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Passover

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NEWS
April 14, 2000
Danette Goulet NEWPORT BEACH -- Boisterous 2- and 3-year-olds built pyramids, suffered plagues and walked through the deserts of Egypt on Thursday in a reenactment of the story of Passover. The bright-eyed boys and girls had heard the stories of the Jewish people's liberation from slavery and flight from ancient Egypt, but to experience a "Passover pilgrimage" was an educational treat for them. "It was fun," said 3-year-old Zoe Condon before she hurried after Cantor Jonathan Grant, who was dressed as Moses.
NEWS
April 19, 2000
Dana Bushee' College student Dave Khalili left his job at the Costa Mesa-based Bureau of Jewish Education of Orange County last weekend to help his family with spring cleaning. The cleanup effort is not because of the change in season, but to prepare for the eight days of Passover. Khalili, 19, will rid his home of food products with flour, grains and yeast. "It's very hard, especially for a college student," said Khalili, a UC Irvine student.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT BEACH -- Rabbi Reuben Mintz spent Wednesday morning delivering a Seder meal to senior citizens in rest homes. He hoped to include them in what is perhaps the most significant holiday of the Jewish religion, he said. By sundown, when Passover really began, Mintz was back at his Corona del Mar home preparing the tables for the first Seder meal of the holiday. Another Seder meal is scheduled for this evening. Mintz, wearing a yarmulke with a matzo bread print, described the holy meal.
NEWS
April 23, 2005
Andrew Edwards Passover begins today at sundown, celebrating the world's Jewish people for the 3,317th consecutive year. It is the oldest holiday observed in any Western religion, said Rabbi Mark S. Miller of Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach. Passover is the remembrance of the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, as told in the Torah. The story includes the account of God sparing the Israelites from the plagues inflicted upon Egypt, and the communicating of the Ten Commandments to Moses.
NEWS
April 18, 2000
o7 We asked preschoolers what they learned about Passover after taking part in a five-stage recreation activity at Newport Beach's Temple Bat Yahmf7 . "Well, it's a good thing we weren't really building pyramids because we had the meanest time of our lives." REX COHEN, 5 "The frogs jumped on King Pharaoh because he was mean to the Jews." PAIGE MASONEK, 4 "We sing a frog song because it's Passover and that's what our teacher tells us to do sometimes.
NEWS
April 8, 2001
Saturday marked the beginning of Passover, the preeminent holiday of the Jewish faith. Passover is commemorated with a celebration called a Seder. These celebrations are laden with symbolic foods and prayers. Matzo is the main food. It's an unleavened bread that symbolizes both the Jews hasty exit from Egyptian slavery and humility. Parsley, salt water, a bone of a lamb, a roasted egg, five glasses of wine, one for the prophet Elijah, ancient prayers and songs are all part of a Passover Seder.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | March 29, 2013
Q: My wife and I had a discussion last night concerning the different time periods we actually celebrate Easter. Sometimes, Easter is in mid-April, and sometimes in early March. We celebrate the birth of Christ on Dec. 25 every year, yet there's no definitive date to celebrate His death and resurrection. Is this because history has never been able to pinpoint exact dates for these important events in our religious and faith history? I think most Christians would prefer to celebrate both events on specific dates.
NEWS
April 9, 2001
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA - It is one of our oldest celebrations. For 3,313 years, Jews have continuously observed the feast of Passover. The eight-day observance commemorates the freedom and exodus of the Jewish slaves from Egypt during the reign of Pharaoh Ramses II. "Passover, we celebrate the historical freedom of Jewish people from Egyptian bondage," said Rabbi Reuven Mintz of Chabad in Newport Beach. "That concept actually manifests itself every year with the hope of true peace for all mankind -- freedom from oppression, war and bloodshed with the vision of a perfect world, a world of no war and famine."
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | March 22, 2013
Thank you, dear readers, for your many kind comments on my column welcoming Pope Francis to the world of healing and hope. I'm truly excited to see his first humble and gracious acts, and I hope they presage a time of new beginnings and old continuities for the Catholic Church. I was particularly pleased to learn that one of the things he did was write a warm and welcoming letter to the rabbi of Rome pledging his commitment to continue the work of improving Catholic-Jewish relations.
NEWS
By Kelly Strodl | April 13, 2006
Passover, the eight-day remembrance of the Jewish exodus from slavery in Egypt, is generally observed among family, but local temples also offer community services. Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach will hold a Seder tonight, offering the elaborate ceremonial meal between services. "The celebration is generally home-oriented rather than synagogue-oriented," said Bill Shane, executive director for the temple. "However, we are having a celebration at the synagogue for those who don't have a place to go."
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | April 11, 2014
Passover will be celebrated this year beginning on Monday evening, April 14, with the first Seder — the Passover meal. Easter Sunday this year falls on April 20 for all Christian denominations, and although this single Christian date for Easter will not come again until 2017, it's clear that Passover and Easter are meant to be closely connected in our calendars of sacred time. This is because all the synoptic gospel accounts state that the Last Supper was either a Passover Seder meal (Matthew 26:17)
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NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | March 29, 2013
Q: My wife and I had a discussion last night concerning the different time periods we actually celebrate Easter. Sometimes, Easter is in mid-April, and sometimes in early March. We celebrate the birth of Christ on Dec. 25 every year, yet there's no definitive date to celebrate His death and resurrection. Is this because history has never been able to pinpoint exact dates for these important events in our religious and faith history? I think most Christians would prefer to celebrate both events on specific dates.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | March 22, 2013
Thank you, dear readers, for your many kind comments on my column welcoming Pope Francis to the world of healing and hope. I'm truly excited to see his first humble and gracious acts, and I hope they presage a time of new beginnings and old continuities for the Catholic Church. I was particularly pleased to learn that one of the things he did was write a warm and welcoming letter to the rabbi of Rome pledging his commitment to continue the work of improving Catholic-Jewish relations.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | April 22, 2011
I love the fact that that Passover and Easter, both being lunar holidays, usually overlap. This seems to me to be a sign from God that we're more the same than we are different. To be sure, the official theologies of Passover and Easter are fundamentally different. The Passover meal is eaten for God, and the Easter meal (the Eucharist) is eaten of God. In Easter, a man becomes God, and in Passover, a man leads an entire people to God at Mount Sinai. In Easter, atonement is made through the sacrificial death and resurrection of Jesus, while in Passover, the ancient biblical sacrifices offered at the Temple in Jerusalem remind us of how we still must sacrifice for our faith and seek atonement from God for our sins.
NEWS
Sheila Witzling, Special to the Daily Pilot | April 8, 2011
Preschoolers at the Merage Jewish Community Center of Orange County in Irvine got ready to celebrate Passover. The Jewish holiday will begin at sundown April 18, and the preschoolers were busy Thursday using rolling pins and learning how to make matzo. Passover commemorates the story of the Exodus, in which the ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. Its name refers to the passage in the Book of Exodus (12:11) when God "passed over" the houses of the Israelites during the 10 t h plague.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | March 31, 2011
Call it a Seder for a sweet tooth. Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach plans two Passover Seders this year, one of which has an unusual main ingredient: chocolate. A "Chocolate Passover Seder," in which the traditional food and drink items are given a chocolate twist, will be hosted by the temple women's group and led by Rabbi Rayna Gevurtz at 7 p.m. April 7 in the main social hall. "This is just a way to have some fun before the seriousness of the Passover festival," said Gevurtz.
NEWS
By Alan Blank | April 6, 2009
Two schools of thought inform this year’s Passover celebrations at Newport Beach synagogues. The typical Jewish congregation celebrates the liberation of the Jews from slavery in Egypt at home with a traditional meal called the Seder and a communal reading of the Haggada, a book that tells the story of the Exodus. That’s what most of the members of Temple Bat Yahm will be doing, including Executive Director Bill Shane, who plans to have 25 to 30 people come to his house for dinner and take turns reading the story of the 10 plagues and Moses’ parting of the Red Sea to escape Pharaoh’s armies.
FEATURES
By MARC RUBENSTEIN | April 3, 2009
Passover is a holiday to be celebrated by everyone because of it?s meaning ? freedom. For Jew and non-Jew alike, this year why not try something different and attend a Passover Seder that has never been done before. When we are children the miracle of Passover seems very magical. I have found a magician who will re-create the 10 plagues and make the prophet Elijah appear. Of all my years as a rabbi this is probably going to be the most inspirational event that I have been a part of. You don?
LOCAL
By Carolyn Price | March 30, 2009
Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach will  host A Passover Sedar/dinner and telling the story of Passover  through an inspiring performance of magic, illusion, and escape.  The Ten Plagues will magically be recreated through the eyes of a modern day magician Curtis Lovell II on April 8, 2009.   The 35-year-old synagogue, Temple Isaiah,  founded  by holocaust survivors, Felix and Flory VanBeek, will continue thousands of years of tradition with their Seder dinner and ceremony.
FEATURES
By Michael Miller | April 19, 2008
The Passover Seder, a ritual yearly meal that commemorates the exodus of the Jews from Egypt, is meant to honor the past. But Rabbi Reuven Mintz of the Chabad Jewish Center in Newport Beach also sees it as an opportunity to plan for the future — and to put the present in context. Foods on traditional Seder plates symbolize aspects of the exodus story, including bitter herbs for the hardships of slavery and charoset, a fruit and nut mixture, for the mortar the slaves used to build the storehouses of Egypt.
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