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NEWS
By: ROBERT GARDNER | October 9, 2005
You'd think Surf City invented surfing. No way. When Surf City consisted of a few miles of oil wells and a saltwater plunge, there was surfing in Newport Beach. One day in the early 1920s, Duke Kahanamoku, world-famous Hawaiian royalty, Olympic swimming champion and currently a movie star, was driving along the coast and saw a long sandbar that reached out from what is now the main beach at Corona del Mar. He made note of the beautiful surf that built up on that sandbar and when the Corona del Mar bath house was built in 1924, the Duke and some of his more muscular friends -- they had to be muscular to handle those 250-pound mahogany boards -- began surfing at Corona del Mar and leaving their boards at the bath house.
NEWS
November 23, 1999
You'd think Surf City invented surfing. No way. When Surf City consisted of a few miles of oil wells and a saltwater plunge, there was surfing in Newport Beach. One day in the early 1920s, Duke Kahanamoku, world-famous Hawaiian royalty, Olympic swimming champion and currently a movie star, was driving along the coast and saw a long sandbar that reached out from what is now the main beach at Corona del Mar. He made note of the beautiful surf that built up on that sandbar and when the Corona del Mar bath house was built in 1924, the Duke and some of his more muscular friends -- they had to be muscular to handle those 250-pound mahogany boards -- began surfing at Corona del Mar and leaving their boards at the bath house.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
Lolita Harper gets it right about the area of the Westside around Victoria Street and Pacific Avenue being nice (Thinking Allowed, "How the Westside has won -- my heart," Monday). She's also right about the beautiful views from that area of our bluffs. If Harper is interested in why some of us have been asking for the bluffs from about 19th Street down to the Newport Beach border to be rezoned residential, she might want to drive that area and contrast it to the area around Victoria and Pacific that she did drive.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | January 22, 2009
Banning Ranch, one of the last large chunks of undeveloped coastal land in Orange County, could cost $184 million to $211 million, according to a new Newport Beach-commissioned pricing study. The city could get a discount of 25% for buying the land all at once, reducing the price to anywhere from $138 million to $158 million. Local environmentalists say they believe the cost is inflated. “The problem is there’s no comparables; it’s hard to compare Banning Ranch to anything, because there’s nothing like that in the area,” said Chris Bunyan, a member of the Banning Ranch Task Force, a group that wants to preserve the land as open space.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 16, 2008
As many as 18 Newport Beach property owners may be due a small chunk of oil money from city pipelines underneath their homes. The city owns 16 oil wells just north of West Coast Highway off West Newport. The oil is drilled on a slant and piped underneath the feet of 187 property owners in West Newport. City officials drafted an agreement to pay the property owners royalties for the oil in 1982, but the list of who is supposed to get what has not been kept up to date, said City Manager Homer Bludau.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | June 26, 2010
As Gulf Coast residents suffer from their loss of beaches and bays, residents of Newport can enjoy their water and sand for exactly the same reason – oil. For 30 years the city of Newport Beach has been operating its own oil wells on Banning Ranch. All of the revenue from crude and natural gas goes straight to the city's coffers, into a fund for beach and bay maintenance. And it's not a small amount – in 2009 the city sold $1.8 million worth of black gold. That's a serious chunk at a time when the city was facing a $12 million budget deficit.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | June 26, 2009
Costa Mesa resident Terry Welsh spends a lot of time thinking about where the money might come from to buy Banning Ranch, one of the last undeveloped chunks of coastal land in Orange County. Welsh and other volunteers who want to see the land preserved are up against a team of experienced land developers who want to build shops, homes and a hotel on part of the land. “We know we’re not up against fools — we’re up against people who know what they’re doing and get paid for their time, and we’re just volunteers,” Welsh said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | May 2, 2008
Two competing visions of Banning Ranch emerged at a meeting of area residents, environmentalists and developers Thursday night at Newport Beach City Hall. Land developers unveiled revised plans to build homes, a 75-room hotel and shopping areas in Banning Ranch that would leave as much as 70% of the land preserved as open space, but environmentalists want to see all of the roughly 400-acre area preserved in its natural state. Environmentalists claim the area is a pristine chunk of undeveloped coastal land that is home to a vast array of plants and animals.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
In his recent letter to the editor titled, "Good night, El Toro airport fight, sleep tight," writer Martin A. Brower would have us join him on his trip to Fantasyland as he postulates that " the issue of an airport at El Toro should never have come up." The fact that the South County whiners were successful in frightening their fellow residents into believing the myth that a commercial airport would somehow endanger them doesn't change the reality that the location was, and still is, the best location for a major commercial airport in this region.
NEWS
By Dorothy Kraus | July 12, 2013
The community cheered last week at news that excessive and destructive mowing on Banning Ranch did not occur. According to an oil field employee with whom I spoke, the mowing is now limited to a 100-foot buffer around the perimeter of Banning Ranch. This 100-foot buffer is consistent with the Orange County Fire Authority vegetation management code and will ensure adequate safety for the adjacent residences, but will also allow re-establishment of coastal sage scrub habitat on much of the mesa.
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NEWS
By Dorothy Kraus | July 12, 2013
The community cheered last week at news that excessive and destructive mowing on Banning Ranch did not occur. According to an oil field employee with whom I spoke, the mowing is now limited to a 100-foot buffer around the perimeter of Banning Ranch. This 100-foot buffer is consistent with the Orange County Fire Authority vegetation management code and will ensure adequate safety for the adjacent residences, but will also allow re-establishment of coastal sage scrub habitat on much of the mesa.
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NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | June 26, 2010
As Gulf Coast residents suffer from their loss of beaches and bays, residents of Newport can enjoy their water and sand for exactly the same reason – oil. For 30 years the city of Newport Beach has been operating its own oil wells on Banning Ranch. All of the revenue from crude and natural gas goes straight to the city's coffers, into a fund for beach and bay maintenance. And it's not a small amount – in 2009 the city sold $1.8 million worth of black gold. That's a serious chunk at a time when the city was facing a $12 million budget deficit.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | June 26, 2009
Costa Mesa resident Terry Welsh spends a lot of time thinking about where the money might come from to buy Banning Ranch, one of the last undeveloped chunks of coastal land in Orange County. Welsh and other volunteers who want to see the land preserved are up against a team of experienced land developers who want to build shops, homes and a hotel on part of the land. “We know we’re not up against fools — we’re up against people who know what they’re doing and get paid for their time, and we’re just volunteers,” Welsh said.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | January 22, 2009
Banning Ranch, one of the last large chunks of undeveloped coastal land in Orange County, could cost $184 million to $211 million, according to a new Newport Beach-commissioned pricing study. The city could get a discount of 25% for buying the land all at once, reducing the price to anywhere from $138 million to $158 million. Local environmentalists say they believe the cost is inflated. “The problem is there’s no comparables; it’s hard to compare Banning Ranch to anything, because there’s nothing like that in the area,” said Chris Bunyan, a member of the Banning Ranch Task Force, a group that wants to preserve the land as open space.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | October 16, 2008
As many as 18 Newport Beach property owners may be due a small chunk of oil money from city pipelines underneath their homes. The city owns 16 oil wells just north of West Coast Highway off West Newport. The oil is drilled on a slant and piped underneath the feet of 187 property owners in West Newport. City officials drafted an agreement to pay the property owners royalties for the oil in 1982, but the list of who is supposed to get what has not been kept up to date, said City Manager Homer Bludau.
NEWS
By Brianna Bailey | May 2, 2008
Two competing visions of Banning Ranch emerged at a meeting of area residents, environmentalists and developers Thursday night at Newport Beach City Hall. Land developers unveiled revised plans to build homes, a 75-room hotel and shopping areas in Banning Ranch that would leave as much as 70% of the land preserved as open space, but environmentalists want to see all of the roughly 400-acre area preserved in its natural state. Environmentalists claim the area is a pristine chunk of undeveloped coastal land that is home to a vast array of plants and animals.
NEWS
By: ROBERT GARDNER | October 9, 2005
You'd think Surf City invented surfing. No way. When Surf City consisted of a few miles of oil wells and a saltwater plunge, there was surfing in Newport Beach. One day in the early 1920s, Duke Kahanamoku, world-famous Hawaiian royalty, Olympic swimming champion and currently a movie star, was driving along the coast and saw a long sandbar that reached out from what is now the main beach at Corona del Mar. He made note of the beautiful surf that built up on that sandbar and when the Corona del Mar bath house was built in 1924, the Duke and some of his more muscular friends -- they had to be muscular to handle those 250-pound mahogany boards -- began surfing at Corona del Mar and leaving their boards at the bath house.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
In his recent letter to the editor titled, "Good night, El Toro airport fight, sleep tight," writer Martin A. Brower would have us join him on his trip to Fantasyland as he postulates that " the issue of an airport at El Toro should never have come up." The fact that the South County whiners were successful in frightening their fellow residents into believing the myth that a commercial airport would somehow endanger them doesn't change the reality that the location was, and still is, the best location for a major commercial airport in this region.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
Lolita Harper gets it right about the area of the Westside around Victoria Street and Pacific Avenue being nice (Thinking Allowed, "How the Westside has won -- my heart," Monday). She's also right about the beautiful views from that area of our bluffs. If Harper is interested in why some of us have been asking for the bluffs from about 19th Street down to the Newport Beach border to be rezoned residential, she might want to drive that area and contrast it to the area around Victoria and Pacific that she did drive.
NEWS
November 23, 1999
You'd think Surf City invented surfing. No way. When Surf City consisted of a few miles of oil wells and a saltwater plunge, there was surfing in Newport Beach. One day in the early 1920s, Duke Kahanamoku, world-famous Hawaiian royalty, Olympic swimming champion and currently a movie star, was driving along the coast and saw a long sandbar that reached out from what is now the main beach at Corona del Mar. He made note of the beautiful surf that built up on that sandbar and when the Corona del Mar bath house was built in 1924, the Duke and some of his more muscular friends -- they had to be muscular to handle those 250-pound mahogany boards -- began surfing at Corona del Mar and leaving their boards at the bath house.
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