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NEWS
By James P. Gray | October 13, 2009
Recently I was shocked to hear of an area in the Pacific Ocean somewhat north of a line between San Francisco and Hawaii that is simply a heap of trash twice the size of Texas! Just as things tend to drift toward the drain in your bathtub when the water is being emptied, this trash has gravitated to this area for decades because of prevailing wind and current conditions. Could this be true? On occasion, there are stories that are too wild to believe. Maybe this one fits that category, or maybe it doesn’t.
NEWS
December 19, 2013
Orange County Museum of Art officials have appointed chief curator Dan Cameron as the museum's interim director and CEO while the search continues for a new full-time leader. Cameron will take the post Jan. 1, replacing outgoing director Dennis Szakacs, who announced in September that he will step down at the end of the year. "As we near the end of Dennis' tenure at the museum and thank him for his many contributions and exceptional leadership, we are grateful that Dan has agreed to step into the director's position and maintain the momentum that OCMA has gained in recent years," museum president Craig Wells said in a news release Thursday.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | March 10, 2010
Turtles often mistake floating plastic bags in the ocean for jellyfish, and they eat them in their entirety. Sea birds think those tiny blue beads of pre-manufactured plastic are actually fish eggs, and they swallow them whole. Their digestive systems can’t take it, and the creatures end up starving to death. The end result is dead fish and more dead sea birds as plastic pollution in the Pacific Ocean mounts. As many as 1 million sea birds die each year and up to 100,000 sea turtles die from the consumption of plastic, that inanimate object that has frustrated environmentalists for decades.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | April 7, 2010
Students marveled at electric cars on the lawn outside the Robert B. Moore Theatre on Wednesday after listening to a two-hour lecture on the dangers of the amount of plastic amassing in the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed “Green Coast Day,” Charles Moore, a Long Beach ship captain, talked to 300 students inside the theater, explaining how the Pacific has become a depository for millions of tons of plastic due to the prevailing clockwise atmospheric currents that continually swirl around trash with no end in sight.
NEWS
March 31, 2002
On Monday, the story goes, a group of Costa Mesa residents are going to suggest to the City Council that the name of the city be changed. Costa Mesa-by-the-sea seems to be floating near the top of the list because, after all, Costa Mesa floats near by the Pacific Ocean, we guess. Though we've yet to cover any surfing contests in Costa Mesa. So, yeah, back to the name game. There's the Costa part of the city's name, which translates nicely into "coast" in English.
NEWS
February 21, 2008
The Surfrider Foundation’s Newport Beach Chapter will hold its first RockWater Run March 28 to raise awareness of pollution in the Santa Ana Watershed. The organization hopes to make it an annual event. At midnight, runners will depart from the mountains of Big Bear, descending 100 miles alongside the snowmelt as it travels through the Santa Ana River and into the ocean. The run is divided into four 25-mile legs, each run by a different team of runners who will alternate mileage to cover the distance.
NEWS
January 15, 2008
Sign ups are now available for the inaugural RockWater run from Big Bear Lake to Newport Beach. A brainchild of the Surfrider Foundation Newport Beach Chapter, the race kicks off at midnight following the spring equinox on March 21 and follows the entire distance of the Santa Ana Watershed along its course from the mountains to the sands of Orange County. The 100-mile relay lets runners choose a distance that is comfortable for them and allows substitutions at any point along the course, organizers said.
FEATURES
By Candice Baker | June 14, 2008
Some doomsday prophesiers maintain that Southern California is destined to break off from the mainland during the “Big One,” the future earthquake expected to decimate the state. But half a millennium ago, cartographers thought California was, in fact, an island. An exhibit showing examples of the peculiar geographical error is on view at the Sherman Library & Gardens in Corona del Mar. The show was the idea of library Director William Hendricks. “He’s always been fascinated with that topic,” librarian Jill Thrasher said.
SPORTS
By JOHN REGER | March 31, 2008
Though the Ocean South Course at Pelican Hill Golf Club was closer to the water, I always thought the Ocean North Course was a better layout. The South had two holes on the water, and though they provided spectacular views, they were nothing outstanding as far as golf hole design. Golf course designer, Tom Fazio, who created the courses in the early 90s, designed the back-to-back par threes on purpose to give the golfer two holes on the Pacific Ocean. The No. 12 is 159 yards from the back tees and the No. 13 hole is 131 yards, though two greens are utilized on that hole to give it a little more characteristic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 2013
Orange County Museum of Art officials have appointed chief curator Dan Cameron as the museum's interim director and CEO while the search continues for a new full-time leader. Cameron will take the post Jan. 1, replacing outgoing director Dennis Szakacs, who announced in September that he will step down at the end of the year. "As we near the end of Dennis' tenure at the museum and thank him for his many contributions and exceptional leadership, we are grateful that Dan has agreed to step into the director's position and maintain the momentum that OCMA has gained in recent years," museum president Craig Wells said in a news release Thursday.
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NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 29, 2013
By the time you enter the doors of the Orange County Museum of Art and look for the first work of art on display, you'll probably have stepped on it already. The Newport Beach museum's inaugural "2013 California-Pacific Triennial" exhibit, which opens Sunday, begins with an incongruous speed bump that stretches from the tree in front to a strip of lawn near the door. The speed bump is actually an installation by Chilean sculptor Sebastian Preece, who contributed other municipal-themed touches around the grounds.
NEWS
By B.W. Cook | September 15, 2010
Ocean conservation should not be a matter of partisan division. Unfortunately, to a greater rather than lesser degree, it is. The Democrats line up on the side of government-sponsored global protectionism, the Republicans favoring Laissez-Faire capitalism and non-interference from government regulation of private business. Despite the philosophical chasm, there has been a meeting of divergent minds, specifically in American politics, on issues vital to oceanic welfare. Friday night in Laguna Beach, citizens whose political fortunes land on both sides of the aisle came together to raise $1 million for an organization called Oceana.
NEWS
By Joanna Clay, joanna.clay@latimes.com | August 21, 2010
NEWPORT BEACH — It's a common assumption in Newport Beach that kids grow up with a connection to the ocean. However, many children live a 15-minute drive from the water's edge but have rarely, or never, dipped their feet in the Pacific. That's where "Day at the Bay" comes in. On Friday, 23 Santa Ana students, ages 14 to 19, from the Nicholas Academic centers spent their day at the bay. UC Irvine hosted the day, which began with a quick Back Bay lesson at the science center, then the teens took kayaks out on the water.
NEWS
April 10, 2010
What is your plastic footprint? That question was posed by Charles Moore, a noted environmentalist who spoke recently at Orange Coast College about the tons of plastic trash floating and harming life in the Pacific Ocean. Moore, an avid boater, has been crusading against the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. It’s scary stuff. Plastic in the water is harming marine life that mistakenly feeds on debris, or uses it as shelter, disrupting the food chain. Dead albatrosses, fish and mammals are being found with plastic caps, bags, wrappers and other byproducts of consumerism inside their carcasses.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | April 7, 2010
Students marveled at electric cars on the lawn outside the Robert B. Moore Theatre on Wednesday after listening to a two-hour lecture on the dangers of the amount of plastic amassing in the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed “Green Coast Day,” Charles Moore, a Long Beach ship captain, talked to 300 students inside the theater, explaining how the Pacific has become a depository for millions of tons of plastic due to the prevailing clockwise atmospheric currents that continually swirl around trash with no end in sight.
NEWS
By Tom Ragan | March 11, 2010
Turtles often mistake floating plastic bags in the ocean for jellyfish, and they eat them in their entirety. Sea birds think those tiny blue beads of pre-manufactured plastic are actually fish eggs, and they swallow them whole. Their digestive systems can’t take it, and the creatures end up starving to death. The end result is dead fish and more dead sea birds as plastic pollution in the Pacific Ocean mounts. As many as 1 million sea birds die each year and up to 100,000 sea turtles die from the consumption of plastic, that inanimate object that has frustrated environmentalists for decades.
NEWS
By Aggie Demetrescu | February 17, 2010
I look at you, Catalina, every day. I am lucky to have the advantage of seeing you float on the Pacific Ocean right in front of me. I have an unobstructed view of you. You are like a secretive woman. Some days you disappear behind the clouds or the fog. It appears as if the ocean has swallowed you. At times you spread a thin veil over yourself, where I can only see your outline. Then the veil lifts and you are exposing yourself in such clarity that I feel that, if I extended my hand, I could touch you. At such a time, I can see the rock formation on one end of you, and the beige-brown color of the rocks.
NEWS
By James P. Gray | October 13, 2009
Recently I was shocked to hear of an area in the Pacific Ocean somewhat north of a line between San Francisco and Hawaii that is simply a heap of trash twice the size of Texas! Just as things tend to drift toward the drain in your bathtub when the water is being emptied, this trash has gravitated to this area for decades because of prevailing wind and current conditions. Could this be true? On occasion, there are stories that are too wild to believe. Maybe this one fits that category, or maybe it doesn’t.
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