Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsPublic Education
IN THE NEWS

Public Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | December 31, 2011
By many measures, 2011 was a momentous year. Osama bin Laden was finally tracked down and killed. The Arab Spring uprisings toppled ruthless regimes. The Eurozone's unity was sorely tested. The Occupy protest movement swept across America. Closer to home, Costa Mesa became a key battleground in the municipal belt-tightening wars. The Newport-Mesa public schools chief was charged with three felony counts that could send him to jail. And a group of teenagers launched an effort to preserve a cherished local icon, the Balboa Fun Zone.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | May 19, 2012
How far should we go to save public education? So far as to name a school gym after a corporate sponsor? Let business interests influence textbook content? Put cigarette and junk food ads on the sides of school buses? If you think these ideas sound far-fetched, think again. As school budgets continue to be squeezed, districts are increasingly tempted to allow an insidious march of corporate marketers onto campus. Bearing gifts of needed school supplies, enrichment programs and outright cash, these businesses come in do-gooder guise, but that pretense does little to camouflage their aims of manipulating the buying decisions of kids and their parents.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 6, 2012
Have you ever been in a building when a fire alarm sounds, and everyone pauses and looks around, not wanting to make the first move or appear the panicked fool who rushes to the exit first? Probably just a false alarm; that's usually the case, we think. And so we hesitate and weigh the risks of hurriedly leaving our comfortable seats and looking uncool in the process versus the very real possibility that the whole blasted place is about to burn to the ground. That's where we are with public education in California.
LOCAL
October 25, 2005
State funds will allow office to target repeat DUI offenders. The Orange County District Attorney's Office launched a campaign Monday to provide increased training for prosecutors and law enforcement officers to enforce drunk-driving laws against repeat offenders. The program, paid for by a $691,631 grant from the state's Office of Traffic Safety, will also provide for public education on the consequences of drunk driving, said Todd Hart, director of government community relations for the Orange County District Attorney's office.
NEWS
By Tom Egan | December 28, 2011
While it is 100% legitimate in our democracy for any resident and any columnist to critique how a school district uses public funds, it's not legitimate to do so in a reckless way and to use fallacious arguments. The latest example of such an attack — seemingly factual and well-reasoned — was published in a recent Daily Pilot ("City Life: Travel should come second to pencils," Dec. 14). This time the local school district superintendent was the target. The columnist apparently couldn't find any showstoppers — no wine, women, song, etc. — after reviewing five years of the (teetotaling)
NEWS
November 30, 2007
A blue-ribbon panel is about to propose a $6.1-billion plan to overhaul public education in the state; but with a looming deficit up to $10 billion, experts think any major changes that cost money will just be shelved. Among the findings are that the state’s schools are “hobbled in red tape, riddled with inefficiencies and impossible for parents and students to understand.” Recommendations include performance-based pay for teachers and empowering elected superintendents for public instruction.
NEWS
By Bill Dunlap | October 17, 2012
Re. " Apodaca: Public education hangs in the balance this election season," (Oct. 7): Ms. Patrice Apodaca's column incorrectly points out that the state ranks 47th in per-student spending. It's actually 35th. Since 1992 per-child spending on public education has increased by 35% adjusted for inflation. In California we spend 52% of the entire state budget on public education. The state's teachers are the third highest paid in the country at $69,343. Is it really more money that we need to throw into education or do we need to change the education process?
NEWS
October 23, 2000
CHARTER SCHOOLS Black said charter schools are great because they "give parents a choice, and they're a community collaborative, which I believe is the future of public education." She has met with local proponents of Mesa Leadership Academy and thinks it's "a fabulous idea -- the wave of the future." But she also wants a detailed explanation of the proposed curriculum and how academy leaders plan to assess it. SCHOOL VOUCHERS She is "dead set against them."
NEWS
May 2, 2001
This column will cost you $25, so let's take care of business up front, shall we? Get out your checkbook and grab a pen. Now, make the check payable to the Costa Mesa Senior Center for $25 (more if you can spare it). Hold on, we're almost done. Drop the check in an envelope and address it to Costa Mesa Senior Center, 695 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, CA 92627. OK, now fling a stamp on that envelope and hold on to it for a moment while you read on. On Friday, while occupying a chair at the Costa Mesa Senior Center's luncheon honoring a dozen of its most treasured volunteers, my mind wandered a bit. But not necessarily off the topic.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | December 10, 2013
Drivers in the area of Arlington Drive and Fairview Road in Costa Mesa on Monday afternoon honked in support of the nearly 30 local teachers and community members huddled on the street corner and waving signs to encourage reform in public schools. The gathering was part of a larger national day of action sponsored by the American Federation of Teachers, a nationwide teachers union, to shed light on issues regarding public education in the United States. In recent years, dwindling budgets for education have resulted in increased class sizes, inadequate support staff in the form of counselors and nurses, and curriculum lacking in art, physical education and science, said Joel Flores, co-chairman of the committee on political education for the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | December 10, 2013
Drivers in the area of Arlington Drive and Fairview Road in Costa Mesa on Monday afternoon honked in support of the nearly 30 local teachers and community members huddled on the street corner and waving signs to encourage reform in public schools. The gathering was part of a larger national day of action sponsored by the American Federation of Teachers, a nationwide teachers union, to shed light on issues regarding public education in the United States. In recent years, dwindling budgets for education have resulted in increased class sizes, inadequate support staff in the form of counselors and nurses, and curriculum lacking in art, physical education and science, said Joel Flores, co-chairman of the committee on political education for the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | November 10, 2012
California is a wondrous place. From the magnificence of the Sierra Nevada to the bounties of the Central Valley to the splendor of the coastline, we are blessed with unrivaled richness and beauty. Silicon Valley has changed the way we live, and Hollywood has inspired us to dream. Our factories have built machines that sent men to the moon. We are steeped in cultural diversity, intellectual adventurousness and old-fashioned know-how. We built arguably the world's finest institutions of public education, from elementary schools to our vaunted universities.
NEWS
By Bill Dunlap | October 17, 2012
Re. " Apodaca: Public education hangs in the balance this election season," (Oct. 7): Ms. Patrice Apodaca's column incorrectly points out that the state ranks 47th in per-student spending. It's actually 35th. Since 1992 per-child spending on public education has increased by 35% adjusted for inflation. In California we spend 52% of the entire state budget on public education. The state's teachers are the third highest paid in the country at $69,343. Is it really more money that we need to throw into education or do we need to change the education process?
NEWS
October 10, 2012
Re. "Apodaca: Public education hangs in the balance Nov. 6," (Column, Oct. 7): Patrice Apodaca pleads with the readers to get behind passing Proposition 30 to fund public education in California. On the surface, it sounds reasonable, but she also makes the point on why we should vote no. It is delusional to think we should send more money to the Democrats in Sacramento and trust them do the right thing. They are in the tank with the teachers unions and have no restraint in reducing spending.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 6, 2012
Have you ever been in a building when a fire alarm sounds, and everyone pauses and looks around, not wanting to make the first move or appear the panicked fool who rushes to the exit first? Probably just a false alarm; that's usually the case, we think. And so we hesitate and weigh the risks of hurriedly leaving our comfortable seats and looking uncool in the process versus the very real possibility that the whole blasted place is about to burn to the ground. That's where we are with public education in California.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | May 19, 2012
How far should we go to save public education? So far as to name a school gym after a corporate sponsor? Let business interests influence textbook content? Put cigarette and junk food ads on the sides of school buses? If you think these ideas sound far-fetched, think again. As school budgets continue to be squeezed, districts are increasingly tempted to allow an insidious march of corporate marketers onto campus. Bearing gifts of needed school supplies, enrichment programs and outright cash, these businesses come in do-gooder guise, but that pretense does little to camouflage their aims of manipulating the buying decisions of kids and their parents.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
The Orange County education superintendent on Thursday announced his intent to retire at the end of the year. Superintendent of Schools William M. Habermehl will retire June 29 after 11 years on the job, he told the Orange County Board of Education at its meeting, according to a new release. "It has been a great honor and privilege to have served as superintendent of this exceptional county," Habermehl said, according to the release. "I have had the opportunity in this position to work with outstanding staff, educators, board members, parents and community members who are doing incredible work for the students of Orange County.
NEWS
By Tom Egan | December 28, 2011
While it is 100% legitimate in our democracy for any resident and any columnist to critique how a school district uses public funds, it's not legitimate to do so in a reckless way and to use fallacious arguments. The latest example of such an attack — seemingly factual and well-reasoned — was published in a recent Daily Pilot ("City Life: Travel should come second to pencils," Dec. 14). This time the local school district superintendent was the target. The columnist apparently couldn't find any showstoppers — no wine, women, song, etc. — after reviewing five years of the (teetotaling)
NEWS
By Crissy Brooks | June 2, 2011
My sister was wearing her "I love Costa Mesa" pin on our trip up the Central Coast. "What's so great about Costa Mesa?" a proprietor of one of the region's wineries asked her. That's the wrong question to ask my sister. She leaned across the counter and began the whole list of things that make our city great: the first Wahoo's Fish Tacos, Mitch Hurwitz, the creator of "Arrested Development," the surfwear industry, South Coast Plaza, hub of Orange County performing arts, a free train, international headquarters of several justice organizations, Cla-Val who has the valve contract for the world's tallest building, our recycling program and community gardens.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|