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NEWS
May 31, 2003
June Casagrande Valet parking does not create the kind of welcoming public access that the Balboa Bay Club should promote, a California Coastal Commission official says. Commission representatives say they will visit the just-renovated Bay Club next week to make sure that free self-parking is easily accessible to the public. "Historically, this is a private club that now is being opened up to the public. The perception created by all-valet parking is that this is either exclusive or private," said Teresa Henry, district manager of the California Coastal Commission's South Coast District.
NEWS
December 14, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- Newly appointed Mayor Tod Ridgeway is spearheading an effort to preserve the public's right to use a handful of walkways in the city. In his first campaign after the Tuesday appointment by his colleagues, Ridgeway on Wednesday asked for an internal review of the 13 quasi-public areas. The state's Coastal Conservancy has been pressuring local agencies across the state to accept more than 1,200 walkways, sidewalks and other access ways.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | August 4, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Since its remodeling, the Irvine Co.-owned Balboa Marina has become a not-so-fun zone in a conflict pitting public access against private property rights. An ambiguous condition that required increased public access to the marina placed on the Irvine Co.’s 2007 plans by Newport Harbor Resources is under evaluation by City Atty. David Hunt to determine whether the terms have been satisfied, said Harbor Resources Manager Chris Miller. According to documents presented to the Harbor Commission, the marina was downsized from 132 boat slips to 102, but with several slips that now meet the legal criteria for people with disabilities.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | July 28, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Residents of a private island in Newport Bay are suing the California Coastal Commission to keep their pedestrian bridge from opening to the public. The Coastal Commission contends that The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homeowners on the tiny island by that name, must allow public access to the bridge if the club wants to replace the aging 130-foot span. It's a classic example of the struggle between private landowners and state government, which, since the 1976 passage of the Coastal Act, has aggressively protected the public's access to shorelines and waterways.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | August 17, 2011
The California Coastal Commission prevailed in its lawsuit to open Newport Harbor's Bay Island bridge to the public, but the island's residents will likely fight the judge's decision. Last week, the attorney representing the residents filed court documents that could provide the basis for an appeal. At stake is access to the 130-foot span, which commission officials say should be available for all to use. If the residents lose the appeal, they may be able to retrofit the existing bridge and keep it private, or they could build a new bridge, in which case they would have to comply with the commission's order.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
Lost among the statewide propositions concerning Indian gaming and the race for the presidency of the United States is a little-known proposed amendment to the state's Constitution known as Proposition 59. While it has been overshadowed by bigger and sexier campaigns, the truth is this initiative strikes a blow against those who would deny the people's right to know what the government is doing. Proposition 59's passage would strengthen the Ralph M. Brown Act and the California Public Records Act and make it a state constitutional right for the public and journalists, acting on behalf of the public, to access governmental meetings and governmental documents.
NEWS
November 7, 2000
It was not the end of an era, but the beginning of a new one Monday as part of the historic Balboa Bay Club was demolished as part of a much-needed renovation project. The Bay Club, which opened in 1948 and was made famous by its movie star patrons, will see changes to more than just its image. Bulldozers rolled into the building to begin construction that will open parts of the swanky club -- once frequented by Frank Sinatra and Humphrey Bogart -- to the public.
NEWS
November 18, 2003
June Casagrande Once the Local Coastal Plan is completed and approved, developers will be able to go to the city instead of the Coastal Commission for some permits; nearly two dozen commercial property owners who are supposed to provide public access to the water will be forced to do so; and a $1,000-a-month fine the city now pays will stop. But that could take a while. City Councilman Tod Ridgeway, who chairs the committee working to create the document, said that the city might be able to apply for Coastal Commission approval of the document by April, at which time a $1,000-a-month late charge that began in June would end. The Local Coastal Plan is basically a local interpretation of the Coastal Act. That act provides for public access to and preservation of the nation's coastal areas.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | June 15, 2012
A private island community in Newport Harbor will retain control of a bridge that connects it to the Balboa Peninsula, an appellate court ruled Thursday. The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homes that owns Bay Island, sought the California Coastal Commission's approval in 2006 to replace its private foot path with one that would be wider, meet seismic standards and have accessibility requirements that comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. At the time, the commission argued that the association could rebuild the 130-foot-long bridge, providing it be made public because it would span a city-owned canal.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | February 3, 2011
An Orange County judge ruled against the residents of a private island in Newport Bay in their fight to keep their footbridge from being opened to the public. The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homeowners, had sued the California Coastal Commission after the commission ordered the association to make the bridge to the island accessible to everyone. One of the commission's charges is to expand the public's access to the coast. Superior Court Judge Tam Nomoto rejected most aspects of the residents' case late last year, and the ruling was announced in January.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Whitehead | March 20, 2013
Ahoy! I remember a time in my youth when I was tossing newspapers while pedaling my Schwinn three-speed bike through the Bayshore Trailer Park. Some of you might remember that the park was located at the northeast corner of Dover Drive and Pacific Coast Highway in Newport Beach. I vividly remember the friendly tenants who greeted me daily, and that they had their own private boat launch ramp into the Back Bay. I also remember the small retail center that was located next to the park fronting along the Coast Highway.
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NEWS
By Jill Cowan | March 6, 2013
SAN DIEGO — Newport Beach residents holding their breath about the fate of the city's beach fire rings will have to wait a bit longer to exhale. The state Coastal Commission decided Wednesday to delay a decision on whether the city can remove 60 fire rings scattered around Corona del Mar and the Balboa Pier. Commissioners put the decision on hold after it came to light that the South Coast Air Quality Management District will consider in May whether to restrict fire pits. While a commission staff report had recommended rejecting the city's application because removing the fire rings would eliminate a free form of recreation, thus limiting public access to the beach, the city has contended that smoke from the rings poses a significant public health risk.
NEWS
By Jill Cowan | February 25, 2013
The fire rings that line Newport Beach should remain in place, says a California Coastal Commission staff report. Members of one of the state's most powerful agencies ought to deny a request by the Newport Beach City Council to remove all 60 fire pits along Corona del Mar State Beach and the area around the Balboa Pier, according to a staff report. The commission will vote on the request to jettison the rings when it meets over three days next week in San Diego. The rings have been the subject of intense debate.
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | June 15, 2012
A private island community in Newport Harbor will retain control of a bridge that connects it to the Balboa Peninsula, an appellate court ruled Thursday. The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homes that owns Bay Island, sought the California Coastal Commission's approval in 2006 to replace its private foot path with one that would be wider, meet seismic standards and have accessibility requirements that comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. At the time, the commission argued that the association could rebuild the 130-foot-long bridge, providing it be made public because it would span a city-owned canal.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | August 17, 2011
The California Coastal Commission prevailed in its lawsuit to open Newport Harbor's Bay Island bridge to the public, but the island's residents will likely fight the judge's decision. Last week, the attorney representing the residents filed court documents that could provide the basis for an appeal. At stake is access to the 130-foot span, which commission officials say should be available for all to use. If the residents lose the appeal, they may be able to retrofit the existing bridge and keep it private, or they could build a new bridge, in which case they would have to comply with the commission's order.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | February 3, 2011
An Orange County judge ruled against the residents of a private island in Newport Bay in their fight to keep their footbridge from being opened to the public. The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homeowners, had sued the California Coastal Commission after the commission ordered the association to make the bridge to the island accessible to everyone. One of the commission's charges is to expand the public's access to the coast. Superior Court Judge Tam Nomoto rejected most aspects of the residents' case late last year, and the ruling was announced in January.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | August 4, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Since its remodeling, the Irvine Co.-owned Balboa Marina has become a not-so-fun zone in a conflict pitting public access against private property rights. An ambiguous condition that required increased public access to the marina placed on the Irvine Co.’s 2007 plans by Newport Harbor Resources is under evaluation by City Atty. David Hunt to determine whether the terms have been satisfied, said Harbor Resources Manager Chris Miller. According to documents presented to the Harbor Commission, the marina was downsized from 132 boat slips to 102, but with several slips that now meet the legal criteria for people with disabilities.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | July 28, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — Residents of a private island in Newport Bay are suing the California Coastal Commission to keep their pedestrian bridge from opening to the public. The Coastal Commission contends that The Bay Island Club, an association of 24 homeowners on the tiny island by that name, must allow public access to the bridge if the club wants to replace the aging 130-foot span. It's a classic example of the struggle between private landowners and state government, which, since the 1976 passage of the Coastal Act, has aggressively protected the public's access to shorelines and waterways.
FEATURES
By Brady Rhoades | June 11, 2009
Newport Beach Police Chief John Klein resigned this week amid a cloud of controversy and unanswered questions. The Police Department has been left in shambles. Who’s going to be appointed interim chief? Are they going to lift Klein’s moratorium on promotions? What about morale? Who wants to go to a workplace that resembles, figuratively, the ruins of a civil war? How is the city going to ensure that it follows proper protocol when it hires the next chief? These are difficult — maybe impossible — questions to answer.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
Lost among the statewide propositions concerning Indian gaming and the race for the presidency of the United States is a little-known proposed amendment to the state's Constitution known as Proposition 59. While it has been overshadowed by bigger and sexier campaigns, the truth is this initiative strikes a blow against those who would deny the people's right to know what the government is doing. Proposition 59's passage would strengthen the Ralph M. Brown Act and the California Public Records Act and make it a state constitutional right for the public and journalists, acting on behalf of the public, to access governmental meetings and governmental documents.
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