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Mud

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NEWS
June 28, 2000
Andrew Glazer COSTA MESA -- Mud oozed onto Irvine's Main Street early Tuesday, causing several cars to spin out of control -- one of which careened into a parked fire engine. The street, which was buried under a four-inch layer of mud, was close by Irvine police from 6:30 to 10:30 a.m. Morning commuter traffic was snarled while Caltrans cleanup crews shoveled and swept the mud into storm drains. A Caltrans official said a clogged sprinkler at a Costa Mesa construction site on the Costa Mesa Freeway, which passes over Main Street, saturated the area with recycled water overnight, creating the muddy mess.
NEWS
October 11, 2008
Most political experts say there are two truisms when it comes to negative advertising: Voters always say they hate it, and it works. A recent study by researchers at Delaware, Texas Tech and Indiana universities concluded that negative advertising works because it leaves you with a lasting memory. It repulses us, but we sure don’t forget it. The negative advertising allegations and the subsequent whining about it ensued this week in Newport Beach. Councilman Keith Curry complained that Jack Croul, the moneyman behind the new City Hall referendum, is paying for fliers supporting Curry’s challenger, Dolores Otting.
NEWS
January 12, 2005
Chris Yemma Just what exactly does a few weeks worth of rain do to a soccer field? Ask the Corona del Mar High or University girls soccer teams. Amid the sloppiest and muddiest conditions either team has faced all season, and probably in a long while, Corona del Mar slipped and slid its way to a 2-0 Pacific Coast League victory Tuesday on University's home field ... or mud pit, rather. Before the opening whistle had blown, both teams were already sopped in mud just from warming up and stretching.
NEWS
May 7, 2005
Andrew Edwards A draft report detailing options to clean up contaminated mud at the bottom of Rhine Channel recommends the most expensive procedure be pursued to fix the channel, though that option could cost millions less than originally estimated. The price of dredging the polluted waterway and dumping the sediments in a landfill could cost slightly less than $17 million, according to a draft report completed by Anchor Environmental, a consulting firm with an office in Irvine.
NEWS
July 3, 2000
Alex Coolman It's not the temperature that necessarily bothers you so much as you attempt to enter the water at Balboa Island. At this time of year, the water is warm enough to be fairly pleasant, even at 6:30 in the morning. But the mud? The mud will get you. Feel it squish between your toes as you step down to the water's edge, goggles in hand. Feel it squelch and slide, raising goose bumps on your bare legs, making you wish you had stayed in bed. This is the kind of experience that's essential to the morning outings of the Balboa Swim Club, a recently founded group that endeavors to show how pleasantly clean the water in Newport Bay is by diving straight into it. The group, which has about seven or eight regular members, steps gingerly into the water off Collins Avenue on Tuesday mornings.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Luis Pena Most people get to see the splendor of Upper Newport Bay only from the trails or roads surrounding it. But on Saturdays, canoe rides offer a different vantage point. Potential paddlers meet at Shellmaker Island, where they receive canoe safety and paddling instructions, said Rita McCoy, volunteer coordinator for Upper Newport Bay. Visitors launch in two-person canoes, with a maximum of 10 canoes on the water at one time. "On the water, you get closer to the vegetation and closer to the birds, closer to the feeling of the bay," said Portia Arutunian, groundskeeper and educational tour guide.
NEWS
By John Depko and Susanne Perez | May 2, 2013
"Pain & Gain" is loosely based on a true story of bodybuilders gone wild on steroids and cocaine. Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie play the buffed anti-heroes who embark on a bizarre plot of kidnapping for ransom. Operating in the dark recesses of Miami society, they target unsavory wealthy victims with gruesome purpose and consequences. The resulting carnage is as bloody as any Quentin Tarantino film. It's full of crazy violence and bizarre plot twists. The relentlessly profane yet snappy dialogue strives for the dark humor of the Coen Brothers.
FEATURES
By CINDY TRANE CHRISTENSON | April 14, 2007
"God doesn't just forgive, he forgets. He erases the board. He destroys the evidence. He burns the microfilm. He clears the computer." — Max Lucado I reread the sign several times, and each time I read the words, I smiled. There on a plain, white board in big black letters was a sentence that brought color to my soul. It said, "Have a great, fun, fabulous, fantastic, wonderful day today!" I saw the sign before getting on a chairlift when I went skiing with family in February.
NEWS
January 4, 2000
I've been in some scary situations, but never have I been so frightened as one time when I was diving. When one spends one's childhood in a mud flat environment, one becomes familiar with stingrays or, as we kids called them, "stingarees." At low tide, no problem. Walk across the mud. However, come high tide with the mud covered with eight to 12 inches of water -- watch out! One does not lift one's foot. One slides the foot along in the mud. Sting rays are bottom feeders.
NEWS
January 5, 2002
It has been said that a definition of good character is doing the right thing when no one is looking. But once in a while, a sign of good character is doing the right thing when everyone is watching. The scene was a soccer tournament at Costa Mesa High School on Dec. 29. It had been raining on and off, mostly on, all day and the 8 a.m. games were played on fields that were barely playable. As the day wore on, the fields wore out. The afternoon series of games were scheduled to begin in a very steady rain that had turned the fields into mud pits.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Depko and Susanne Perez | May 2, 2013
"Pain & Gain" is loosely based on a true story of bodybuilders gone wild on steroids and cocaine. Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie play the buffed anti-heroes who embark on a bizarre plot of kidnapping for ransom. Operating in the dark recesses of Miami society, they target unsavory wealthy victims with gruesome purpose and consequences. The resulting carnage is as bloody as any Quentin Tarantino film. It's full of crazy violence and bizarre plot twists. The relentlessly profane yet snappy dialogue strives for the dark humor of the Coen Brothers.
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NEWS
October 11, 2008
Most political experts say there are two truisms when it comes to negative advertising: Voters always say they hate it, and it works. A recent study by researchers at Delaware, Texas Tech and Indiana universities concluded that negative advertising works because it leaves you with a lasting memory. It repulses us, but we sure don’t forget it. The negative advertising allegations and the subsequent whining about it ensued this week in Newport Beach. Councilman Keith Curry complained that Jack Croul, the moneyman behind the new City Hall referendum, is paying for fliers supporting Curry’s challenger, Dolores Otting.
BUSINESS
By Laurance Lapspecial to wheelbase communications | December 27, 2007
Dirt. It’s everywhere. Gumming up the keys of my laptop computer, clogging the zoom lens of my camera. It’s in all of my clothing. There’s even dirt in my dreams. And then in the memories of unzipping the tent every morning to see another perfect, yet absolutely different-from-last-night, landscape. Dirt in my nightmares, too. Of the ground rushing up to meet us as our Porsche Cayenne tumbled end over end. There was dirt all over the inside of the vehicle and dirt mixed with blood.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | June 11, 2007
When John Garrison wants to take out his sailboat, he first must ask one question: Is the tide high enough? Garrison's 50-foot sailboat drafts nine feet, which means he needs the water to be at least that deep to keep from hitting bottom. He's dredged under the dock at his Harbor Island home, but sometimes he can't take the boat much farther. "In front of my house, I have to wait until there's a three-foot high tide until I can go out of the channel," he said. "A lot of people that don't know the bay, like people from out of town, they run aground."
NEWS
By LESLIE DAIGLE | June 3, 2007
The Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve is a 752-acre wetland habitat where salt and fresh water meet and mix to form one of Southern California's few remaining estuaries. This refuge is home to nearly 200 species of birds, and during the migration season they bring their friends — as many as 30,000 migrating birds seek shelter before resuming their journey to whatever destination for which they are headed. The daily conditions, both ephemeral and challenging, create unique moments for the visitor, especially for those who attune both their eyes and ears to the many songs of the Back Bay. Varied habitats, including freshwater ponds, riparian woodlands and upland habitats combine with the seasons and tides to produce an ever-changing display of beauty.
FEATURES
By CINDY TRANE CHRISTENSON | April 14, 2007
"God doesn't just forgive, he forgets. He erases the board. He destroys the evidence. He burns the microfilm. He clears the computer." — Max Lucado I reread the sign several times, and each time I read the words, I smiled. There on a plain, white board in big black letters was a sentence that brought color to my soul. It said, "Have a great, fun, fabulous, fantastic, wonderful day today!" I saw the sign before getting on a chairlift when I went skiing with family in February.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | November 4, 2006
An unprecedented amount of last-minute spending on Costa Mesa council campaigns is flooding mailboxes with negative mailers and filling the final days before the election with low-blow attacks. And it all may be too late. Some voters say they simply throw the mailers away, and others have already cast absentee ballots. Costa Mesa Mayor Allan Mansoor, in a tight race for one of two open council seats, this week decried two recent mailers that attacked him and supported candidate Mike Scheafer.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | April 8, 2006
If you believe the mail in the 35th Senate District race, the two Republican candidates are hideous scoundrels who don't deserve to take out their would-be constituents' trash, let alone get their votes. Dana Point City Councilwoman Diane Harkey and Huntington Beach Assemblyman Tom Harman will square off with Democrat Larry Caballero in a Tuesday special election to win the 35th District Senate seat, which represents Costa Mesa, Newport Beach and all or part of 13 other cities in Orange County.
NEWS
By: Cindy Frazier | October 14, 2005
The grounds are beautiful, and merry golfers still gather to tee up at the foot of the canyon bluffs, but there is a sadness in the ocean breezes at Aliso Creek Inn and Golf Course, with the passing of longtime owner Violet "Vi" Brown. Brown died Sept. 18 at Hoag Memorial Hospital at the age of 85, succumbing to an unspecified illness she had struggled with for some time, according to her nephew, Ed Slymen. A memorial service is planned for 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, on the fairway at the course.
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