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BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | February 20, 2008
BALBOA ISLAND — Residents and shop owners have turned Picante Martin’s Mexican Restaurant into an impromptu memorial shrine, leaving flowers, candles and messages by the front door after the owner’s unexpected death last week. Martin Diaz-Puente, a Mexican immigrant who founded the restaurant in 1998, died Thursday at the age of 44 at his Costa Mesa home. Since then, the restaurant, which Diaz-Puente ran with his family, has been closed indefinitely, and friends and neighbors have expressed shock at the death of a man many considered an institution on the island.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Miller | February 19, 2008
The owner of Picante Martin’s Mexican Restaurant, a popular dining spot for years on Balboa Island, has died, the Orange County Coroner’s Office confirmed this morning. Martin Diaz-Puente, a Mexican immigrant who founded the restaurant in 1998, died Thursday at his Costa Mesa home. According to Supervising Deputy Coroner Dan Aikin, the 44-year-old Diaz-Puente went to lie down shortly after noon when he did not feel well, and a family member discovered him not breathing several minutes later.
FEATURES
By Kelly Strodl | October 1, 2007
The feathers on Adolfo Arteaga’s toucan-inspired headdress whirled and swirled as he bounded across the outdoor Plaza Stage at the second annual Community Arts Festival put on by the Orange County Performing Artscenter Sunday. Arteaga, along with his wife, Eva, and daughters Tonanzin, 17, and Huitzi, 14, shared their Aztec heritage with the crowds swarming the center’s grounds that day at a free event aimed at bringing the community into the arts. Tonanzin and Huitzi are home-schooled and love it because it gives them more time to travel with the family performance troupe “Danza Azteca Xochipilli.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | July 29, 2007
Martin Marin can still vividly remember the longest wrestling match he ever fought. It took place a dozen years ago in Yucatan, Mexico, on a blistering hot day when the Lucha Libre star was on a three-man team. Marin felt like quitting more than once because of the heat, but since the opposing team didn't give up, neither did he. More than one hour later, he still hadn't. "The guys kept going and going," Marin said. "I was thinking, 'Come on, now, let's go.' Nobody wanted to lose."
BUSINESS
By Amanda Pennington | February 19, 2007
NEWPORT-MESA — When she was a young girl, Martha Askew's mother and father instilled in her an unyielding work ethic while picking orchard fruit in the small town of Zacatecas in central Mexico. She remembers walking down the rows of plum trees in an area without electricity or running water. And when she, her mother and her siblings were getting ready to finish for the day, her mother would suggest they at least complete the row they were on before they went home. And then, when they finished that row, her mother would suggest they get a head start on the next day and do the next row so they could "beat everybody," she recalls with a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ana Facio Contreras | July 22, 2006
Attending a Lucha Libre match in Mexico is like therapy for wrestling fans. "People go to the matches and they scream and vent and escape their worries," said Jorge Guzman, the Mexican wrestler known as "El Hijo del Santo" [The Son of the Saint]. "When they leave the arena, they leave content and come back for another match. I think this is why the Lucha Libre is successful." Guzman thinks Lucha Libre, which translates loosely to "free-style fighting," will become more popular in the United States.
FEATURES
By ERIC BEVER | April 27, 2006
Illegal Immigration: the debate that continues to rage and now seems to center on how many "rights," including outright citizenship, must be conferred upon the millions of illegal immigrants now occupying the U.S. One point is conspicuous by its absence. What is Mexico bringing to the table? Although it has been generally agreed that Mexico and its people are the main beneficiaries of any change in U.S. policy, nobody has asked Mexico to make this a fair exchange. In return for the generous "rights" that Mexico demands for its people who have illegally entered the U.S., Mexico has offered us no concessions.
NEWS
By: Greer Wylder | August 19, 2005
Nearly 4,000 displaced customers endured 21 days in July without one of their favorite Newport Boulevard eateries, El Matador. That's how many people grabbed fliers, peeked in windows and inquired about when the beloved Mexican restaurant would reopen, owner Greg McConaughy said. After nearly 40 years, El Matador was shut down earlier this summer following a nasty family dispute that left the restaurant in the hands of county officials. Now, thanks to McConaughy and El Matador's loyal staff, El Matador is back.
NEWS
October 24, 2003
Greer Wylder On Costa Mesa's Westside, Mexican food is the winning prize. Prices are low, and quality is high. Each Mexican restaurant offers specialty fresh tamales, seafood, carnitas and even health-conscious meals. Three of the most popular fast food-style restaurants are El Toro Bravo Tortilleria, Taco Mesa (both on West 19th Street) and Wahoo's Fish Tacos around the corner on Placentia Avenue. If you haven't visited these three, you're missing out on some of the best food in the area.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
Ages and hometowns vary ... They may be from Ecuador or Panama or El Salvador or Guatemala or Honduras or Argentina, etc., but that makes no difference to Newport Beach Councilman Dick Nichols, who apparently only knows one nationality for those of Latino descent ... Nichols now famously made a statement about "Mexicans" taking over the grassy area of Corona del Mar State Beach, which prompted lots of media attention and...
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