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By Jim Carnett | August 12, 2013
I sometimes need to be reminded to be grateful for things I take for granted. Like walking. I have a good friend, several years older than I, who's battling an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease. An avid walker for many years, he daily employed that exercise in an attempt to stanch Parkinson's creeping advance. But over the past six months, he has almost completely lost his ability to walk. His stiff legs freeze. When that occurs, he's virtually incapable of taking a step.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | March 31, 2014
April is national Parkinson's Awareness Month. I know a bit about Parkinson's disease; we've lived together for 17 years. My father had it for nine years. I received my own diagnosis eight years ago, just before he died. I have an uncle who's exhibiting early symptoms. Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder with no known cure. It causes nerve cells to die or become impaired, and patients exhibit such symptoms as tremors or shaking, slowness of movement, rigidity or stiffness, loss of facial mobility, and balance difficulties.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | September 9, 2013
My heart goes out to one of my all-time favorite singers, Linda Ronstadt. I'm a bigger fan of hers today than ever. A superstar pop artist of the 1970s, her smash hits include "You're No Good" and "When Will I Be Loved. " She later segued into such diverse musical genres as country and mariachi. Ronstadt recently announced publicly that she has Parkinson's disease. So do I. She was diagnosed eight months ago and claims that she's no longer able to sing a note. Neither can I. Of course, to be truthful, I've never been able to carry a tune.
NEWS
By Carrie Luger Slayback | December 18, 2013
Over the phone to New York City, I ask my sister, "How's swim team?" "I went this morning," she answers, "and a substitute coach complimented me on my arm turnover. Really made me feel good. " Hiding the sudden lump in my throat, I say, "You're nuts. What's the temperature there?" My baby sis, 10 years my junior, is on a competitive swim team whose members ride the subway at 5 a.m. on icy mornings to work out in barely heated pools. After years of successful meets, including a relay around Manhattan, her troublesome slowing became a diagnosis: Parkinson's disease.
SPORTS
By Jim Carnett | January 23, 2012
Several nights ago I dreamed I met heavyweight boxing champ and cultural icon, Muhammad Ali. He turned 70 last week. Though I've been a fan for decades, I confess I've never dreamed of him before. The setting was a surreal, red carpet-like environment, and I was positioned behind a roped-off area with hundreds of other fans. He stood before us, unsmiling, distinguished, regal. He must have been 10 feet tall. Impetuously, I ducked beneath the restraining rope and sprinted over to where he was, catching the security guard's unawares.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | June 10, 2013
We eight sat around a table last week on the shores of a lovely lake enjoying a picnic lunch. It was a gorgeous Southern California afternoon - blue skies and fleecy, white clouds - and we relished our much-anticipated "hang" time together. Four couples made up our little assembly, four men and four women. Not coincidentally, four of us battle the effects of the same physical malady, Parkinson's disease. Take a wild guess as to how many men and women in our lively company have Parkinson's.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | December 5, 2011
Last week's column on Parkinson's disease elicited some unexpected responses ("Fighting a daily battle," Nov. 29) . In the column, I described my six-year battle with the disease. Two gents whom I went to school with in Costa Mesa — and haven't heard from in decades — independently contacted me. They both suffer from the disease as well. That brings to four the number of fellows I attended Lindbergh School, Everett A. Rea Junior High and Costa Mesa High schools with who have Parkinson's.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | July 30, 2012
Have you ever flown a commercial airline that offers open seating? You print your ticket early so you can get into boarding group A. You board with the first passengers and pick a window seat near the front. Life is sweet. Moments later, a gentleman takes the aisle seat in your row. It's all good! Now comes the nervous part. For the next 10 minutes you hope against hope that your row's center seat will remain open. That possibility becomes dicey as the plane fills up. Finally, you reconcile yourself to the fact that you'll likely acquire a seatmate.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | October 15, 2012
My friend and I are more than pals. We've become, well, brothers. It's no different than what I experienced decades ago when I served in the U.S. military and had a number of Army "brothers. " They were my closest buddies. I would have willingly given my life for them, and they — astonishingly — would have done the same for me. That's not unusual. It's been that way with armies for centuries. Soldiers sharing foxholes fight not just for themselves but for the guys to their left and right.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | January 20, 2011
Editor's note: This corrects the caption on the photo of Allison Smith-Conway. The Foundation for Neurosciences Stroke and Recovery is not affiliated with Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian. NEWPORT BEACH — Total well-being requires a balance between body and mind, but Parkinson's patients undergoing surgery and treatment often struggle to find that harmony, a therapeutic fitness coach said this week. "Every one of the doctors have a specialty and they're incredibly good at that specialty," said Allison Smith-Conway, executive director of movement disorders for the Foundation for Neurosciences Stroke and Recovery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | March 31, 2014
April is national Parkinson's Awareness Month. I know a bit about Parkinson's disease; we've lived together for 17 years. My father had it for nine years. I received my own diagnosis eight years ago, just before he died. I have an uncle who's exhibiting early symptoms. Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder with no known cure. It causes nerve cells to die or become impaired, and patients exhibit such symptoms as tremors or shaking, slowness of movement, rigidity or stiffness, loss of facial mobility, and balance difficulties.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014
Ruth Mae (Heinlein) Stockstill of Mission Viejo passed away on March 4, 2014 with her granddaughter Catherine and her son Raymond by her side. Ruth was born in Cincinnati on January 22, 1925. She attended Ohio State University where she met her husband Dr. Raymond Stockstill. They were married in the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority house on July 20th, 1946 and settled in the greater Cleveland area. Ruth was a strong modern woman. She raised 2 children, was a fashion model, worked as a buyer for a department store, founded a ceramic business and founded a home building company on Hilton Head Island before retiring in 1994 because of Parkinson's Disease.
NEWS
February 15, 2014
A UC Irvine doctor is looking for volunteers to participate in a clinical trial of a drug meant to fight some affects of in Parkinson's disease. Dr. Neal Hermanowicz needs volunteers from the Irvine area who would help test the affects of rasagiline tablets on mild cognitive impairment that can come from Parkinson's, according to a news release. Participants in the trials need to meet specific requirements including being between the age of 45 and 80. The study is recruiting participants through March.
NEWS
By Carrie Luger Slayback | December 18, 2013
Over the phone to New York City, I ask my sister, "How's swim team?" "I went this morning," she answers, "and a substitute coach complimented me on my arm turnover. Really made me feel good. " Hiding the sudden lump in my throat, I say, "You're nuts. What's the temperature there?" My baby sis, 10 years my junior, is on a competitive swim team whose members ride the subway at 5 a.m. on icy mornings to work out in barely heated pools. After years of successful meets, including a relay around Manhattan, her troublesome slowing became a diagnosis: Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | November 11, 2013
I've noticed lately that my 8-month-old grandson has been acquiring a lode of new physical skills. Those skills, enhanced and refined daily, surprise and delight his fawning family. The funny thing is his new skills seem to mirror those that I've recently been shedding. It's almost as if some immutable cosmic force is at work ensuring equilibrium. Judah gains 'em, I lose 'em. Perhaps not. More likely it's an eerie twist of fate - and also the fact that I have Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | September 9, 2013
My heart goes out to one of my all-time favorite singers, Linda Ronstadt. I'm a bigger fan of hers today than ever. A superstar pop artist of the 1970s, her smash hits include "You're No Good" and "When Will I Be Loved. " She later segued into such diverse musical genres as country and mariachi. Ronstadt recently announced publicly that she has Parkinson's disease. So do I. She was diagnosed eight months ago and claims that she's no longer able to sing a note. Neither can I. Of course, to be truthful, I've never been able to carry a tune.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | August 12, 2013
I sometimes need to be reminded to be grateful for things I take for granted. Like walking. I have a good friend, several years older than I, who's battling an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease. An avid walker for many years, he daily employed that exercise in an attempt to stanch Parkinson's creeping advance. But over the past six months, he has almost completely lost his ability to walk. His stiff legs freeze. When that occurs, he's virtually incapable of taking a step.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | June 10, 2013
We eight sat around a table last week on the shores of a lovely lake enjoying a picnic lunch. It was a gorgeous Southern California afternoon - blue skies and fleecy, white clouds - and we relished our much-anticipated "hang" time together. Four couples made up our little assembly, four men and four women. Not coincidentally, four of us battle the effects of the same physical malady, Parkinson's disease. Take a wild guess as to how many men and women in our lively company have Parkinson's.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | March 11, 2013
I was led quite by accident last week to peruse a pair of highly absorbing memoirs. That's the nice thing about being retired. You have time to indulge your reading passions, from selections on the latest bestseller lists to enduring works you've long wanted to dust off. Last week's two memoirs were written by authentic American heroes who've lost successful careers to unfortunate circumstances. My first read was retired four-star Gen. Stanley McChrystal's weighty tome, "My Share of the Task.
NEWS
By Jim Carnett | January 21, 2013
I first saw him one Sunday morning as I exited church. A man in his early 50s, he was carrying boxes to an information table at the back of the church. His hands were trembling in a way that was familiar to me. My heart went out to him. "Look," I whispered to my wife, Hedy. "That fellow has Parkinson's. " I know something about the disease. My dad had it. I have it. Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder with no known cure. It causes nerve cells to die or become impaired, and patients exhibit such symptoms as tremors or shaking, slowness of movement, rigidity or stiffness, and balance difficulties.
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