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Property Crimes

NEWS
November 1, 2001
Crime statistics for Huntington Beach turned out to be a mixed, though mostly encouraging, bag during the first six months of the year. While overall crime in the city went up 5%, according to the California Crime Statistics released by state Attorney General Bill Lockyer, the most worrisome violent crimes all went down more than the state average. Homicide, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault all dropped 7.7%, down from 183 incidents to 169. That included no homicides for the second straight year and compared overall to a state drop of just 1.5%.
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NEWS
January 18, 2004
The news wasn't the greatest, but not the worst, either. The state attorney general's office figures for the city of Costa Mesa show an overall increase in crime of 1.4%, with violent crimes climbing by 10.4% in the first nine months of 2003. In property crimes, the numbers were better, with the number of incidents dropping by 1.6%. But inside the numbers was a little more disturbing trend. Incidents of rape were up 154%. And of those cases of rape, 28 of them, two were unfounded and only four actually turned into charges filed, police said.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Deepa Bharath Amid a significant drop in crime overall in the first six half of 2003 compared to the same time in 2002, 22 rapes were recorded, an increase of 340%, according to a report released Wednesday by the state attorney general. Overall, crime dropped by 6.1% in Costa Mesa between January and June compared to 2002, according to the report. Violent crimes -- murder, rape, robbery and assault -- were down by 10.8% overall. Property crimes -- burglaries and auto thefts -- showed a 6.4% decrease.
NEWS
February 20, 2003
We try never to get too excited, or too worried, about changing crime statistics in our cities. One reason is the very nature of statistics, which can be manipulating in almost any way and in support of almost any argument. Take this example from a safe city, one that looks like either Costa Mesa or Newport Beach. In one year, there is a single murder. The next year, there are two. How do you look at the change? You can see it rationally as a minor increase, one that is terrible given the value of human life, but an increase that almost certainly signals no major trend or change.
NEWS
November 7, 2004
PUBLIC SAFETY Reports of violent crime are up in Costa Mesa Property crimes in Costa Mesa for the first six months of this year were down slightly in the city, but violent crimes are up 8.9% from last year, according to data released this week by the state attorney general. In raw numbers, that boils down to 11 more violent crimes -- 124 last year compared to 135 this year from the month of January through June. Costa Mesa had 909 reported property crimes, compared with 924 in the first six months of last year.
NEWS
October 29, 2002
Deepa Bharath Crime figures for 2001 shot up in Costa Mesa and showed a mild increase in Newport Beach, according to the 2001 Uniform Crime Report released by the FBI on Monday. The total number of crimes in Costa Mesa went up by 16.1%, while crime in Newport Beach rose by 1.9% compared to the year 2000, the report showed. For Costa Mesa, the highest increases were reflected in robberies, which skyrocketed by 115.2%. Also in the category of violent crimes, forcible rape was up by 27.2% and assaults increased by 13.4%.
NEWS
May 31, 2001
Deepa Bharath COSTA MESA -- The city ranked 30th in the country and seventh in the county on a list of the nation's safest cities, according to preliminary 2000 Uniform Crime Reporting figures released by the FBI on Wednesday. Numbers show that the city's overall crime rate dropped 4% compared with last year's statistics. According to the report, among Orange County cities with a population of more than 100,000, Irvine tops the list, followed by Huntington Beach, Orange, Anaheim, Santa Ana, Garden Grove, Costa Mesa and Fullerton.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Harlan | June 7, 2013
Comedian Louis C.K. has a routine, "Of Course, but Maybe," where he challenges long-held beliefs. Humorously, he illuminates the dark side of principles we generally accept - of course children with nut allergies should be protected and a soldier injured in war is tragic and slavery is the most awful thing ever. The "Of Course, but Maybe" dichotomy came to mind when I read Mayor Pro Tem Steve Mensinger's final remarks in The Current commentary about keeping the city's business license tax low (" Low licensing fees make Costa Mesa an attractive home for entrepreneurs ," June 5)
NEWS
June 26, 2012
I always appreciate the thoughtful comments by my friend Tamar Goldmann (Re. "Council agenda is harming public services," June 21), but this time, I think she reached several wrong conclusions. Let me explain why. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version had Tamar Goldmann's last name misspelled. First, she said crime is up in Costa Mesa. The fact is, violent crime is actually down. Property crimes are up by 11%, and that is why this City Council has restructured the Police Department in such a way that more officers are patrolling our streets than ever before.
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