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NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | May 28, 2008
Just how Planned Parenthood arrived at its flunking grade for Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s sex education program remains unclear to local school leaders. Tom Antal, who oversees the health program as part of his duties for the district, said he filled out Planned Parenthood’s survey forms much the same way as many other school districts that got higher scores than Newport-Mesa. “It wasn’t terribly in depth,” Antal said of the organization’s survey.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 24, 2007
Despite a desire to increase home ownership in Costa Mesa, city leaders are considering new limits on the practice of subdividing apartment buildings so units can be sold individually. Changes to Costa Mesa city zoning standards could mean apartment complexes built more than 40 years ago and multi-tenant industrial parks on the Westside can't be subdivided and sold as separate units. Earlier this year, concerns arose that selling older apartments might be sticking first-time buyers with faulty plumbing or other infrastructure, and that allowing Westside industrial parks to be split and sold off would slow down redevelopment in a run-down part of the city.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 30, 2013
Newport-Mesa Unified School District teachers and administrators spoke about the successes and struggles associated with implementing the new Common Core State Standards during a special board meeting Tuesday. The district's teachers have been developing course curriculum in math and English-language arts for K-12 classes for the past two years. This year, the district's pilot year, is preparing them to fully launch Common Core lessons in 2014. Now, teachers at the high school level are beginning to look into designing curriculum to adhere to the Common Core standards in science and social studies.
NEWS
June 6, 2001
Jennifer Kho COSTA MESA -- The El Camino Shopping Center could become homes after all. The City Council rezoned the center for single-family housing in March, but El Camino Partners LLC developer Jeff Pratt said last month that the approval of new residential development standards could kill his plans to convert the center into homes. The proposed standards -- given preliminary approval by the council May 7 -- would have required minimum lot sizes of 4,000 square feet, with an average lot size of 4,500 square feet throughout the development.
NEWS
August 14, 2004
Alicia Robinson Cities in the San Diego Creek and Newport Bay watershed have, for the time being, escaped stricter standards on what can be in the groundwater they discharge into Newport Bay. The Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board decided at a meeting Friday it will give staff members at least until its next meeting in November to discuss alternatives with stakeholders and possibly overhaul the proposed...
NEWS
January 18, 2001
WHAT HAPPENED: The council unanimously voted to impose a 45-day moratorium on new single-family houses and remodels. In June, the council placed a moratorium on multifamily dwellings while city officials considered new residential development standards for them. The Planning Commission approved the standards last week, and the council is scheduled to consider them at a future meeting. WHAT IT MEANS: City staff is now working on new standards for single-family houses.
NEWS
February 19, 2001
Jennifer Kho COSTA MESA -- Responding to concern about new development on the Eastside, the City Council on Tuesday will consider putting in restrictions on construction of two-story homes. And City Councilman Gary Monahan is worried that nobody knows. "My concern is that the city has not done a good job of public notification for these revised standards," he said. "Every homeowner in town is having their ability to redevelop, remodel or expand their home modified, and the homeowners don't know anything about it. The council rants and raves about notification to neighbors when a developer builds near their houses, but here we're going to affect every homeowner in town and no one has been notified."
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 21, 2007
A project to renovate 12 Victoria Street apartments and sell them individually will face a final hurdle tonight, when the Costa Mesa City Council decides whether to allow it. But it may also be a bit of a bellwether indicating how such condo conversion projects will fare in the future. Since April, the city has had a moratorium on subdividing apartment buildings for individual sale of units. In the meantime, the city has been drafting stricter rules for condo conversions that the council will consider next month.
NEWS
July 3, 2000
Danette Goulet NEWPORT-MESA -- In her 30 years of teaching first grade, Marcy Encinas has seen children cry over scraped knees, dead goldfish and because they wanted their mothers. But this is the first year she has seen children burst into tears of frustration over schoolwork. The reason for the despair is clear. This year, teachers throughout California were required to integrate new state-mandated standards in language arts and mathematics into their normal curricula.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | March 29, 2014
It's no secret that significant changes are underway in education. But an easier-to-miss development is that these various paths to change, though often superficially unrelated, are converging on a central principle: Education must increasingly focus on real-world knowledge and skills. This shift from the esoteric to the practical, the ivory tower to the shop floor, is sometimes subtle, in other instances intentionally bold, and it has passionate supporters as well as critics. But in all cases it marks a profound rethinking of the nature and scope of our efforts to prepare students for the future.
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NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 30, 2013
Newport-Mesa Unified School District teachers and administrators spoke about the successes and struggles associated with implementing the new Common Core State Standards during a special board meeting Tuesday. The district's teachers have been developing course curriculum in math and English-language arts for K-12 classes for the past two years. This year, the district's pilot year, is preparing them to fully launch Common Core lessons in 2014. Now, teachers at the high school level are beginning to look into designing curriculum to adhere to the Common Core standards in science and social studies.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | October 26, 2013
An unlikely controversy has erupted in education regarding, of all things, cursive writing. The debate over cursive is reaching full throttle courtesy of the new Common Core State Standards and its top-to-bottom overhaul of K-12 curriculum, which is now beginning to be rolled out in our local schools. Cursive writing, while not expressly prohibited or discouraged, isn't included in the new standards. For now, California has opted to continue requiring cursive instruction, but many observers believe it's just a matter of time before that mandate becomes history.
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 19, 2013
The words "Common Core" don't hold special meaning to students in Terri Clarke's second-grade class at Newport Elementary. Unbeknownst to them, the lessons Clarke is implementing will have a profound effect on the way they are taught for the rest of their time in public schools. Common Core places an emphasis on big-picture, conceptual understanding and collaborative learning with peers, moving away from rote memorization, proponents say. "We're passionate about this curriculum," Clarke said.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | February 16, 2013
Newport-Mesa school officials have begun trying to explain how the Common Core State Standards will be implemented beginning in the next school year. It's no easy job, given that they probably aren't entirely sure themselves what the new standards will look like in practice. Even so, district administrators are practically giddy with enthusiasm over the changes, which they believe will usher in more rigor and relevance to the classroom. In a meeting I attended recently, staff members were visibly excited as they attempted to introduce Common Core concepts to a group of parents.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | June 7, 2008
A majority of Newport-Mesa Unified School District school board members would like to see more sex education taught in schools, but all of the board members are waiting to see new education standards before doing anything, school board officials said. Sex education has been on the school district’s radar following the release of new eduction standards. Also released were the findings of an audit by Planned Parenthood that highlighted the fact Newport-Mesa doesn’t teach comprehensive sex education and rated its program a 59 out of 100, largely based on the district’s health textbook.
NEWS
By Daniel Tedford | May 28, 2008
Just how Planned Parenthood arrived at its flunking grade for Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s sex education program remains unclear to local school leaders. Tom Antal, who oversees the health program as part of his duties for the district, said he filled out Planned Parenthood’s survey forms much the same way as many other school districts that got higher scores than Newport-Mesa. “It wasn’t terribly in depth,” Antal said of the organization’s survey.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | August 21, 2007
A project to renovate 12 Victoria Street apartments and sell them individually will face a final hurdle tonight, when the Costa Mesa City Council decides whether to allow it. But it may also be a bit of a bellwether indicating how such condo conversion projects will fare in the future. Since April, the city has had a moratorium on subdividing apartment buildings for individual sale of units. In the meantime, the city has been drafting stricter rules for condo conversions that the council will consider next month.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | July 24, 2007
Despite a desire to increase home ownership in Costa Mesa, city leaders are considering new limits on the practice of subdividing apartment buildings so units can be sold individually. Changes to Costa Mesa city zoning standards could mean apartment complexes built more than 40 years ago and multi-tenant industrial parks on the Westside can't be subdivided and sold as separate units. Earlier this year, concerns arose that selling older apartments might be sticking first-time buyers with faulty plumbing or other infrastructure, and that allowing Westside industrial parks to be split and sold off would slow down redevelopment in a run-down part of the city.
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