Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Daily Pilot HomeCollectionsOrange County Sanitation District
IN THE NEWS

Orange County Sanitation District

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 2000
-- Alex Coolman Orange County's project to divert urban runoff to waste water treatment plants officially began Wednesday. The $276,000 program, which includes a diversion berm in the Santa Ana River near Talbert Avenue in Costa Mesa, will see about 2.5 million gallons of runoff per day shunted to the treatment facilities of the Orange County Sanitation District. Without the program, that runoff would flow daily into the ocean. The program will be used throughout the summer.
NEWS
June 15, 2001
The Orange County Sanitation District has scheduled another round of testing of the ocean waters off Newport Beach. The district has scheduled three days of testing, beginning Tuesday, to measure bacteria levels off city beaches. Huntington Beach will also be included in the testing. The testing is the second of six scheduled rounds, which will last until the end of August. The district has budgeted $4.1 million to collect samples from waters near the shoreline and four miles out to sea. The district hopes to determine if its own "outflow" sewer pipe on the ocean floor is causing increased bacteria levels off shore.
NEWS
December 31, 2003
Alicia Robinson The Orange County Sanitation District will begin construction in mid-January on two projects costing more than $2 million to update sewer operations on the city's northeast side. The project includes abandoning two sewer lines on Watson Avenue between Loren Lane and Dublin Street, construction of a new line to serve some residents in that area and replacement of a line on Gisler Avenue. The work will cost $2,375,000 and should take nine months, sanitation district project engineer Larry Rein said.
NEWS
September 9, 2000
Alex Coolman NEWPORT BEACH -- The Orange County Sanitation District is considering a proposal to take in more urban runoff water, a move that may provide a boost for local pollution-control and beach and bay cleaning efforts. The sanitation district, the agency that handles sewage flow for the county and cities like Newport Beach and Huntington Beach, already accepts into its treatment plants about 2 million gallons per day of diverted urban runoff.
FEATURES
May 4, 2006
Last weekend was a painful ? although thankfully not harmful ? reminder of just how quickly our beautiful beaches can be filled with yellow warnings signs that read "Keep out." For two days, the water from Newport Pier to Beach Boulevard in Huntington Beach was closed while the Orange County Sanitation District repaired an offshore sewerage pipe. The work meant that sewage had to be diverted to a pipe that is much closer to shore, and when the work took longer than expected, the Orange County Health Care Agency closed the water as a precautionary move.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT-MESA -- Orange County has begun a three-month diversion program in the Santa Ana River to keep bacteria levels down in the waters of Newport Beach. The county's Public Facilities and Resources Department installed two large sand berms last week to keep urban runoff -- automobile oils, animal waste and grime that washes off city streets -- out of the ocean. The county will divert the waste water from the Santa Ana River to the Orange County Sanitation District's treatment plant in Fountain Valley until Labor Day. The county implemented a similar diversion program last summer.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Paul Clinton CORONA DEL MAR -- The testing boats fanned out on the sea again Wednesday as county sanitation officials continued efforts to determine the cause of the high bacteria levels in area water. Five boats left Newport Harbor for three-hour sessions, returning to their docks about noon. In addition, a Jeep headed south from the Santa Ana River to the Newport Pier to collect samples at the shoreline. The survey was the second round of testing in a six-part effort taking place during the summer months.
NEWS
September 20, 2001
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- The City Council next week is expected to jump aboard a growing movement to insist water pumped off its shores be treated and cleaned more completely than it is now. But the $400-million price tag to better treat the water may be more than taxpayers throughout the county are willing to pay. The City Council on Tuesday is poised to take a stand against the Orange County Sanitation District's...
NEWS
January 26, 2002
Paul Clinton As another way to solve the nagging problem of urban runoff, the Orange County Sanitation District is proposing to divert it for treatment just like sewage. District leaders have launched an effort to amend the agency's charter so it could accept polluted water flowing down the watershed into tributaries that lead to the ocean. Instead, it would be pumped through the district's Fountain Valley plant along with the 241 million gallons of sewage treated each day. "It is one of many things that has to happen," District spokeswoman Lisa Murphy said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2009
Friends and family of the late environmentalist Jan Vandersloot remembered him at a memorial service on Sunday as the guy camped out in beach chair collecting signatures in front of the Sav-On Pharmacy, a tireless champion of Orange County’s wetlands and wildlife. “He leaves behind a legacy of leadership and inspiration, along with hundreds of square miles of wetlands he helped preserve,” said Paul Arms, a member of the California League of Conservation Voters.
Advertisement
FEATURES
May 4, 2006
Last weekend was a painful ? although thankfully not harmful ? reminder of just how quickly our beautiful beaches can be filled with yellow warnings signs that read "Keep out." For two days, the water from Newport Pier to Beach Boulevard in Huntington Beach was closed while the Orange County Sanitation District repaired an offshore sewerage pipe. The work meant that sewage had to be diverted to a pipe that is much closer to shore, and when the work took longer than expected, the Orange County Health Care Agency closed the water as a precautionary move.
NEWS
By By Dave Brooks | October 29, 2005
Ocean conference speech stresses that outdoor resources stakeholders must debate in accord. Environmentalists need to move away from traditional activist functions and more openly engage traditional adversaries like big business and private industry, Orange County Supervisor Tom Wilson said this week in an address at the Headwaters to Ocean Conference in Huntington Beach. Community leaders should facilitate the process, he said, encouraging all stakeholders to sit at the table and reach a compromise before environmental debates degrade into mudslinging battles.
NEWS
December 31, 2003
Alicia Robinson The Orange County Sanitation District will begin construction in mid-January on two projects costing more than $2 million to update sewer operations on the city's northeast side. The project includes abandoning two sewer lines on Watson Avenue between Loren Lane and Dublin Street, construction of a new line to serve some residents in that area and replacement of a line on Gisler Avenue. The work will cost $2,375,000 and should take nine months, sanitation district project engineer Larry Rein said.
NEWS
July 12, 2002
Paul Clinton NEWPORT-MESA -- By saying he opposes a controversial sewage waiver, Supervisor Jim Silva has put the Orange County Sanitation District board within one vote of quashing that agency's bid to extend the permit. Silva, who represents Newport Beach, Costa Mesa and Huntington Beach, becomes the 12th member of the board to support dropping the waiver and requiring the district to step up treatment of its sewage. Right now, the district releases 243 million gallons per day of partially treated sewage from an outfall pipe on the ocean floor.
NEWS
January 26, 2002
Paul Clinton As another way to solve the nagging problem of urban runoff, the Orange County Sanitation District is proposing to divert it for treatment just like sewage. District leaders have launched an effort to amend the agency's charter so it could accept polluted water flowing down the watershed into tributaries that lead to the ocean. Instead, it would be pumped through the district's Fountain Valley plant along with the 241 million gallons of sewage treated each day. "It is one of many things that has to happen," District spokeswoman Lisa Murphy said.
NEWS
September 20, 2001
June Casagrande NEWPORT BEACH -- The City Council next week is expected to jump aboard a growing movement to insist water pumped off its shores be treated and cleaned more completely than it is now. But the $400-million price tag to better treat the water may be more than taxpayers throughout the county are willing to pay. The City Council on Tuesday is poised to take a stand against the Orange County Sanitation District's...
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Paul Clinton CORONA DEL MAR -- The testing boats fanned out on the sea again Wednesday as county sanitation officials continued efforts to determine the cause of the high bacteria levels in area water. Five boats left Newport Harbor for three-hour sessions, returning to their docks about noon. In addition, a Jeep headed south from the Santa Ana River to the Newport Pier to collect samples at the shoreline. The survey was the second round of testing in a six-part effort taking place during the summer months.
NEWS
June 15, 2001
The Orange County Sanitation District has scheduled another round of testing of the ocean waters off Newport Beach. The district has scheduled three days of testing, beginning Tuesday, to measure bacteria levels off city beaches. Huntington Beach will also be included in the testing. The testing is the second of six scheduled rounds, which will last until the end of August. The district has budgeted $4.1 million to collect samples from waters near the shoreline and four miles out to sea. The district hopes to determine if its own "outflow" sewer pipe on the ocean floor is causing increased bacteria levels off shore.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
Paul Clinton NEWPORT-MESA -- Orange County has begun a three-month diversion program in the Santa Ana River to keep bacteria levels down in the waters of Newport Beach. The county's Public Facilities and Resources Department installed two large sand berms last week to keep urban runoff -- automobile oils, animal waste and grime that washes off city streets -- out of the ocean. The county will divert the waste water from the Santa Ana River to the Orange County Sanitation District's treatment plant in Fountain Valley until Labor Day. The county implemented a similar diversion program last summer.
Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|