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By By Elia Powers | November 11, 2005
Newport Theatre Arts Center producer David Colley knows that murder mysteries are historically crowd pleasers. They appeal to a wide audience and lend themselves to plot twists and second-guessing. Still, for Colley to select a play from that genre, it first has to pass a litmus test. "We struggle to find mysteries that work well," Colley said. "The writing frankly isn't that good for most of the shows." But when Colley and his colleagues on the center's board of directors come across what they consider a smart mystery script, they pounce on the production.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TOM TITUS | November 4, 2005
A new mystery, an old comedy and a series of plays each running under 10 minutes comprise the local theatrical menu for next weekend -- and just my luck, I'll be out of town. The newcomers are "Smoke and Mirrors," a new (at least to local audiences) whodunit at the Newport Theater Arts Center; "A Flea in Her Ear," Georges Feydeau's French farce at UC Irvine; and Orange Coast College's annual festival of short plays. The Newport offering, written by Will Osborne and Anthony Herrera, is billed as a "riveting mystery on an isolated island off the Gulf Coast."
NEWS
July 20, 2004
Sue Clark I couldn't wait. I was taking advantage of the chance to see three women of mystery and check out a few books besides. I felt like a double winner, and was grateful to the board of the Newport Beach Public Library for giving me this opportunity. My friends, Eva and Rachel, joined me in the Friends Meeting Room last Thursday and paused over the large piles of murder mysteries available for sale. I'd read all but one of Barbara Seranella's "Munch Mancini" series, and had brought her latest one for an autograph.
NEWS
By B.W. COOK | August 31, 2006
They came to finally determine just who murdered the sinister Mr. Divelopmor, who, in 1998, threatened to mass murder the monkeys at the Santa Ana Zoo, then take over the zoo from the city and turn the property into a mall. Divelopmor was murdered and his plot foiled. The case, however, was never solved. Last Saturday night in Orange County, 430 patrons of the Santa Ana Zoo, including an impressive contingent of Newport-Mesa residents, converged on the park at sundown to solve the case.
NEWS
November 19, 2004
Tom Titus The old-fashioned whodunit is among the most popular of theatrical genres. But when most people know the outcome of plays like "The Mousetrap" or "Ten Little Indians," some of the fun is taken out of viewing these revivals. With "A Murder is Announced," Vanguard University has unearthed a Christie mystery that hasn't been around the block several times. I was able to guess the guilty party by employing a method of deduction I've long practiced: The murderer generally is the most talented actor (or actress)
FEATURES
By Mary Ellen Bowman | July 1, 2007
Calling all adults! Summer reading programs are not just for kids. Join the Mysterious Summer Reading Program at the Crean Mariners, Balboa or Corona del Mar Branch libraries and experience the thrill of discovering new authors and receiving prizes for reading. You could win tickets to a Newport Beach Public Library Foundation's Distinguished Lecture Series Saturday event or a Newport Theater Arts Center play. The library is offering weekly and grand prizes to winners. Entering for the prizes is easy.
NEWS
August 20, 1999
It's no mystery that a good page-turner can smooth passage through the dog days of August. If you're hot on the trail for one, here are some award-winning suspects: "A Cold Day in Paradise" -- Recognized as a "Best First Novel" with both a Shamus and an Edgar Award, Steve Hamilton's thriller stars ex-minor league catcher, ex-cop and current private investigator Alex McKnight. When the maniac who killed his partner and sidelined Alex from the Detroit Police Department 14 years ago resurfaces, a gripping double mystery unfolds, replete with unpredictable twists.
NEWS
November 24, 2002
For readers with an appetite for intrigue sweetened with a soupcon of good taste, there's hardly a more satisfying genre than food mysteries. Laced with recipes for everything from Swedish meatballs to a buttermilk pound cake to die for, these lighthearted whodunits are tempting for both cooks and literary detectives. New from Diane Mott Davidson, dubbed "the Julia Child of Mystery Writers" by the New York Times, is "Chopping Spree." In another fast-paced caper, caterer-turned-sleuth Goldy Schulz returns to plan the event of the shopping season: The Princess Without a Price Tag Extravaganza for wealthy shopaholics.
FEATURES
By Mary Ellen Bowman | April 22, 2007
Libraries are considered quiet places of reading, reflection and study for the most part. Mystery writers love to break this stereotype with suspenseful plots using the library as a repository of havoc and mayhem. The Newport Beach Public Library has a separate mystery section for hardcover titles that will please fans of shifting alliances and hidden motives. Mystery titles in paperback and large type are also available for those who prefer these alternate reading formats. Some of these books are older titles, but all shatter the image of the shushing and silencing librarians who discover bodies and skulduggery in their neatly organized, well-maintained libraries.
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NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | February 15, 2014
What is memory? Since the first attempts to answer that question emerged in the late 19th century, scientists have made gradual but significant progress toward understanding exactly what memory is and how it works. Among today's leading memory experts, few, if any, have had a greater impact than UC Irvine's James McGaugh. A distinguished professor and fellow at UCI's Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, McGaugh's resume could fill this newspaper. As a scientist, he's devoted his life to advancing our knowledge of how memories are formed, retained and retrieved.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | August 16, 2013
Walkers young and old stroll along a recently enhanced trail in Fairview Park, marking the cleared pathway with their footprints, which get criss-crossed by the occasional bike tires rolling through. The nearly 400-foot-long path stretches east to west, abutting the fence line between the park and Parsons Field. It's within earshot of remote-controlled airplanes piloted by grounded aces that whir about the sky. Just over the fence, cheerleaders laugh as they practice, and young football players pant as they run their plays, all before the sun sets and the area closes.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
My friends and I spotted Oreo (as we have fondly named it because it looks like a cross between Pearl and Rupert, our former island swans) June 4 on our morning walk around Balboa Island - and subsequently on June 5, 6 and 7. It seems to favor the North Bayfront area and the strip of water along Bayside Drive (across from Promontory Point). Does anyone know where this swan came from and whether it is a new resident or just visiting? I've done a little research, and it's actually called a black neck swan, native to South America (Chile, in particular)
OCNOW
From the Los Angeles Times and Daily Pilot staff | December 17, 2012
Newport Beach police are still trying to determine why an Orange County man allegedly fired more than 50 rounds at the busy Fashion Island shopping center in Newport Beach. Police have talked to the suspect, who told detectives he was unhappy and that the gunfire was an attempt at "venting" his problems. Marcos Gurrola, 42, is accused of firing a semiautomatic handgun dozens of times into the air before he was taken into custody, authorities said. No one was wounded in the shooting, although one person was injured fleeing to safety.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melissa Hartson and By Melissa Hartson | November 21, 2012
The holiday season is upon us and with it comes visits with family and friends, and plenty of tasty food to eat at each gathering. Here are some who-done-it morsels full of flavor, fun and mystery. Hanna Denton has some big shoes to fill when she moves back home to take over her grandma's pie shop. The shop, the Upper Crust, has been known to make some of the best pies in the area. While Hanna's busy trying to perfect Grannie's recipes, Grannie is living the life in a swanky retirement community.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | June 1, 2012
I love online dictionaries. They're so convenient, especially for someone who, like me, must consult two different ones on a regular basis. Within minutes of checking Webster's New World College Dictionary at yourdictionary.com for a newspaper article I'm editing, I might have to check Merriam-Webster's at m-w.com for a magazine article I'm editing. That's because the newspaper I work for edits based on Associated Press style, which defers to Webster's New World, but the magazine follows the "Chicago Manual of Style," which defers to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate for all matters not expressly covered in the style guide.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | April 6, 2012
Can you say someone is taller or smarter or wealthier "than me"? Or must you write it "than I"? In the last few weeks I've gotten a lot of emails from readers about a sentence in my column that said a friend of mine is better educated "than me. " Their responses ranged from simple curiosity to absolute certainty I was wrong. "You erred," one reader told me. "You should have written, technically, 'than I.'" Was I wrong? To find the answer, you have to know several other things first, most notably the difference between conjunctions and prepositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Youmans | November 24, 2011
In Gourmet Detective's "Get Cartier," a faux murder mystery takes places at the Balboa Inn in Newport Beach. The performers are the prime suspects, but it's the audience that serves up the dish of true entertainment. "Get Cartier," which plays year-round, combines scripted comedy, musical performances, authentic costuming, and live piano underscoring, all within the setting of a full-service restaurant and interactive audience. Better yet, it's the audience member's job to solve the mystery.
NEWS
By Rabbi Marc Gellman | December 3, 2010
Q: First of all, I want to thank you for your prayerful answers to all and for sharing your gifts with your readers. On several occasions you've referred to our souls living on with God. I realize you can't encompass all religious beliefs in every answer, but could you please give some equal time to the beliefs of Catholics? Not only our souls but also our bodies will live on in heaven. Why have you never mentioned this in your column? A: What you're asking about is the belief in the resurrection of the body at the end of time.
NEWS
By William Lobdell | December 2, 2010
In recent weeks, two intriguing mysteries have emerged in Newport-Mesa that I'm dying to see solved: 1. Why were Costa Mesa Police Chief Christopher Shawkey and Capt. Ron Smith — the cop shop's leaders — put on administrative leave? 2. What were the circumstances behind the single-engine plane crash in Newport Beach's Back Bay that killed the pilot and two passengers? Let's first look at what happened in the Costa Mesa Police Department. Last month, City Manager Allan Roeder sent an e-mail to surprised employees.
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