who don’t have access to health care, we expect a lot of people with swine flu will come to clinics like ours,” said Patrick Chen, associate medical director at Share Our Selves.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
Thank you for publishing the story, " Documentary explores grandparent visitation rights," (Sept. 8) about a little-known issue that seems to be a growing problem affecting many families in Orange County and beyond. I am a doting grandparent who enjoys a strong bond with my grandson, however, I do have friends who have been alienated from their grandchildren. I cannot imagine the heartbreak that they endure and will continue to support them in any way that I can. Fortunately, they founded the Advocates for Grandparents organization, with its local support group, which has been a godsend, because of their resources and community outreach.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 24, 2014
Fairview Developmental Center will continue to receive Medicaid funding as long as the hospital improves conditions, according to a news release issued by the California Department of Developmental Services. The California Department of Public Health identified problems at Fairview involving patient care as "immediate jeopardy situations" in an evaluation last year. The assessment put the hospital, which houses 322 developmentally disabled adults, at risk of losing certification and Medicaid funding.
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NEWS
January 20, 2014
In the Saturday edition of the Daily Pilot and in the Jan. 16, 2014, Huntington Beach Independent, Assembly candidate Emanuel Patrascu writes that it was Keith Curry and his fellow members on the Newport Beach City Council who brought the issue of the fire rings to the Air Quality Management District. This is false. Councilman Curry, the Newport Beach City Council and the city never initiated any request for regulation or rule making by the AQMD. If Patrascu has any evidence to the contrary, he should present it. If not, he should immediately apologize to Curry, the council and the voters of the 74th Assembly District for these false and reckless charges.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | January 8, 2014
The Fairview Developmental Center in Costa Mesa stands to lose its Medicaid funding for failing to comply with federal standards outlined by the state health department during an investigation conducted last year. The state-run hospital, which houses 322 developmentally disabled adults, is at risk of losing certification and Medicaid funding after the California Department of Public Health last year found deficiencies involving patient care identified as "immediate jeopardy situations," according to a news release.
NEWS
By Frank Peters | April 3, 2013
A battle is raging here in Southern California over wood burning in beach fire rings. Newport Beach decided to remove its 60 fire rings for health reasons, but Huntington Beach was caught napping. Do H.B. officials think that now that a regional agency is proposing to ban all beach burning that they can show up late, with a cute slogan, and win the day? I'm in favor of removing the fire rings, and I recently spoke at the South Coast Air Quality Management District public hearing, where I got to hear H.B.'s arguments.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 6, 2013
SAN DIEGO — Newport Beach residents holding their breath about the fate of the city's beach fire rings will have to wait a bit longer to exhale. The state Coastal Commission decided Wednesday to delay a decision on whether the city can remove 60 fire rings scattered around Corona del Mar and the Balboa Pier. Commissioners put the decision on hold after it came to light that the South Coast Air Quality Management District will consider in May whether to restrict fire pits. While a commission staff report had recommended rejecting the city's application because removing the fire rings would eliminate a free form of recreation, thus limiting public access to the beach, the city has contended that smoke from the rings poses a significant public health risk.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | February 25, 2013
The fire rings that line Newport Beach should remain in place, says a California Coastal Commission staff report. Members of one of the state's most powerful agencies ought to deny a request by the Newport Beach City Council to remove all 60 fire pits along Corona del Mar State Beach and the area around the Balboa Pier, according to a staff report. The commission will vote on the request to jettison the rings when it meets over three days next week in San Diego. The rings have been the subject of intense debate.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Re. " Wu: Fire rings are a political boomerang," Oct. 14: Jack Wu, haven't you read the letters? How can you invoke the words of Albert Einstein while you ignore the words of highly credentialed wood-smoke toxicology experts? I have a feeling you are behind in your fact checking. A number of experts have told the California Coastal Commission the scientific facts about wood smoke. You might want to stop ranting and start reading. You can find some of these letters, and more, on the city's web page about the fire rings.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
Thank you for publishing the story, " Documentary explores grandparent visitation rights," (Sept. 8) about a little-known issue that seems to be a growing problem affecting many families in Orange County and beyond. I am a doting grandparent who enjoys a strong bond with my grandson, however, I do have friends who have been alienated from their grandchildren. I cannot imagine the heartbreak that they endure and will continue to support them in any way that I can. Fortunately, they founded the Advocates for Grandparents organization, with its local support group, which has been a godsend, because of their resources and community outreach.
NEWS
By Michael Arnold Glueck | March 1, 2010
In previous opinion pieces in the Pilot, I have noted that most physicians are not against health-care reform, but they do want sensible reform that does not throw out the baby with the bathwater. Three days before Thursday’s media event, the president’s proposal was released. These 11 pages do not start with a blank sheet of paper, as some recommended, but with the 2,000-page Senate bill. The $100 billion added to the price tag is but one-tenth of the total $1 trillion.
BUSINESS
By Brianna Bailey | January 27, 2010
State officials have fined Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian after a patient, who was wheeled into an MRI machine on a metal gurney, was sucked into a giant magnet, crushing her leg, the California Department of Public Health announced Wednesday. Hoag will have to pay a $50,000 penalty after state health officials found the hospital failed to protect the health and safety of the patient, state public health officials said. “We have conducted a full internal investigation and review of the relevant policies and procedures, and have added additional redundant measures to prevent future occurrences,” Hoag Chief Executive Richard Afable said in a written statement.
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