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NEWS
By: Elia Powers | August 25, 2005
Back when Atari video game systems weren't considered retro, Yucef Merhi was playing around with words and video cords. The Venezuelan-born Merhi wrote poems as a hobby and mastered the Atari 2600 by the time he had reached junior high. That was when he decided to get creative by mixing the mediums. Through programming ingenuity, Merhi wired the Atari to act like a primitive computer, enabling him to post poetic messages on the video screen. He then gave others the chance to fiddle with his words.
FEATURES
By Library Staff | April 24, 2010
Did you know that April is National Poetry Month? If you’ve been looking for a creative outlet, why not take this opportunity to try your hand at poetry? A great place to start is to get an understanding of the history of poetry and poetic forms. Listen to the Book on CD “A Way with Words IV: Understanding Poetry” to get a thorough overview from Wheaton College English professor Michael Drout . Drout surveys the history of poetry from the early oral tradition to contemporary poetry, discussing different forms and features you might want to employ as you start to write poems of your own. There are several great books to help you learn traditional forms and poetic structures.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 16, 2013
Chip Fesko keeps a folder of his past correspondence, a nearly inch-thick stack of the words that cause less-resilient authors to pack it in: "We have now had a chance to consider your material, and we regret to say that it is not right for us. " "After a great deal of discussion, we came to the unhappy conclusion that we are not ready to expand our market... " "Thank you for your recent query. ... Unfortunately, it does not suit our editorial needs at the moment. " That binder, quite a bit thicker than Fesko's actual manuscript, contains some rejection letters so old they were written on manual typewriters.
FEATURES
By Cindy Trane Christeson | May 14, 2010
Babies make me smile. Babies make me sing. Babies make me laugh at all the sweet sounds and funny faces they make, but the newest little baby in our lives does something else. This little baby boy makes poetry happen. I don’t know what it is about our new grandson Declan, but when he was less than 10 hours old, his 6 year-old sister, Mary, had already made up several poems about him. Maybe it was the months of building excitement in his family, especially for his sisters and brother.
NEWS
January 6, 2001
Young Chang COSTA MESA -- Mabel Knowles, an 87-year-old Christian poet, faces what she calls discrimination because the Costa Mesa Senior Center's new director has banned her religious rhymes, which have been published in the center's monthly newsletter without controversy for the last five years, . Aviva Goelman, the center's director, told Knowles her that her "Try Prayer" poem was not suitable for the November issue...
NEWS
September 11, 2001
Deirdre Newman There's a poetry revolution brewing in Joe Norris' fifth-grade classroom at Victoria Elementary School in Costa Mesa. Norris introduced his students to his penchant for poetry during the first week of school and their reaction was overwhelmingly positive. "He made it really fun for us," said Courtney Ulrich, 10. Norris instructed his students to write "I Am" poems on Friday as part of a language arts lesson. The poems are comprised of several statements starting with "I" that encourage the students to express themselves creatively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | September 12, 2013
Once in a while, a venue sports a plaque declaring that literary history took place there: that a famous author lived in this house, a great songwriter penned a tune on this train platform, and so on. If Alta Coffee ever seeks to honor poet John Perry, it might want to put a miniature sign on each of its napkin dispensers. Not that the Newport Beach coffeehouse was the only location where Perry wrote the original drafts of his new book, "Notes on Napkins. " Those small bits of paper span eateries up and down the coast, from the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf to Tully's Coffee.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 26, 2014
I don't have a recording of the first poetry feature I ever gave, but part of me is glad I don't. As I recall, I was dreadful. Like any nervous undergraduate facing a big-time venue - well, Alta Coffee in Newport Beach, although it might as well have been Carnegie Hall - I overprepared the poems and under-enjoyed the occasion. Rather than treat a coffeehouse reading like the jovial get-together it was, I thought of it as a one-man show to be delivered with intense precision. Before the reading, I rehearsed my set down to the transitions between pieces - which proved difficult, since I was paired on the bill with a guitarist who had a decidedly looser approach.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Young Chang In Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "100 Years of Solitude," people in the town of Macondo live for more than a century. Some resurrect after death. One dead man's ghost visits his killer's home to look for water in the kitchen to use on his wounds. This is "magical realism," a term that describes Latin American literature during the 1960s. The technique is to make magic seem real. Most people connect it with literature. But Marilyn Ellis, a Corona del Mar artist, has translated the style to visual mono prints, a technique in which the artist paints on a sheet of plexiglass on an engraving press that is then used to create one print.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
Patricia Dreyfus The morning is crisp, and the weather here is like Southern California. I wear my rebozo and good walking shoes to navigate the ancient cobblestone streets of San Miguel de Allende in Mexico. The shopkeepers are washing the sidewalks before they open for the day. I see no neon signs, fast-food restaurants, billboards or traffic lights. In the Jardin, the central plaza of the town, vendors are setting up shop under the sheltering fig trees, and the pink morning light glows on the facade of La Parroquia, the central church.
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NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 26, 2014
I don't have a recording of the first poetry feature I ever gave, but part of me is glad I don't. As I recall, I was dreadful. Like any nervous undergraduate facing a big-time venue - well, Alta Coffee in Newport Beach, although it might as well have been Carnegie Hall - I overprepared the poems and under-enjoyed the occasion. Rather than treat a coffeehouse reading like the jovial get-together it was, I thought of it as a one-man show to be delivered with intense precision. Before the reading, I rehearsed my set down to the transitions between pieces - which proved difficult, since I was paired on the bill with a guitarist who had a decidedly looser approach.
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NEWS
December 18, 2013
'Decking Costa Mesa City Hall' 'Twas the holiday season at Costa Mesa City Hall, Closed sessions 'o plenty, council meetings to stall. Council photos are hung, in the lobby; we stare - With hopes that next year, new pics might be there. When all of a sudden, very few were to chatter, Public comments postponed - free speech doesn't matter. Potholes, infrastructure in need of repair, Alleged budget surplus may not really be there. On Police, on Fire, on Miscellaneous - our unions, On Pensions, on Liabilities - with funding disillusions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | December 3, 2013
When I was 12, I got a copy of Simon and Garfunkel's "Bookends" album and found myself transfixed by the bridge of the song "Old Friends. " The lyrics, sung in a fragile tenor by Art Garfunkel, declare, "Can you imagine us years from today, sharing a park bench quietly? How terribly strange to be 70. " Seventy seemed terribly strange then, and now that I am 34, it still does — as does 35, 40 and every other age in between. Perhaps I live in a constant state of denial; perhaps many of us do. We are surrounded by people further on the path of life and know that we'll someday catch up to them, but how easy is it to imagine our own hair grayer, our own face more lined and our head filled with decades more knowledge?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | September 12, 2013
Once in a while, a venue sports a plaque declaring that literary history took place there: that a famous author lived in this house, a great songwriter penned a tune on this train platform, and so on. If Alta Coffee ever seeks to honor poet John Perry, it might want to put a miniature sign on each of its napkin dispensers. Not that the Newport Beach coffeehouse was the only location where Perry wrote the original drafts of his new book, "Notes on Napkins. " Those small bits of paper span eateries up and down the coast, from the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf to Tully's Coffee.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
Season End Hot and sticky, must be 90 Fans wearing shorts and sandals Spaghetti straps and cut off jeans Long legs below. Lame duck game, last of the season Win or lose, it doesn't count Bats making contact but few hits Too many pop-ups, too many strikeouts Fans trying hard to show appreciation But just seems like everyone's half a step slow. Four guys in front drinking ice cold Coronas At 10 bucks a pop, came with lemon on top Girl two rows up with summer sun-bleached hair, Shining like spun gold in a braid down her back Watch out for that fly ball!
NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 16, 2013
Chip Fesko keeps a folder of his past correspondence, a nearly inch-thick stack of the words that cause less-resilient authors to pack it in: "We have now had a chance to consider your material, and we regret to say that it is not right for us. " "After a great deal of discussion, we came to the unhappy conclusion that we are not ready to expand our market... " "Thank you for your recent query. ... Unfortunately, it does not suit our editorial needs at the moment. " That binder, quite a bit thicker than Fesko's actual manuscript, contains some rejection letters so old they were written on manual typewriters.
NEWS
By Benjamin J. Hubbard and By Benjamin J. Hubbard | December 21, 2012
RACHEL Rachel is mourning again for her children, not in far Bethlehem where carnage came to innocents, but in Newtown, where first-graders were gunned down. Yes, gunned down, because we kill so many children year by blood-soaked year with weapons meant for war or self-defense but seized upon by raging men who get them, oh, so easily. We are the species so grand in virtue, so terrible in crime. We are the species so capable of wondrous goodness, so depraved in violence.
NEWS
By Mike Whitehead | December 19, 2012
Ahoy! Ah, Christmas arrives Tuesday, and I cannot wait to see what Santa Claus has left under our tree. Once again, my updated my annual Christmas poem as I weigh anchor for Christmas: 'Twas the Day Before Christmas Upon Orange County's Harbor 'Twas the day before Christmas, and all through the Harbor, You could see a few boats sailing on the water. And sea lions were hauled out on Harbor's entrance buoy, With the bell clanging with each passing swell.
FEATURES
By Cindy Trane Christeson | May 14, 2010
Babies make me smile. Babies make me sing. Babies make me laugh at all the sweet sounds and funny faces they make, but the newest little baby in our lives does something else. This little baby boy makes poetry happen. I don’t know what it is about our new grandson Declan, but when he was less than 10 hours old, his 6 year-old sister, Mary, had already made up several poems about him. Maybe it was the months of building excitement in his family, especially for his sisters and brother.
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