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Outsourcing

NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | July 28, 2011
COSTA MESA - The city could save more than $600,000 a year by contracting with an international security firm to run its jail, according to a city staff report. G4S Secure Solutions was one of two organizations that responded to Costa Mesa's request for bids to staff and operate the city jail. Newport Beach also submitted a bid, but it only offered to house Costa Mesa's inmates at the Newport jail. G4S's bid suggested that it run the city jail for $364,640 annually - a fraction of the $1.3 million in annual costs the Costa Mesa Police Department personnel needs to operate it. However, the company would likely need twice as many people working in the jail than what the city had originally requested, so it would likely cost about $614,000, according to the staff report for Tuesday's City Council meeting.
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NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | March 16, 2011
COSTA MESA — About 213 Costa Mesa employees — nearly half of the city's workforce — can expect layoff notices on Thursday, officials said. More than 90 firefighters, 50 city maintenance workers, 30 dispatchers and a dozen city jail staff are among those being notified that their jobs will be outsourced in six months. "Basically, the morale is in an all-time bottom," said Helen Nenedal, president of the Costa Mesa City Employees Assn., which will bear the brunt of cuts.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | July 5, 2011
SANTA ANA — Costa Mesa cannot lay off city employees by outsourcing their jobs to private companies until the city goes through proper legal steps, an Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that layoffs could not be reinstated until a civil trial when they can be reinstated if an agreement is reached in earlier court proceedings. In a preliminary injunction barring the city from implementing its outsourcing plans, Judge Tam Nomoto Schumann demanded that Costa Mesa follow necessary steps if it plans to replace 213 employees with mostly private workers.
NEWS
By Jennifer Muir | September 8, 2011
The hypocrisy that has become the hallmark of the Costa Mesa City Council majority was reinforced repeatedly at Tuesday's council meeting. While continuing to cry poor about the city's financial condition, the majority voted to authorize unlimited spending for two high-priced law firms in furtherance of its failed outsourcing scheme. Jones Day, the third firm retained to defend the city against a lawsuit filed by city employees, will charge $495 per hour while HansonBridgett from San Francisco will charge $295 to $325 per hour to advise the city's outsourcing agenda.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Harlan | June 30, 2012
In Poor Richard's Almanack, Benjamin Franklin popularized the idiom we love to quote but have a difficult time applying to our daily lives: Haste makes waste. As children, we frequently heard this admonition from parents and teachers. Take your time, do it right the first time. With math teachers, in particular, it was often followed by another directive: Show your work. But we are busy people, and it's rare to focus on one task at a time. One of my friends lamented recently that, with a full schedule of work, tending to three children and trying to keep her home livable (let alone clean)
NEWS
By Lauren Williams | April 27, 2012
Costa Mesa spent nearly $700,000 in legal fees through the end of January to defend itself from a lawsuit filed by its employees, invoices show. Total fees have reached $692,379, according to invoices obtained this week by a Daily Pilot public records request. That figure is $186,000 higher than the $505,399 reported on the city's website earlier this week. Such a disparity online was a mistake, however, as the total did not account for the months of July, August or January, according to city Assistant Finance Director Colleen O'Donoghue.
NEWS
By Jennifer Muir | October 22, 2011
In March, when the City Council majority decided to send layoff notices to nearly half the workforce, they told the public that they had no choice and that the city was on the brink of insolvency. The councilmen's budget projections changed depending on the point they wanted to make each day. So the Costa Mesa City Employees Assn. agreed to hire Harvey M. Rose and Associates, one of the state's most reputable public accountancy firms, to give the public a clear and reliable picture of the city's financial position.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | March 7, 2012
Costa Mesa residents will vote June 5 on whether to adopt a city charter, a proposal that has yielded mixed responses. "We've got to get the tools here to get ourselves back on track, and that's all this charter does," Mayor Pro Tem Jim Righeimer said after the vote Tuesday night. "I'm doing what I truly believe is best for the citizens of Costa Mesa. " Supporters say a charter would provide more local control over governance, while detractors view it as an effort to stop a lawsuit filed by city workers who want to prevent outsourcing of their jobs.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | March 25, 2011
In my long career as a journalist — much of it spent as a business reporter — I covered many stories involving job losses. These stories inevitably contained lots of figures: the number of employees cut, percentage of workforce terminated, expected savings from payroll reductions. The requisite press releases were always filled with euphemisms. Workers weren't fired; they were laid off. Companies didn't shrink; they downsized. Cutbacks were never the result of mistakes made; they were a response to competitive pressures.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
Because of the monopoly they have on providing services to residents, most municipal governments provide those services at too great a cost. If municipal governments had competition, free market forces would determine the cost of those services. That usually means they can be provided at a lower cost. At Tuesday's Costa Mesa City Council meeting, it looks like the process of bringing competition into the picture will begin as the council is expected to give the required six-month notice to employees whose jobs may be outsourced.
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