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NEWS
By Joseph Serna | June 7, 2012
Three Newport Beach men are among a list of the top 50 political donors in California over the last decade, according to an online watchdog group. Coming in at Nos. 8, 18 and 29, respectively, Broadcom founderHenry T. Nicholas III, home design firm Chief Executive William H. Lyon and real estate developer Bruce E. Harrington combined have contributed about $13 million toward state measures, candidates and political parties, according to California Watch. Both Nicholas and Harrington earned their place on the list mostly through millions in donations during a single campaign cycle to promote measures they were involved in. Nicholas, a Newport Coast resident, spent nearly $5 million in 2008 backing Proposition 9, also known as Marsy's Law, named after his sister.
NEWS
By Chriss Street | December 21, 2011
With the rise of Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) in the presidential primary polls, America may be ready to crush crony capitalists by embracing "libertarianism. " As the founding philosophy that once unified our nation, today libertarianism represents the true existential threat to the crony capitalism that has flourished for decades in both established political parties. But with both political parties in decay and independents positioned to determine the outcome of next year's presidential and congressional elections, voters seem ready to embrace a political philosophy that puts strict limits on all government activity in order to maximize individual liberty and economic freedom.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | November 16, 2010
On the floor of the U.S. Senate, at the desk of the clerk of the Democratic Party, is a sheet of paper that is prepared before each vote. The paper lists the day's pending votes and tells senators whether to vote yea or nay. The Republican Party does the same. In fact, all over the country, every day, party leaders are telling elected representatives how to vote. It is standard operating procedure so that each party can ensure its agenda moves forward. The practice is institutionalized via the party "whip," whose primary responsibility is to ensure that members vote the party line.
NEWS
By Sherry Nord Marron | January 21, 2009
George Washington, the father of our country, was the unanimous choice of the Electoral College in April 1789. It took him a week to travel from his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia to the capital in New York City. Washington was honored in every small village and along every countryside road with celebrations. Every citizen knew and loved him as the commander in chief of the Continental Army and happily anticipated his leadership. The first inauguration of the president of the United States was in New York City on the second floor balcony of Federal Hall.
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | September 16, 2007
Is it just me, or do you also feel that our presidential elections are an enormously expensive, all-consuming and never-ending practice? If so, why not restore some sensibility in our democracy, or what is left of it after the congressional gerrymandering of the electoral districts, and try two things quite differently? The first would be to change the scheduling of the presidential primary elections, and the second would be to change the funding of the elections themselves. As to scheduling, what if our country were divided geographically or otherwise into four sections for our presidential primary elections?
NEWS
By Ron Kaye | February 21, 2013
When I retired five years ago after a career as a rather maverick newspaperman bristling at the restraints of corporate journalism, I vowed to speak what was in my heart and to say "yes" to just about everything. Being a yes-man instead of a naysayer has worked out wonderfully for the most part, but it has also gotten me into some awkward situations as it did when Leslie Dutton — the woman behind the Full Disclosure Network's public access video investigative reporting — asked me to play the role of George Washington in full costume at her annual fundraising event this President's Day weekend.
NEWS
March 3, 2000
If you're bogged down by ballot measures and confused by candidates, it may be time for a little levity, with social satire from Newport libraries. You can read about the dramatic rise and dizzying fall of Al Franken, author of "I'm Good Enough, I'm Smart Enough, and Doggone It, People Like Me," in "Why Not Me," a riotous sendup of presidential politics in which the 44th presidential wannabe makes his way to the nation's highest office by focusing relentlessly on ATM fees.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 19, 2006
Say goodbye to any pretense of nonpartisan offices ? even city council. The Orange County GOP has begun the endorsement process for November elections, this time widely expanding its endorsements in traditionally nonpartisan local races like city council, school board and even the water district board. Newport Beach City Council members Keith Curry and Leslie Daigle, and Costa Mesa Mayor Allan Mansoor received endorsements at a Monday meeting of the party's central committee.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
Orange County -- and Newport-Mesa in particular -- is often touted as being among the most concentrated, powerful bastions of Republicanism in the country. The county GOP, for instance, calls it "America's Most Republican County" and claims some 200,000 registered Republicans. High-powered Republican visits and fund-raisers are typical (at the end of the month, there is one for Katherine Harris' Florida congressional bid, for instance). President Bush carried the county by double-digit figures but lost California, as a whole, by 12%. It has senior Republican representation in the House, led by Chris Cox, who is among the party's leadership.
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NEWS
By Ron Kaye | February 21, 2013
When I retired five years ago after a career as a rather maverick newspaperman bristling at the restraints of corporate journalism, I vowed to speak what was in my heart and to say "yes" to just about everything. Being a yes-man instead of a naysayer has worked out wonderfully for the most part, but it has also gotten me into some awkward situations as it did when Leslie Dutton — the woman behind the Full Disclosure Network's public access video investigative reporting — asked me to play the role of George Washington in full costume at her annual fundraising event this President's Day weekend.
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NEWS
By Joseph Serna | June 7, 2012
Three Newport Beach men are among a list of the top 50 political donors in California over the last decade, according to an online watchdog group. Coming in at Nos. 8, 18 and 29, respectively, Broadcom founderHenry T. Nicholas III, home design firm Chief Executive William H. Lyon and real estate developer Bruce E. Harrington combined have contributed about $13 million toward state measures, candidates and political parties, according to California Watch. Both Nicholas and Harrington earned their place on the list mostly through millions in donations during a single campaign cycle to promote measures they were involved in. Nicholas, a Newport Coast resident, spent nearly $5 million in 2008 backing Proposition 9, also known as Marsy's Law, named after his sister.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | May 22, 2012
Marshall B. Krupp wants to see business handled differently in Costa Mesa, so he has added his name to the list of City Council candidates. "It's time for there to be a new, refreshing approach to representing the community," said Krupp, a business consultant who has lived in the city for eight years. "I want to bring a nonpolitical approach to decision-making. " Although a registered Republican, Krupp, 62, said he doesn't align himself with any one political party or a particular member of the council.
NEWS
By Chriss Street | December 21, 2011
With the rise of Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) in the presidential primary polls, America may be ready to crush crony capitalists by embracing "libertarianism. " As the founding philosophy that once unified our nation, today libertarianism represents the true existential threat to the crony capitalism that has flourished for decades in both established political parties. But with both political parties in decay and independents positioned to determine the outcome of next year's presidential and congressional elections, voters seem ready to embrace a political philosophy that puts strict limits on all government activity in order to maximize individual liberty and economic freedom.
NEWS
By Steve Smith | November 16, 2010
On the floor of the U.S. Senate, at the desk of the clerk of the Democratic Party, is a sheet of paper that is prepared before each vote. The paper lists the day's pending votes and tells senators whether to vote yea or nay. The Republican Party does the same. In fact, all over the country, every day, party leaders are telling elected representatives how to vote. It is standard operating procedure so that each party can ensure its agenda moves forward. The practice is institutionalized via the party "whip," whose primary responsibility is to ensure that members vote the party line.
NEWS
By Sherry Nord Marron | January 21, 2009
George Washington, the father of our country, was the unanimous choice of the Electoral College in April 1789. It took him a week to travel from his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia to the capital in New York City. Washington was honored in every small village and along every countryside road with celebrations. Every citizen knew and loved him as the commander in chief of the Continental Army and happily anticipated his leadership. The first inauguration of the president of the United States was in New York City on the second floor balcony of Federal Hall.
NEWS
By JAMES P. GRAY | September 16, 2007
Is it just me, or do you also feel that our presidential elections are an enormously expensive, all-consuming and never-ending practice? If so, why not restore some sensibility in our democracy, or what is left of it after the congressional gerrymandering of the electoral districts, and try two things quite differently? The first would be to change the scheduling of the presidential primary elections, and the second would be to change the funding of the elections themselves. As to scheduling, what if our country were divided geographically or otherwise into four sections for our presidential primary elections?
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 29, 2007
Orange County Employees Assn. head Nick Berardino proposed a bipartisan effort Tuesday to recall county Treasurer Chriss Street, who is under investigation by county and federal officials for alleged improprieties. Berardino asked the county Democratic, Republican and Libertarian parties as well, as elected officials and political fundraising groups to form a recall committee, but so far it’s not clear who will agree to participate. “Our effort will only be successful if we have a nonpartisan approach,” said Berardino, who as a union leader has sometimes been at odds with Republican elected officials.
NEWS
July 23, 2007
If the 2008 presidential primary were held solely at the Orange County Fair over the last week, we'd be looking at a November fight between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Rudy Giuliani. Folks from each party man booths at the fair annually, but political volunteers said Friday the buzz this year is about who looks good for president in 2008. "Everybody's wondering if people are ready for a woman or if they're ready for a black [president]," said Peg Marshall, who was working the Orange County Democrats' table.
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